Category Archives: Human behavior

Chart of the day: Targets of U.S. hate crimes


The latest available breakdown from the Federal Bureau of Investigation:

BLOG Hate crimes
Given the tenor of the current presidential election, we expect the numbers for 2016 may be higher.

And bear in mind that these figures are only for crimes actually reported to police, and given the mistrust of police in minority communities, the actual proportions could be significantly different.

Headline of the day II: Great cultural watershed?


From The Local.se:

Sex pigs halt traffic after laser attack on Pokémon teens

Map of the day: The veritas of the vino


It should come as no surprise that the French are both the most prolific wine producers on the planet as well as its most prolific consumers, consuming 45 liters a year compared to a mere 10 liters in the U.S.

From Views of the World, the blog of Oxford University’s Benjamin Hennig, Senior Research Fellow in the School of Geography and the Environment, a cartogram of the world with boundaries redrawn to reflect the total wine consumption of each country:

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Ethnic divides mark parental health anxieties


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A survey of American parents reveals marked differences the the health anxieties parents harbor for their children, but two digital age worries, sexting and Internet safety, make the top ten lists for black, Hispanic, and Anglo parents alike.

Interestingly, school violence doesn’t make the list for white parents, though it does from Hispanics and African Americans, while worries racial inequalities, high on the list of black parental concerns, the anxiety doesn’t make the lists of the other two groups.

From the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health:

In the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health 2016 survey of child health concerns, a national sample of adults reported numerous mental health issues as “big problems” for US children and teens aged 0-17 years. Overall, 7 of the Top 10 concerns reflect children’s mental health: either specific mental health problems (depression, stress and suicide) or issues that often have an underlying mental health component (bullying, obesity, drug abuse, school violence).

When the 2016 Top 10 results are presented separately by the racial/ethnic groups of the adults responding, bullying is the #1 concern among black and Hispanic adults, and #2 among white adults. However, the poll shows some key differences across racial/ethnic groups:

  • For black adults, racial inequities and school violence are the #2 and #3 health concerns – neither of which appears in the Top 10 list for white adults.
  • Black adults are the only group with gun injuries and hunger ranked in the Top 10.
  • Childhood obesity and drug abuse are in the top three “big problems” for white and Hispanic adults, but lower on the list for black adults.
  • Teen pregnancy appears in the Top 10 among Hispanic adults, but not among black or white adults.
  • While depression ranks #9 or #10 across all racial/ethnic groups, only white adults have suicide in the Top 10.

Differences in Concerns about Racial Inequities, Suicide

Consistently, black and Hispanic adults are more likely than white adults to label health topics as a “big problem.” However, the magnitude of the disparity differs across topics. For example, a large gap exists between black adults (61%) and white adults (17%) citing racial inequities as a “big problem” for US children. A smaller difference is seen for suicide (53% of Hispanic adults vs 36% of white adults).

Implications

This 10th annual Top 10 survey reveals key differences across racial/ethnic groups in the issues viewed as “big problems” for children – reflecting how contemporary topics vary in importance to different communities.

Comparing the Top 10 lists across racial/ethnic groups helps to illustrate this point. For black adults, the emergence of racial inequities, school violence and gun injuries in the Top 10 mirrors national attention regarding the safety of black youth. The presence of teen pregnancy as a Top 10 child health concern among Hispanic adults may reflect cultural attitudes unique to that group. For white adults, the presence of suicide at #8 reflects the importance of this mental health issue, relative to other concerns.

Black and Hispanic adults were more likely than white adults to rate all topics as a “big problem” for US children and teens. But the magnitude of the difference varied, from large differences in black vs white views of racial inequities as child health concerns, to fairly similar ratings of suicide.

This year, several Top 10 concerns directly relate to the mental health of children. Concerns about bullying, stress, suicide and depression reflect increased attention to the complexities that affect many aspects of childhood including school performance, peer and family relationships, and successful transition to adulthood. Mental health issues can also increase children’s risk for obesity, drug abuse, and other health problems. The broad recognition of mental health as a key child health concern supports the importance of ensuring access to mental health services for all US children.

Data Source

This report presents findings from a nationally representative household survey conducted exclusively by GfK Custom Research, LLC (GfK), for C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital via a method used in many published studies.  The survey was administered in May 2016 to a randomly selected, stratified group of adults age 18 and older (n=2,100). Adults were selected from GfK’s web-enabled KnowledgePanel® that closely resembles the U.S. population. The sample was subsequently weighted to reflect population figures from the Census Bureau. The survey completion rate was 63% among panel members contacted to participate. The margin of error is ± 3-12 percentage points.

Headline of the day II: Trumpians Down Under?


From BBC News:

Anti-Islam group storms Anglican church in Australia

Right-wing protestors dressed in mock Muslim outfits and chanting anti-Islamic slogans have stormed a church service on Australia’s east coast.

Map of the day: European noise pollution


From the European Environment Agency, a look at regions in Europe and their relative exposure to noise pollution and possibility suitable for designation as quiet zones:

BLOG Euroquiet

Chart of the day: Bernie, the sanest candidate


We take remote psychiatric diagnoses with a large grain of salt, but have to agree with the conclusion of the latest such effort, which compares today’s U.S. presidential candidates with political figures from the past.

But when the diagnoses comes from a researcher at one of the world’s leading universities, they deserve some attention.

The effort was conducted by Kevin Dutton, a postdoctoral research psychologist at Oxford University. Dutton is also conducting research for Britain’s Defence Ministry and the U.S. Air Force “to investigate the effects of both covert and overt surveillance on behaviour, especially within the context of promoting prosocial action.”

But his basic research area is on how psychopathic traits can draw people into specific professionals, politics among them.

So in a report for Scientific American MIND, he examined the American presidential candidates, including the two top runners-up, and compared them to political leaders of the past, with academic biographers and scholars examining leaders of the past and a political journalist evaluating the candidates using the standardized Psychopathic Personality Inventory assessment:

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The explanation of the numbers and what they mean from the Scientific American MIND blog:

The table reveals each subject’s scores for psychopathy’s eight component traits. The first three traits—social influence (SI), fearlessness (F) and stress immunity (STI), known collectively as the Fearless Dominance traits—tend to be strong in successful leaders. The next four qualities, collectively called Self-Centered Impulsivity, can be more problematic: Machiavellian Egocentricity (ME), Rebellious Nonconformity (RN), Blame Externalization (BE) and Carefree Nonplanfulness (CN). The eighth trait is Coldheartedness (C), which can be helpful in making tough decisions such as sending a nation’s youth to war but is dangerous in excess.

While there is no set score that officially renders someone a psychopath, it’s revealing to see who scores in the top 20 percent of all people who have been evaluated with the PPI-R. The table highlights those with scores in this upper quintile, which are somewhat lower for women than for men.

The verdict on the candidates: Trump, Clinton and Cruz all scored in the upper quintile in Self-Centered Impulsivity and Coldheartedness. Trump landed in the top 20 percent across the board on psychopathy traits, with a total score that placed him between Idi Amin and Adolf Hitler.

Admittedly, remote assessment can be highly subjective, but we’d have to agree with the journalist who ranked the candidates: Bernie really was the only relatively sane one in the bunch.

H/T to Undernews.