Category Archives: Photography

And the deed is done, the last offspring hitched


We know that few things are more boring than looking at pictures of the wedding of folks you’ve never met.

Nonetheless, we can’t resist sharing the joy of the nuptials of the last of our four offspring, Samantha Marie Brenneman, to a high school friend, Kyle Brandon Troupe, the event officiated by a third high school pal, the same fellow who had brought them together on the suspicion that there was, indeed, something there.

The venue for the day was the Bellvue Club on the shores of Lake Merritt, and the day was glorious, as seen from the window of the gallery where festivities commenced:

30 April 2016, Panasonic DMC-ZS19, ISO 100, 1/800 sec, f/4, 4.3 mm

30 April 2016, Panasonic DMC-ZS19, ISO 100, 1/800 sec, f/4, 4.3 mm

Before the main event, Samantha paused for a quick snap by her doting father:

30 April 2016, Panasonic DMC-ZS19, ISO 500, 1/250 sec, f/4.7, 10.3 mm

30 April 2016, Panasonic DMC-ZS19, ISO 500, 1/250 sec, f/4.7, 10.3 mm

And bridal niece Sadie Rose, the flower girl, managed to sit still as her floral crown was affixed:

30 April 2016, Panasonic DMC-ZS19, ISO 800, 1/60 sec, f/3.3, 21.8 mm

30 April 2016, Panasonic DMC-ZS19, ISO 800, 1/60 sec, f/3.3, 21.8 mm

On to the main even and the exchange of vows, followed by the exchange of rings:

30 April 2016, Panasonic DMC-ZS19, ISO 400, 1/60 sec, f/5.4, 4.3 mm

30 April 2016, Panasonic DMC-ZS19, ISO 400, 1/60 sec, f/5.4, 4.3 mm

And the kiss of the newlyweds:

30 April 2016, Panasonic DMC-ZS19, ISO 500, 1/60 sec, f/3.6, 5.4 mm

30 April 2016, Panasonic DMC-ZS19, ISO 500, 1/60 sec, f/3.6, 5.4 mm

Followed by the reception and dance:

30 April 2016, Panasonic DMC-ZS19, ISO 800, 1/60 sec, f/4.8, 11 mm

30 April 2016, Panasonic DMC-ZS19, ISO 800, 1/60 sec, f/4.8, 11 mm

Off for the day; youngest daughter gets hitched


Here’s a couple of snaps from last night’s rehearsal dinner.

The bride-to-be, Samantha Marie Brenneman, hoists a glass:

29 April 2016, Panasonic DMC-ZS19, ISO 800, 1/60 sec, f/3.3, 4.3 mm

29 April 2016, Panasonic DMC-ZS19, ISO 800, 1/60 sec, f/3.3, 4.3 mm

And her elder sister’s prodigous progeny, Sadie Rose, won’t relinquish esnl‘s chapeau:

29 April 2016, Panasonic DMC-ZS19, ISO 400, 1/60 sec, f/3.3, 4.3 mm

29 April 2016, Panasonic DMC-ZS19, ISO 400, 1/60 sec, f/3.3, 4.3 mm

And the earth below: Horizon over the Baltic Sea


From NASA, another spectacular shot from the International Space Station:

ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti captured this image while on the International Space Station. It shows cloud cover over England, Baltic Sea and the Persian Gulf. It also displays a golden aurora with a splash of red through the stars during the night of Dec. 15, 2014.

ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti captured this image while on the International Space Station. It shows cloud cover over England, Baltic Sea and the Persian Gulf. It also displays a golden aurora with a splash of red through the stars during the night of Dec. 15, 2014.

Heavens above!: Another spectacular solar flare


From NASA Goddard, another spectacular 4k video of a solar flare.

Crank the video toggle [at the gear knob] up to your monitor’s highest resolution and enjoy:

Program notes:

NASA’s 4K View of April 17 Solar Flare

On April 17, 2016, an active region on the sun’s right side released a mid-level solar flare, captured here by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory. This solar flare caused moderate radio blackouts, according to NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center. Scientists study active regions — which are areas of intense magnetism — to better understand why they sometimes erupt with such flares. This video was captured in several wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light, a type of light that is typically invisible to our eyes, but is color-coded in SDO images for easy viewing.

Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/SDO/Genna Duberstein

The earth below: A satellite Grand Canyon view


From NASA’s Earth Observatory, a segment of a spectacular 19 megabyte montage of astronaut images of the Grand Canyon:

BLOG Canyon edit

The Grandest of Canyons

Grand Canyon National Park stretches 277 river miles (446 kilometers) across the Colorado Plateau of northwestern Arizona, and it averages 10 miles (16 kilometers) wide. But it is not just that spectacular size that makes it a natural wonder. It is the spectacular variety of ecosystems, micro-climates, and life forms that make it the grandest of canyons.

That variety arises out of the depth (or height) of the canyon. From the highest point on the Kaibab Plateau of the North Rim to the water line of the Colorado River, the elevation changes by 8,000 feet (2400 meters). According to the National Park Service (NPS), at least 129 different vegetation communities are found in the park at various altitudes. The dominant ones are the riparian (river) community; desert scrub; pine and juniper woodland; Ponderosa pine forest; and montane meadows and subalpine grasslands. Or as NPS puts it, you can wander from the environmental equivalent of Mexico to that of Canada all within a few miles.

More than 1,700 species of vascular plants—and another 400 of mosses, lichens, and fungi—populate these communities. At least a dozen plant species are only found only within the park. Those plants and trees give cover or food to 362 bird species, 92 species of mammals, and 59 types of reptiles and amphibians. This abundant life spreads across a landscape that is geologically abundant too, offering a rock and fossil record that spans three eras of geologic time. Six million years of erosion by the Colorado River has exposed two billion years of Earth history.

The photographs above and below were shot from the International Space Station (ISS) on December 18, 2009, by American astronaut Jeff Williams. “It was a quiet period aboard the Station, with only two of us—Russian cosmonaut Max Suraev and me,” Williams recalls. “Using a Nikon D2Xs with an 800mm lens—and looking through one of the windows in the Russian docking compartment—I found the Canyon through mostly clear skies. I quickly fired off multiple overlapping frames with the idea to later merge the oblique shots.” The mosaic above was composed from 12 of those photographs. (Click on the link below it to download a full-resolution version.) The other photos are closeups derived from the wider shot.

Williams and the ISS were 650 miles (1050 kilometers) to the southwest at the time, over the Pacific Ocean near Baja. He located the canyon while observing the jumble of wooded plateaus, mountains, and tan desert flats of the western United States. The near-midday sun of winter threw long shadows; combined with the highly oblique viewing angle, the light gives a strong three-dimensional sense that is marred by just a few streaks of cloud.

Grand Canyon is the second most visited national park in the United States, drawing 5.5 million visitors in 2015. The park will celebrate its 100th anniversary in 2019. The National Park Service itself is celebrating its centennial in 2016.

Astronaut photographs ISS022-E-14078 through ISS022-E-14087 were acquired on December 18, 2009, with a Nikon D2Xs digital camera using an 800 millimeter lens, and are provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations Facility and the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit, Johnson Space Center. The image was taken by a member of the Expedition 22 crew.

Heavens above!: There’s a bubble in my Hubble


From NASA:

BLOG Hubble

Hubble Sees a Star ‘Inflating’ a Giant Bubble

For the 26th birthday of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers are highlighting a Hubble image of an enormous bubble being blown into space by a super-hot, massive star. The Hubble image of the Bubble Nebula, or NGC 7635, was chosen to mark the 26th anniversary of the launch of Hubble into Earth orbit by the STS-31 space shuttle crew on April 24, 1990

“As Hubble makes its 26th revolution around our home star, the sun, we celebrate the event with a spectacular image of a dynamic and exciting interaction of a young star with its environment. The view of the Bubble Nebula, crafted from WFC-3 images, reminds us that Hubble gives us a front row seat to the awe inspiring universe we live in,” said John Grunsfeld, Hubble astronaut and associate administrator of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters, in Washington, D.C.

The Bubble Nebula is seven light-years across—about one-and-a-half times the distance from our sun to its nearest stellar neighbor, Alpha Centauri, and resides 7,100 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cassiopeia.

The seething star forming this nebula is 45 times more massive than our sun. Gas on the star gets so hot that it escapes away into space as a “stellar wind” moving at over four million miles per hour. This outflow sweeps up the cold, interstellar gas in front of it, forming the outer edge of the bubble much like a snowplow piles up snow in front of it as it moves forward.

There’s lots more, after the jump. . . Continue reading

And now for something completely different. . .


And absolutely dazzling, too.

It’s a full 2160p video [click the gear wheel and set it to your monitor’s maximum resolution] from NASA starring the most extravagant light show on earth.

About the only bad about this stunning compilation, at least from our perspective, is the annoying musical track. Feel free to turn it off and pick your own musical accompaniment [think “Ode to Joy,” Vivaldi, or even some Enya if that’s more to your taste].

From NASA:

Stunning Aurora Borealis from Space in Ultra-High Definition

Program notes:

NASA Television’s newest offering, NASA TV UHD, brings ultra-high definition video to a new level with the kind of imagery only the world’s leader in space exploration could provide.

Harmonic produced this show exclusively for NASA TV UHD, using time-lapses shot from the International Space Station, showing both the Aurora Borealis and Aurora Australis phenomena that occur when electrically charged electrons and protons in the Earth’s magnetic field collide with neutral atoms in the upper atmosphere.

For more info: http://go.nasa.gov/1lyUGlY