Ad Campaign of the Year: Do It for Denmark!


Always nice when you can mix business with pleasure, and nobody’s done it better than Spies Rejser, a Danish travel agency that’s found a way to make a buck — er, kroner — on of the national demographic collapse that’s giving the country a strongly grey-haired tinge.

With the country aging, more babies are needed, and tavel is, after all, one of the great aphrodisiacs. right? So grab up a fertile partner of the opposite sex, snap up a ticket and Do It for Denmark!

Do It For Denmark!

The program note:

No one has found out how to help Denmark’s falling birth rate. Until now. Spies Travels announces a competition where you have to make a baby to win.

David Horsey: Space In-Vaders


The editorial cartoonist of the Los Angeles Times takes on the Koch borther campaign to shut down the solar power industry:

BLOG Koch

Another alarm, this time of death from above


First, the news stpry from BBC News:

Asteroid impact risks ‘underappreciated’

A visualisation showing where sizeable asteroids have hit the Earth in recent years has been released by the B612 Foundation.

The US-based group, which includes a number of former Nasa astronauts, campaigns on the issue of space protection.

It hopes the visualisation will press home the idea that impacts are more common than we think.

The presentation leans on data collected by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO).

More from the B612 Foundation:

Between 2000 and 2013, a network of sensors that monitors Earth around the clock listening for the infrasound signature of nuclear detonations detected 26 explosions on Earth ranging in energy from 1 to 600 kilotons – all caused not by nuclear explosions, but rather by asteroid impacts. These findings were recently released from the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization, which operates the network.

To put this data in perspective, the atomic bomb that destroyed Hiroshima in 1945 exploded with an energy impact of 15 kilotons. While most of these asteroids exploded too high in the atmosphere to do serious damage on the ground, the evidence is important in estimating the frequency of a potential “city-killer-size” asteroid.

A list of the impacts shown in the video can be found here. For more information on this data, please check out our Impact Video FAQ. You can read or download the press release about [Tuesday]’s event here.

And finally, the video, via Vimeo:

B612 Impact Video 4-20-14 H264

Headlines again, with global warning signs


Today’s entries cover everything from social media to troubling tensions in Asia.

We open with a tale of corporatized medicine from the Los Angeles Times:

UC OKs paying surgeon $10 million in whistleblower-retaliation case

The settlement ends a case brought by the ex-head of UCLA’s orthopedic surgery department, who says the medical school allowed doctors to take industry payments that may have compromised patient care.

The settlement reached Tuesday in Los Angeles County Superior Court came just before closing arguments were due to begin in a whistleblower-retaliation case brought by Dr. Robert Pedowitz, 54, a surgeon who was recruited to UCLA in 2009 to run the orthopedic surgery department.

In 2012, the surgeon sued UCLA, the UC regents, fellow surgeons and senior university officials, alleging they failed to act on his complaints about widespread conflicts of interest and later retaliated against him for speaking up.

From Reuters, a tale of not-so-rigorous regulation:

Special Report: For private deals, no one is watching the watchdogs

The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, the industry’s self-regulating body, requires that broker-dealers conduct “a reasonable investigation” of a private placement before selling it for the issuer. That’s the due diligence. At a minimum, FINRA requires that for each new placement, the broker’s investigation entail a review of the issuer and its management; its business prospects; assets it holds or plans to acquire; the intended use of proceeds from the offering; and claims made in any offering documents.

Some brokers lack the resources to cover all of that, so they rely on reports supplied by third-party due diligence firms. The reports are paid for by the issuer of the private placement. Brokers are meant to use the reports to help them decide whether to market the placements. They don’t typically show the reports to clients.

The set-up constitutes what many see as a fundamental conflict of interest: Companies that raise money through private placements, such as Provident, are paying due diligence firms to review their deals so that broker-dealers will sell them. “They have to write these reports in such a manner that it’s gotta be acceptable” to the issuer, said Michael Miller, a due diligence officer at Sigma Financial, a broker-dealer in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

This isn’t the only instance of regulatees selecting their regulatory overseers. Developers seeking approval for their projects also select the folks who prepare their Environmental Impact Reports [EIRs]. During our coverage of tribal casinos in California we discovered that most of the projects we covered had EIRs prepared by one single company. Their reports always seemed to find that the casinos would have negligible impact. The same was true in communities like Berkeley, where successful developers generally used the same handful of consultants. . .

From BBC News, soaring profits from the intangible:

Facebook earnings surge on mobile advertising

Social networking giant Facebook reported profits of $642m (£383m) during the first quarter of 2014, beating analyst expectations.

The firm said surging mobile advertising helped push first quarter revenue 72% higher, to $2.5bn.

Mobile now makes up 59% of advertising revenue, from 30% a year ago.

BBC News again, this time with profits for a media makers whose products carry those Facebook ads:

Apple announces share buyback as earnings rise

Technology giant Apple reported profits of $10.2bn (£6.1bn) after selling 43.7 million iPhones during the three-month period ending 29 March.

Apple also announced plans to buy an additional $30bn of its stock back from shareholders and to increase its quarterly dividend by 8%.

It also said it would split its stock for the first time in nine years.

The moves are meant to appease investors as the firm reports slowing revenue growth.

From Jiji Press, hands across the Pacific struggle to engage in the neoliberal handshake:

Japan, U.S. to defer broad trade accord

Japan and the United States are now seen deferring a broad trade agreement until after a summit meeting set for Thursday due to differences over key issues, informed sources said Tuesday.

The two countries’ leaders are now expected to welcome progress so far made in bilateral trade talks under the multilateral Trans-Pacific Partnership framework and reaffirm their nations’ commitment to concluding the TPP negotiations, the sources said.

A stalemate over Japanese tariffs on U.S. pork continued during a working-level session in Tokyo on Tuesday.

On to Europe with this report of realism from From New Europe:

Majority of Germans think eurozone crisis not over

A new opinion poll shows that a majority of Germans believed the eurozone crisis is far from over, Germany’s Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung reported Wednesday.

According to a survey conducted by polling institute INSA, 81 percent of those asked said the European debt crisis was not yet over, while only 7 percent believed the crisis had ended.

The poll said many German citizens were concerned about developments in Greece. Only 34 percent of respondents saw the country on the right track. A further 39 percent said Greece was not making enough efforts to implement reforms.

The Portugal News covers lingering neoliberalism at work:

Austerity ‘certain’ to continue after troika – Socialist Party

  • The Portuguese Socialist Party said on Tuesday it was “certain” after a meeting with the troika (International Monetary Fund, European Central Bank and the European Commission) that austerity would continue in Portugal despite the financial assistance programme formally coming to an end shortly

And from Reuters, a billionaire and former chief executive gets a mere wrist-slap for profitable corruption:

Italy’s Berlusconi to start community service work next week

Former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi said on Wednesday he would start doing community service with the elderly next week as part of a one-year tax fraud sentence.

A court ruled earlier this month that Berlusconi, one of Italy’s richest men, must spend four hours a week [emphasis added] in a Catholic old people’s home on the outskirts of Milan.

After completing the first six months, Berlusconi’s one-year sentence will automatically be reduced to 10 and a half months.

And from United Press International, Italian blackshirt nostalgia:

Mussolini’s birthplace in Italy to get a fascist museum

A museum dedicated to the history of fascism will be created in Predappio, Italy, the birthplace of dictator Benito Mussolini, Mayor Giorgio Frassineti announced.

A museum dedicated to the history of fascism will be created in Predappio, Italy, the birthplace of dictator Benito Mussolini, Mayor Giorgio Frassineti announced.

The northern Italian city, known for neo-fascist pilgrimages, already maintains the home in which Mussolini was born, as well as the mausoleum where he is buried. The museum will be located in the now-abandoned Casa del Fascio, built in the 1930s as part of an urban renewal program, to accommodate visitors and to glorify Mussolini.

On to Greece, in the first of three stories on the austerian numbers game, first from ANA-MPA:

Greek primary surplus totalled 3.4 billion euros in 2013?

  • Greece’s primary surplus totalled 3.4 billion euros in 2013 (excluding the financial support offered to banks), Alternate Finance Minister Christos Staikouras said on Wednesday.The primary surplus figure was based using Eurostat’s methodology, while the troika estimates this figure at 1.5 billion euros.

A contrary take from The Guardian:

Greece’s public finances are in a dire state, and cooking the books won’t help

  • Primary budget facts and details in the small print can no longer be hidden by creative accounting and a sleight of hand

It was dodgy accounting that got Greece into a mess in the first place. Now, more dodgy accounting is being used to dress up the dire state of the nation’s public finances.

When the government in Athens announced last week that it was running a surplus in its primary budget – a measure of financial health that strips out interest payments – it could only do so by recording more than €3bn (£2.5bn) in arrears owed to hospitals and the social security fund as assets. Without this creative accounting, there would have been a primary deficit.

And the third story, with Neos Kosmos covering one of the consequences:

Greece lines up tax cuts

  • Greece is set to ask its eurozone partners to gradually reduce corporation tax rates as part of a wider plan to generate growth in Greece

Greece is set to ask its eurozone partners when the Eurogroup meets on May 5 for permission to gradually reduce corporation tax rates as part of a wider plan to generate growth in Greece, Kathimerini understands.

Several government officials, including Finance Minister Yannis Stournaras and Development Minister Costis Hatzidakis met Tuesday to finalize a three-page proposal that will form the basis for a growth plan that will run from this year until 2020. Both coalition parties, New Democracy and PASOK, were represented at the meeting.

From EnetEnglish.gr, austerity’s fruit ripening:

Uninsured mother unable to afford medication loses her life

  • How many more patients must die from austerity, asks voluntary health clinic
  • Woman’s death proves once again that the government’s ‘policy of excluding our uninsured fellow citizens from healthcare means that human life is endangered and often lost’, says the Metropolitan Community Clinic in Elliniko, Athens

40-year-old uninsured single mother of two young children from the island of Mytilini died earlier this month from the effects of a stroke because she didn’t have the money to pay for her medication, the country’s leading voluntary health clinic said on Wednesday.

Raising the woman’s case, the Metropolitan Community Clinic at Elliniko, Athens, said the woman’s death proved once again that the government’s “policy of excluding our uninsured fellow citizens from healthcare means that human life is endangered and often lost”.

And from To Vima, more of that hard times intolerance:

ANTARSYA condemns fascist attack against election campaign offices

  • Attack took place on Easter Monday, on the anniversary of the military junta’s rise to power in 1967

Leftist party ANTARSYA has condemned a fascist attack against its election campaign offices in Athens, which took place on Monday the 21st of April, anniversary of the 1967 military dictatorship’s rise to power.

ANTARSYA’s municipal candidate Petros Konstantinou claimed to have personally received threatening telephone calls on Thursday evening, with the caller threatening “to show you what Golden Dawn can do”.

The attackers smashed the front door of the offices and ripped down anti-fascism posters that were in the building’s lobby. A trail of blood was discovered outside the offices on the 5th of floor, which the attackers unsuccessfully tried to break into.

On to the Ukraine and journalistic errata from Consortiumnews:

NYT Retracts Russian-Photo Scoop

  • Exclusive: After starting a propaganda stampede – with a lead story about photos of Russian troops purportedly in Ukraine – the New York Times admits the pictures really don’t prove much, and one photo was labeled as snapped in Russia when it was really taken in Ukraine, writes Robert Parry.

After the jump, more escalation and anxieties in Asia’s game of Thrones [with Uncle Sam jumping in], an almost-admirable death sentence, Asian environmental woes, the lLatest chapter of Fukushimapocalypse Now!, plus new developments in the world of Big Brothering and covert ops, plus the latest from the realm of cannabis and crime. . . Continue reading

Three cheers for journalist Scott Bujnak!


Class war comes to othe newsroom, via Romenesko:

On April 7, I reported that Lee Enterprises CEO Mary Junck received a $700,000 bonus for simply refinancing the newspaper chain’s debt.

The news disgusted longtime St. Louis Post-Dispatch carpenter Scott Bujnak.

“That was the straw that broke the camel’s back,” he says.

Bujnak, 56, went into publisher Ray Farris‘s office last Wednesday and quit after 18 years at the Lee-owned daily.

Columnist Bill McClellan writes:

He told his boss he was through and explained why. What’s the point of saving nickels and dimes when the big boss gets a $700,000 bonus? Word spread quickly. “He did what?” “Wow.”

How many people at how many companies have daydreamed about doing the same thing?

Bujnak apparently doesn’t regret quitting, even without another job lined up. “I have a smile on my face you can’t wipe off,” he tells McClellan.

The columnist points out:

Workers have suffered while the big bosses have prospered. Pensions were long ago frozen. Mandatory unpaid furloughs were introduced. Layoffs were the worst. Families were ravaged. Yet, it was the small things that got to Bujnak. Mixing paints, cannibalizing chairs. He started resenting saving the company money.

Especially when people like CEO Junck were regularly getting big bonuses. (She also got a bonus of $500,000 in March of 2012 – again for simply refinancing Lee’s debt.)

Read the rest.

Quote of the day: No more nuke power plants


From Terry Tamminen, former head of the California Environmental Protection Agnecy via NBC News:

Tell your electric utility: No new nuclear power plants

And no relicensing of existing ones either. Chernobyl and Fukushima have demonstrated that although nuclear accidents are rare, when they do occur, the cost and devastation is biblical (according to the U.N., $235 billion for the former and as much as twice that for the latter). Moreover, we’ll live with the toxic waste, even from the power plants that function normally, for generations with no viable way to neutralize or safely store it, meaning we’re risking the lives of our kids and grandkids for “cheap” power today.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who holds a doctorate in physical chemistry and therefore knows a thing or two about these matters, has persuaded her country to end its use of nuclear power completely. Instead, the German government has adopted an 80 percent renewable-energy target for 2050 (renewables already account for 25 percent of the national electricity mix), proving you can have a robust industrial and manufacturing economy based on clean energy sources.

Chart of the day II: Another kind of inflation


From Fast Food Failure: How CEO-to-Worker Pay Disparity Undermines the Industry and the Overall Economy [PDF], a new report for Demos by Catherine Ruetschlin revealing the massive inflation in wages for those at the very top of an industry employing some of America’s most poorly paid works.

In this chart Ruetschlin compares wage inflation in fast food with other industries [UPDATE: edited image for contrast to improve legibility]:

BLOG Pay disparity

Revoltin’, ain’t it?