Category Archives: Video

MexicoWatch: Fueling conflict, protests, and pols


We begin with a very interesting story from Al Jazeera America:

Terror in Coahuila: Gas reserves beneath turf war in northern Mexico?

  • Texas researchers link spike in murders and disappearances to land grab in energy-rich Burgos Basin

Mexico’s northern border area is full of semidesert lands with small cities, towns and ranches dedicated to livestock and forage crops. Under this inhospitable surface lies the world’s fourth-largest reserves of shale gas and 95 percent of Mexico’s coal.

The cycle of great violence began here — as in the nearby states of Nuevo Leon, Tamaulipas and Veracruz — in 2009. From 2005 to 2009, there were 788 homicides in the state. In 2010 and 2011, Coahuila reported 1,067 homicides, according to the Executive Secretariat of the National Public Security System.

The prevailing explanation for the violence is that the ruthless Zetas cartel established control of the area while overwhelmed authorities did little to oppose them. But growing analysis links the violence to a corrupt group of government officials in whose jurisdiction lie millions of pesos in hydrocarbons.

“Energy Reform and Security in Northeastern Mexico,” a report published by the Mexico Center at Rice University, places the regional violence in the context of powerful economic interests. It is not the government’s version, that of a war among cartels for routes to the U.S., nor is it the concept of la plaza, or territorial control by criminal organizations. Rather, the struggle is for control of the more than 70,000 square miles of the Burgos Basin and its enormous gas reserves.

From the Latin American Herald Tribune, questions and reassurances:

Mexican AG: Outside Experts Have Resources Needed in Missing Students Case

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, or IACHR, experts investigating the disappearance of 43 education students in the southern city of Iguala last year have all the resources they need to do their work, Mexican Attorney General Arely Gomez said.

“We are providing all the facilities so they can carry out their work plan,” Gomez told Radio Formula.

Gomez said that after taking office last week, she met with the IACHR experts, who are from Spain, Chile, Colombia and Guatemala. The IACHR team arrived in Mexico last week to investigate the disappearance of the 43 students, who went missing on Sept. 26.

And from teleSUR, an occupation:

Ayotzinapa Families ‘Occupy’ Mexican TV Station

  • The parents of the disappeared 43 students protested against television giant, Televisa, demanding ethical coverage of their movement.

Parents and family of the disappeared 43 Ayotzinapa students led a march in the Mexican Capital to symbolically occupy the headquarters of the private television giant, Televisa, demanding that the media company offer them a so-called “right of reply.”

According to the families of the youth, Televisa, which owns more than 70% of the televised market in Mexico, has portrayed them and their movement under an editorial line that “criminalizes” them.

The families demand that a commission of parents be given access to the broadcaster to make more visible their movement to secure truth and justice in the enforced disappearance of their children which occurred in September in Iguala, Guerrero.

Via Rebeluis, our Ayotzinapa image of the day, featuring one of the mothers of the missing students:

BLOG Ayotz

Reuters covers a release:

Mexico court frees vigilante leader involved in fatal firefight

A judge in the violent Mexican state of Michoacan has ordered that a jailed vigilante leader involved in a firefight late last year that killed 10 people should be freed, a spokeswoman for the state judiciary said on Monday.

Hipolito Mora and his followers clashed in mid-December with a band led by Luis Antonio Torres, alias “El Americano,” a former vigilante leader turned rural police commander.

The shootout took place in La Ruana, a town about 150 miles (240 km) from Morelia, the state capital. Both men and 35 others were arrested in January and they have been behind bars ever since. Mora’s son was among the 10 killed in the shootout.

On Monday, a Michoacan state judge ordered that Mora and his 26 followers should be released, arguing they had acted in legitimate self-defense, said the spokeswoman, who asked not to be identified.

And from the Latin American Herald Tribune, an assassination foiled:

Gunmen Try to Kill Mayor of Mexican Border City

Matamoros Mayor Leticia Salazar Vazquez was not hurt in an attack by gunmen over the weekend, Mexican officials said. Four suspects have been arrested in connection with the attack, the Tamaulipas Coordination Group said.

Salazar Vazquez was “entering Matamoros from the western sector” around 8:10 p.m. Sunday when she was attacked, the security agency said.

The gunmen, who were riding in an automobile and an SUV, opened fire “on a vehicle carrying her bodyguards,” the Tamaulipas Coordination Group said.

The News.mx covers another problem:

Mexico open to eradicate torture

Mexico government reaffirmed its commitment to “prevent and eradicate cases of torture and mistreatment” and “punish all those who disobey their obligations to enforce human rights,” said Mexico’s permanent representative to the United Nations offices in Geneva, Jorge Lomónaco.

Juan Méndez, the United Nations Special Investigator Against Torture, submitted a report Monday to the Human Rights Council detailing his findings during his visit to Mexico between April 21 and May 2. He recommended that the Mexican government publicly recognize the size of this problem.

According to Méndez, whose report was debated in the Council Monday, torture and mistreatment “are generalized” in Mexico and occur “during the moments following detention and before standing trial,” with the purpose of “punishing or extracting confessions or information.”

And to close, via teleSUR English, another sellout temporarily halted:

Mexico: Vote delayed on water privatization law

Program notes:

A vote in Mexico’s House of Representatives on the new water administration and distribution bill scheduled for Tuesday has been delayed for the official purpose of clearing up “doubts and misunderstandings.” Critics say the initiative backed by private industry, especially the mining and energy sectors, is an attempt to privatize the resource. At issue is the practice of hydraulic fracturing, which requires enormous amounts of water. A protest demonstration was organized outside the House of Representatives today. Clayton Conn reports from Mexico City for teleSUR.

John Oliver strikes again: America’s territorials


HBO’s Last Week Tonight with John Oliver does it again, this time sending up the idiotic rationales for denying full citizens to the inhabitants of the widespread island territories of the United States:

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: U.S. Territories

Program notes:

A set of Supreme Court decisions made over 100 years ago has left U.S. territories without meaningful representation. That’s weird, right?

What is particularly striking is that passport held up by one Samoan declaring that he is an American national but not a citizen. Add to that the racist rationale originally used for denying voting rights to island territorials, and you have a perfect analogy to the state of Jews in Germany after passage of the Nuremberg laws, where they were treated as non-citizens deprived of civil rights and given passports marked with their status.

The watery demands of what we consume


A fascinating video, with links to scientific journal article [free] at the links.

From Grist:

Here’s how much water goes into making your food

Program notes:

Want to know how much water goes into your burger or beer? We compiled some data from several Water Footprint reports for your viewing pleasure.

To explore the data more, check out these reports:

InSecurityWatch: Spooks, vandals, war, hacks


We begin with consideration from the New York Times:

Holder Weighs Dismantling the Ferguson Police Dept.

Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. vowed a firm response on Friday to what he called “appalling” racial misconduct by law enforcement officials in Ferguson, Mo., suggesting he was prepared to seek the dismantling of the police force there if necessary.

“We are prepared to use all the powers that we have, all the power that we have, to ensure that the situation changes there,” Mr. Holder told reporters here after returning from Columbia, S.C., where he appeared with President Obama at a town hall-style meeting at Benedict College. “That means everything from working with them to coming up with an entirely new structure.”

Asked if that included dismantling the police force, Mr. Holder said: “If that’s what’s necessary, we’re prepared to do that.”

From the Intercept, notable spooky news:

Documents Shine Light on Shadowy New Zealand Surveillance Base

Near the heartland of New Zealand’s renowned wine country, there is a place that visitors are not allowed to go. The peculiar large white domes that protrude from the earth in the Waihopai Valley are surrounded by razor wire and shrouded in secrecy.

But now, newly revealed documents from the National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden shine a light on what is behind the security perimeter. The buildings there are crammed with sophisticated NSA spying technology, used by New Zealand to sweep up text messages, emails, phone calls, and other communications in bulk across the Asia-Pacific.

The documents, revealed Saturday by the Sunday Star-Times in collaboration with The Intercept, show how closely New Zealand has worked with the NSA to maintain surveillance coverage of the region. The files also offer an unprecedented insight into the Waihopai base, exposing how it’s been integrated into a global eavesdropping network.

The spying station intercepts data from satellites, and is operated by Government Communications Security Bureau, or GCSB, New Zealand’s equivalent of the NSA. Waihopai is part of a group of surveillance stations used by the so-called Five Eyes, an alliance that New Zealand is part of alongside the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, and Canada.

CBC News covers options exercised:

Counter-terrorism work has ‘sidetracked’ 300 RCMP criminal probes

  • RCMP head Bob Paulson says he hopes full, unedited Zehaf-Bibeau video will be released eventually

RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson says he thinks the full, unedited version of Parliament Hill shooter Michael Zehaf-Bibeau’s self-filmed video will eventually be released.

In an interview airing Saturday morning on CBC Radio’s The House, host Evan Solomon asked Paulson if 18 seconds from the beginning and end of the video made on the day of the shooting would one day be made public by police.

“I think so, eventually. I would like to think so,” he said. “I can’t give you a time estimate, I don’t think anything is lost in terms of what Canadians are seeing from Zehaf-Bibeau.”

Next, a fusion, via BBC News:

Nigeria’s Boko Haram pledges allegiance to Islamic State

Nigerian militant group Boko Haram has pledged allegiance to Islamic State (IS), according to an audio statement. The message, which could not immediately be verified, was posted on Boko Haram’s Twitter account and appeared to be by the group’s leader.

Boko Haram began a military campaign to impose Islamic rule in northern Nigeria in 2009. The conflict has since spread to neighbouring states. It would be the latest in a series of groups to swear allegiance to IS.

Boko Haram’s insurgency has threatened Nigeria’s territorial integrity and triggered a humanitarian crisis. It has carried out frequent bombings that have left thousands dead and has also attacked targets in the capital, Abuja.

From the Guardian, yet another attempt to reboot history — a UNESCO World Heritage Site:

Isis militants destroy remains of Hatra in northern Iraq

  • 2,000-year-old city has been demolished, says tourism and antiquities ministry

Islamic State militants have bulldozed ancient remains of the 2,000-year-old city of Hatra in northern Iraq.

An official said the tourism and antiquities ministry had received reports from its employees in Mosul, which is controlled by the radical Islamist group, that the site at Hatra had been demolished.

A nearby resident said he heard a powerful explosion early on Saturday and that neighbours had reported that Isis militants had destroyed some of the larger buildings in Hatra and were bulldozing other parts.

The destruction follows a similar incident this week when Isis fighters bulldozed the ancient Assyrian archaeological site of Nimrud, south of Mosul. Some of the works had survived for more than 1,500 years.

Here’s a video tour of what once was, via UNESCO:

Hatra (UNESCO/NHK)

Program notes:

A large fortified city under the influence of the Parthian Empire and capital of the first Arab Kingdom, Hatra withstood invasions by the Romans in A.D. 116 and 198 thanks to its high, thick walls reinforced by towers. The remains of the city, especially the temples where Hellenistic and Roman architecture blend with Eastern decorative features, attest to the greatness of its civilization.

From the Observer, archaeological anxiety spreads:

Isis vandalism has Libya fearing for its cultural treasures

  • With five World Heritage sites and historical remains stretching back to before Roman times, archaeologists worry a unique legacy may be lost

The Libyan capital of Tripoli lies more than 1,700 miles from the ancient Iraqi city of Nimrud. But for Mustafa Turjman, head of archaeological research at the University of Tripoli, the reported destruction of Nimrud’s ruins last week by the bulldozers of Islamic State (Isis) must have seemed rather closer to home.

For Libya, like Iraq, is home to a prized array of temples, tombs, mosques and churches, including five Unesco world heritage sites. And Libya, like Iraq, is racked by a complex civil war in which Isis plays a key role.

“Everything is unpredictable,” Turjman told the Observer. “But our heritage is in danger and it’s very difficult to protect it. We [academics] can protect it through restoration, but to protect it from people and explosions is very difficult. Sites, in particular in the centre and populated areas, are very endangered and very much at risk.”

The Washington Post covers the predictable:

Strains plague Iraqi, U.S. assessments of long-term fight against Islamic State

Signs of strain have emerged recently between the United States and Iraq over the timetable and military components of a campaign to retake major population centers occupied by the Islamic State.

Defense Secretary Ashton B. Carter told Congress this week that the U.S. Central Command was “inaccurate” when it told reporters recently that an offensive in Mosul could begin as early as April. But that timeline had already provoked a retort from Carter’s Iraqi counterpart, who said the United States was “not familiar” with Iraq’s battle plan for the northwestern city.

Speaking at a news conference late last month, Iraqi Defense Minister Khaled al-Obeidi said that Baghdad would determine the timing for the Mosul offensive.

From VICE News, more cadaverous messaging:

Islamic State Hangs Corpses Over Iraq City Entrance During Tikrit Battle

Islamic State militants hung the bodies of men believed to be Iraqi soldiers at the entrance to the town of Hawija in northern Iraq. In a video posted to Youtube, the corpses are shown strung from Hawija’s gates as vehicles passed below.

Witnesses quoted by local Iraqi reports said the bodies, strung upside down, were bodies of Iraqi government soldiers killed while battling ISIS forces in Tikrit, located about 74 miles away.

The gruesome display comes as Iraqi troops and allied Shiite militias mount a massive push to retake Tikrit from Islamic State fighters. Approximately 30,000 troops used jets and helicopters to try to push into the Islamic State-held city that is only 100 miles from Baghdad. Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi announced the assault on Tikrit last Sunday during a press conference.

The Washington Post considers things to come:

U.S. sees even bigger test for Iraq and Iran in the aftermath of Tikrit battle

The top U.S. military officer will press the government of Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi during a visit to Iraq this week about its plans for avoiding sectarian fallout once the Iranian-backed operation to dislodge the Islamic State from the city of Tikrit concludes.

Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said he was confident that Iraq would ultimately defeat the Sunni militants in Tikrit, a largely Sunni city north of Baghdad. He said the group’s fighters numbered only in the hundreds there, while the force of Iraqi troops and Iranian-backed militia fighters advancing on the city stands around 23,000.

“The important thing about this operation in the Tikrit in my view is less about how the military aspect of it goes and more about what follows,” he told reporters ahead a visit to Iraq, where he will meet with Iraq’s Shiite-led government. “Because if the Sunni population is then allowed to continue to live its life the way it wants to, and can come back to their homes … then I think we’re in a really good place.”

Mediterranean escalation, via Reuters:

EU considers bigger naval presence to tackle Libya security issues

The European Union is discussing with the United Nations ways to bolster security in Libya, including a naval presence, if U.N.-backed peace talks lead to a settlement, the EU’s foreign policy head said on Saturday.

Libya’s warring factions had held talks on Thursday in an effort to end a conflict between two rival governments that threatens to drive the country into full-blown civil war.

The EU currently has ships that patrol the Mediterranean Sea to help rescue migrants trying to flee from Libya and other North African countries. But Federica Mogherini said this presence could go further.

From Reuters again, more Libyan anxiety:

U.N. experts concerned Libya arms could be diverted to militias

U.N. sanctions monitors said on Friday they are concerned that if a United Nations Security Council committee approves a request by Libya’s government for weapons, tanks and jets, some of the equipment could be diverted to militias supporting them.

The experts, who monitor violations of an arms embargo imposed on Libya in 2011, said in a letter – obtained by Reuters – that arms could also end up in the hands of other militia after battles or if Libyan troops lose control of stockpiles.

Libya’s internationally-recognized government of Prime Minister Abdullah al-Thinni has operated out of the east since a rival armed faction called Libya Dawn took over Tripoli in fighting last year and set up its own administration.

After the jump, Morsi supporters executed in Egypt, the U.N. Human Rights Council takes up the cause of privacy, the Internet of [hacked] Things, a lie-detecting app for corporate execs, the Saudis spurn blogger-flogging critics, on to the Boko Haram front with a suicide bombing assault in Nigeria and women protesting in Niger, the lynching of an alleged Indian rapist results in a trucker boycott, China jails women activists on the eve of International Women’s Day, an anti-hijab warning in eastern China, on to Tokyo and a hint Shinzo Abe may scale back remilitarization legislation, support for Abe’s agenda on the rise, Tokyo and Taipei ink a Game of Zones fishing pact, and mixed messaging inn the Okinawa/Tokyo feud over a U.S. base move, plus hints the Pope may help solve a four-decade-old murder mystery. . . Continue reading

EnviroWatch: Outbreaks, climate, oil, & nukes


We begin with an epidemiological warning in Casa esnl’s neighborhood via Outbreak News Today:

Berkeley officials warn of possible measles exposure at local libraries

Just one week after Berkeley health officials warned of a possible measles exposure at the La Mediterranee restaurant, city officials say an adult who may have measles (it has not yet been confirmed) was at the City of Berkeley West Branch Library throughout the day on February 27 and February 28, and was at the Central Branch Library on the afternoon of February 27 only.

Individuals who were at these locations could have been exposed. Patrons of these libraries during these dates should monitor themselves for symptoms until March 21. The risk is very slight for those who have received the recommended two doses of the measles vaccine.

On the days in question, the person had not yet developed the tell-tale rash -a circumstance that contributes to the rapid spread of the highly infectious, airborne virus- so did not know that the illness might be measles-. Symptoms can develop between 7 and 21 days after exposure to the virus.

From the Guardian, more on a story covered here in our previous EnviroWatch:

Health costs of hormone disrupting chemicals over €150bn a year in Europe, says study

  • Lower IQ, adult obesity and 5% of autism cases are all linked to exposure to endocrine disruptors found in food containers, plastics, furniture, toys, carpeting and cosmetics, says new expert study

Europe is experiencing an explosion in health costs caused by endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) that is comparable to the cost of lead and mercury poisoning, according to the most comprehensive study of the subject yet published.

Endocrine disruptors are chemicals that interfere with the human hormone system, and can be found in food containers, plastics, furniture, toys, carpeting and cosmetics.

The new series of reports by 18 of the world’s foremost experts on endocrine science pegs the health costs of exposure to them at between €157bn-€270bn (£113bn-£195bn), or at least 1.23% of the continent’s GDP.

“The shocking thing is that the major component of that cost is related to the loss of brain function in the next generation,” one of the report’s authors, Professor Philippe Grandjean of Harvard University, told the Guardian.

“Our brains need particular hormones to develop normally – the thyroid hormone and sex hormones like testosterone and oestrogen. They’re very important in pregnancy and a child can very well be mentally retarded because of a lack of iodine and the thyroid hormone caused by chemical exposure.”

And number for another outbreak, via Outbreak News Today:

Chikungunya cases rise by 9,000, most new cases from Colombia

While some countries in the Caribbeans have seen their chikungunya situation get under control, in fact Dominica declared their outbreak over earlier this week, some areas of South America are reporting an increase in cases of the mosquito borne viral disease.

During the past week, Colombia saw an increase of 7,848 cases bringing the country’s total to more than 185,000 suspected and confirmed cases, according to the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), by far the most on the continent.

Colombia has also reported three chikungunya related fatalities. Other South American countries seeing an increase in confirmed chikungunya cases include Bolivia (+45), Ecuador (+147) and Paraguay (+130).

Still anouther outbreak this time from StarAfrica:

Mozambique warns against the deadly dengue outbreak

Mozambique´s Health authorities in the northern province of Nampula have warned against outbreak of dengue, a deadly fever, that is transmitted by the bite of female mosquitoes and causes severe pain, reports said on Saturday.

State-controlled Radio Mozambique quotes the provincial health chief, Jocelina Clavete as saying that at least 90 samples of suspected cases were taken and analyzed at the hospital in Nampula, of which 50 percent tested positive. She said further laboratory tests are being carried out on suspected patients in the region.

There is no vaccine for dengue, which kills an estimated 20,000 people each year and infects up to 100 million around the world, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO). However, experts say the number of people infected each year could be more than three times the WHO estimate.

From the Guardian, dry resignation in the Golden State:

California farmers resign themselves to drought: ‘Nobody’s fault but God’s’

  • Despite efforts to dig deeper into the earth to get at diminishing groundwater, the spectre of desertification may cost Central Valley farmers too much to carry on

As California faces a likely fourth year of drought, demand for drilling in the Central Valley has exploded. Hammond’s company, Arthur & Orum, can barely keep up: its seven rigs are working flat-out, yet a white folder with pending requests is thicker than three telephone books.

The waiting list has grown to three years, leaving many farmers to contemplate parched fields and ruin in what has been one of the world’s most productive agricultural regions. It supplies half of America’s fruit, nuts and vegetables.

“We’re overwhelmed. We’re going crazy,” said Hammond. “Everyone is in a desperate situation. Everyone has a sad story.”

Arthur & Orum has bought an additional rig for $1.2m, and out-of-state drillers have moved into the area. But as drills criss-cross the landscape, boring ever deeper into the earth, there is a haunting fear: what if they suck up all the groundwater? What if, one day, the water runs out?

And CCTV America covers another kind of environmental devastation:

Patagonia forest fires may be worst in Argentina’s history

Program notes:

Fires have been raging in the thousands of years old forests of southern Argentina in Patagonia. While the operation to save the local environment is still on-going, the question is how and why the fires started in the first place. The Patagonia forest fires have been called the worst fires in the country’s history.

From the McClatchy Washington Bureau, on the wrong track?:

Derailments put oil train expansion in the crosshairs

After a BNSF Railway oil train derailed and burst into flames Thursday near Galena, Ill., at least one community group has asked the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to suspend permits for rail expansions along the upper Mississippi River.

Of the 70 oil trains a week that leave North Dakota’s Bakken region for coastal refineries, more than half of them funnel through a roughly 400-mile stretch from Minnesota’s Twin Cities to the Quad Cities on the Illinois-Iowa border.

BNSF and Canadian Pacific haul both crude oil and ethanol on both sides of the Mississippi River, and the region has become a bottleneck. BNSF alone plans to spend more than $780 million in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Illinois this year to add new track and improve signal systems.

Because the projects affect wetlands along the river, the railroads must seek permits under the federal Clean Water Act. And as elsewhere in the country, the permitting process has become a primary tool of community and environmental groups to slow or stop the growth of such rail shipments.

And a similar problem north of the border, via the Guardian:

Third oil train in less than a month derails in Ontario and starts fire

  • CN Rail has seen three derailments in Canadian province since 14 February
  • No injuries reported in Saturday blaze

Train operator CN Rail said on Saturday a train carrying crude oil had derailed in northern Ontario, setting off a fire at the site. There were no reports of injuries.

It is the third CN oil train derailment in northern Ontario in less than a month, and the second in the same area.

A CN spokeswoman, Emily Hamer, said the crew on the eastbound freight train reported that cars derailed about 2.45am near Gogama, Ontario, about 125 miles north of Sudbury. She said emergency crew were assessing the site and activating an emergency response plan. Photos on social media showed a large fireball at the site.

A CN freight train derailed on Thursday east of Hornepayne; on 14 February 29 cars of a CN freight train carrying crude oil derailed in a remote area south of Timmins, Ontario.

Obama notes an oily problem, via CBC News:

Canadian oil extraction is ‘extraordinarily dirty’ process, Obama says

  • Keystone XL pipeline vetoed by president in February

U.S. President Barack Obama has some less-than-laudatory words for Canada’s oil industry in a new example of his increasingly critical take on the oilsands.

He was asked about the Keystone XL pipeline during a town-hall session Friday — and he launched into an explanation of why so many environmentalists oppose it.

“The way that you get oil out in Canada is an extraordinarily dirty way of extracting oil,” Obama said during the event at a South Carolina college. “Obviously,” he added, “there are always risks in piping a lot of oil through Nebraska farmland and other parts of the country.”

After the jump, yet more oil woes — in the form of corruption — in Brazil, a deeply endangered species, on to Fukushimapocalypse Now!, first with watery woes, a reluctance to return, and California researchers get a look at the reactor [plus video], and another reminder of nuclear sins of the past. . . Continue reading

EbolaWatch: Curves, PTSD, orphans, tourism


As the outbreak ebbs, stories come fewer and farther between, and we begin today’s compilation with the latest cumulative case curves for the three hardest hit nations, via the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

BLOG Ebola cumulatives

From the Independent, another kind of casualty:

Sierra Leone athlete arrested in London for overstaying visa because Ebola killed his family

Sierra Leone’s best sprinter has been arrested after he was found living rough on the streets of London.

Jimmy Thoronka, 20, disappeared at the end of the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow last summer and said he could not return home because of the Ebola epidemic ravaging the country, and he has considered suicide.

He said his family have already died from the disease, which has killed 9,800 people in the three-worst hit countries.

Voice of America has more on the price paid by those left behind:

Sierra Leone Ebola Orphans Face Another Crisis

Program notes:

There’s growing concern about the future of an orphanage run by a British charity in Sierra Leone, after a staff member and his wife died this week from Ebola. The Saint George Foundation Orphanage in Freetown is now in quarantine, with more than 20 children and seven staff in lock-down. The BBC has agreed to share Ebola-related material with Voice of America because of the difficulties faced by media organizations reporting the crisis. Clive Myrie reports from Sierra Leone.

And StarAfrica has still more:

Liberia: Over 500,000 suffer mental illness due to war, Ebola — Official

At least 515,000 Liberians are suffering from mental illness as a result of the prolonged civil conflict and the Ebola outbreak in the country, a health official said on Friday.

The Chief Medical Officer of Liberia, Dr. Bernice Dahn said about 400,000 are suffering from mild mental illness, while 115,000 others have mental disorder.

The Liberia Chief Medical Officer made the disclosure Friday at a program marking the graduation of Mental Health Clinicians in Monrovia. The program is sponsored by the Carter Center.

She also attributed mental health to rape and other forms of sexual violence as well as substance abuse.

And another set of consequences, via AllAfrica:

Zimbabwe: Safari Operators Record 20 Percent Slump

SAFARI operators recorded an estimated 20% drop in revenue last year due to the ivory ban by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the outbreak of the Ebola virus, businessdigest has learnt.

In April last year, the USFWS announced a suspension on imports of sport-hunted African elephant trophies taken in Tanzania and Zimbabwe during the calendar year of 2014.

“In Zimbabwe, available data, though limited, indicate a significant decline in the elephant population. Anecdotal evidence, such as the widely publicised poisoning last year(2013) of 300 elephants in Hwange National Park, suggests that Zimbabwe’s elephants are also under siege,” the organisation said.

MexicoWatch: Parents, kidnaps, cartels, water


We begin with another story about the parents of missing students of the Raúl Isidro Burgos Rural Teachers’ College of Ayotzinapa, via teleSUR English:

Ayotzinapa parents set on searching military bases

Program notes:

The parents of the 43 forcibly disappeared students of the Ayotzinapa teacher training school have not given up on their demand to search for their loved ones on military bases. As federal officials continue to backtrack on their January promise to permit such a search, mounting evidence indicates some degree of military participation in the crimes committed against the students in Iguala, Guerrero, last September 26. Parents also point to documentation of the historic precedent of military participation in disappearances of activists, union leaders and guerrillas during the “dirty war” that began in the 1960s and continued for several decades. Clayton Conn reports for teleSUR.

From teleSUR, yet another Guerrero kidnaping:

Four Workers Kidnapped in Mexican State of Guerrero

  • Violent crime remains a major problem in Guerrero despite a build up of troops and federal police in the area by the Mexican president.

An armed group kidnapped four workers in the violence-plagued state of Guerrero, Mexico on Thursday night.

A statement by the attorney general’s office confirmed that four workers at a Mexico mine owned by Goldcorp Inc. had gone missing.

According to the attorney general’s office, an armed group intercepted the workers as they were leaving the site of the Los Filos mine in the municipality of Eduardo Neri.

From Borderland Beat, cartels and mining — a bad combination:

Mining Companies’ Rapacity Devastates Entire Villages in Coahuila

Sabinas is the center of coal mining country in northern Mexico called the carbonifera.  It is a relatively peaceful little city of about 50,000 people and a total population in the municipality (county) of about 60,000.   Cloete is a small village adjacent to the city of Sabinas and is where the Sabinas’ city dump (land fill) is located.

For the last decade or so it is believed that the Zeta cartel has been active in coal mining in the area and in the last few years possibly in control of the mining operations there since 2009.

José Reynol Bermea Castilla, who according to the Attorney General’s Office (PGR) is alleged to be the operator for Miguel Angel Trevino Morales, the Z-40, leader of Los Zetas in the illegal exploitation of coal mines in Coahuila, was recorded before a criminal court .

He was known as the #1 Zeta in Coahuila in charge of coal mining.   It has been reported that illegal coal mining generated between $500,000 to $1,000,000 a week for the Zetas.

Next, today’s Ayotzinapa image, via Noticias Ayotzinapa:

He's got a book! He's got a book!

He’s got a book! He’s got a book!

Mexico News Daily covers another debacle to tarnish the luster of the ever-brassy Enrique Peña Nieto:

Project questioned for cost, transparency

  • Monterrey aqueduct cost soars to 47 billion pesos

A federation of business owners and several non-governmental organizations have called for the postponement of a major water distribution project intended to serve the city of Monterrey.

Coparmex Nuevo León has proposed postponing the Monterrey VI aqueduct, alleging 15 irregularities in the project, from a massive increase in cost to lack of transparency.

President Alberto Fernández Martínez told a press conference that the biggest concern is the project’s soaring cost: it was initially estimated at 17.6 billion pesos, or US $1.1 billion. The latest figure is 46.9 billion.

Another irregularity is a lack of transparency, a concern that has been aggravated by the involvement of Grupo Higa, a company that has won many government contracts and whose owner has close ties with President Peña Nieto.

teleSUR covers yet another Peña privatization, following in the wake of legislation authorizing a partial privatization of the state oil monopoly:

Experts Warn Against Approval of Mexico’s Water Bill

  • Academics and experts have expressed their rejection to a proposed bill that will legalize the privatization of water distribution and administration

Legal and environmental experts warn of the negative short term and long term effects as well aslegal issues if Mexican lawmakers of the lower house approve a controversial bill that will make the private distribution and administration of water legal throughout the country.

“The law has many inconsistencies in terms of being constitutional,” said Maria del Carmen Carmona, a researcher at the Institute of Legal Investigations at Mexico’s National Autonomous University (UNAM),  in an interview with teleSUR. “It violates the human right to water and threatens the right to health and nutrition.”

According to Carmona current law recognizes the priority of water consumption for that of individual use, rather than for private interests. She affirms that the law seeks to change this priority, which could in turn permit greater degrees of pollution in the resource as well as a reduction for agricultural production.

The accompanying teleSUR English video report:

Mexico: Bill to privatize water distribution passes committee

Program notes:

The first steps in committee have been hurdled by ruling party lawmakers in Mexico for final approval of the General Water Law. The legislation would enable private companies to handle water distribution and infrastructure. Critics charge that it is a first step toward privatization of the precious resource. Social organizations are calling for mass demonstrations to oppose the bill. Clayton Conn reports from Mexico City.