Category Archives: Law

Headline of the day II: Is nothing sacred?


BLOG Gauloises

Back in the days when we were black turtlenecks and hing out in coffee shops [long before espressos and lattes were trendy], we’d buy the occasional pack of Gauloises because, well, all them French existentialists and jazz musicians smoked ’em. That or Gitanes [literally, Gypsies].

So did guys like Serge Gainsborough, one of our favorite directors.

But, alas, no more [even though we’ve given up the evil weed, save for the very occasional puff or too].

From the Guardian:

Smokers fume as France mulls ban on ‘too cool’ Gitanes and Gauloises

Tobacco firms demand clarification of new public health law that could see some brands outlawed for being too trendy

Chart of the day: Immigration polarization


From Gallup:

BLOG Immigrate

The urge to purge nets thousands in Turkey


The chaotic Turkish coup failure has been followed by what usually happens when coup;s fail [or succeed for that matter]: a massive purge.

And as usually happens when strong men rule, the urge to purge has spread to academia.

Call it political bulima.

From BBC News:

At least 45,000 people have been rounded up, sacked or suspended from their jobs by Turkey’s government in the wake of last week’s failed coup.

The purge of those deemed less than loyal to President Recep Tayyip Erdogan widened on Tuesday to include teachers, university deans and the media.

The government says they are allied to US-based cleric Fethullah Gulen, who denies claims he directed the uprising. PM Binali Yildirim said the preacher led a “terrorist organisation”.

“We will dig them up by their roots,” he told parliament.

Turkey is pressing the US to extradite Mr Gulen and the issue was raised during a phone call between US President Barack Obama and President Erdogan on Tuesday, the White House said.

Spokesman Josh Earnest said a decision on whether or not to extradite would be made under a treaty between the two countries.

Headline of the day II: And that’s the way it is. . .


Good for what Ailes us?

Roger, over and out.

A screencap of the London Daily Mail homepage teaser for this story:

BLOG Ailes

Resisting the Greek capitulation to the banksters


Greek’s have seen austerity at its worst, inflicted by the joint powers of the European Commission, the European Central Bank, and the International Monetary Fund.

The austerians are acting in the interest of the banks of Germany and France, lending institutions that bankrolled arms deals that profited the military/industrial complexes of the lender nations.

While Greek official corruption was clearly involved in some of the deals, the bribe payments came from German companies eager for profits from the sale of weapon systems, warships, and other materiel necessary for the new Cold War.

A succession of Greek governments signed off on massive cuts in public salaries and pensions, restrictions on the national public health system, and the sell-off of ports, railroads, islands, and other public assets.

Finally, the Greek people said “Enough!,” and in and in January 2015, they voted in a new government headed by a previously marginal party, a coalition of the Left named Syriza [previously], swept to power on a platform calling for an end of the payments.

With party leader Alexis Tsipras becoming chancellor, Syriza seemed on track to mount the first real resistance to the ave of austerity programs imposed on nations of Ireland and Southern Europe in the wake of the crash caused by the institutional corruption of Wall Street and the City of London.

Seven months after taking power, Syriza called a referendum on the issue of whether or not Greece should accept the latest austerity mandates from the Troika. When the votes were tallied, 61 percent of the Greek electorate declared no to further austerity.

Two months later the leaders of the anti-austerity movement were gone, and Tsipras was ready to surrender once again.

In this interview with The Real News Network, one of those leaders talks about those critical events, and the launch of a new party to continue the resistance to the money lord of the North:

Odious Debt and the Betrayal of the Popular Will in Greece

From the transcript:

DIMITRI LASCARIS, TRNN: This is Dimitri Lascaris reporting from Lesbos, Greece, for The Real News.

This week, The Real News is in Lesbos to cover the Crossing Borders Conference on the refugee crisis in the Mediterranean.

This afternoon we’re joined by Zoe Konstantopoulou. Zoe Konstantopoulou is the former speaker of the Greek Parliament. She was elected to that position in February of last year with a record number of votes from her fellow MPs, including, surprisingly, the support of the right-wing New Democracy Party. But her tenure as speaker of the Greek Parliament was short-lived. Her position was vacated in October of last year after the SYRIZA government decided to implement an austerity program that was even more severe than [the one that] over 60 percent of the population of Greece had rejected in a referendum in July of last year.

>snip<

LASCARIS: Now, last year, after the referendum in which over 60 percent of the Greek population effectively voted to reject an austerity program that was even less severe than what was ultimately implemented, the prime minister, Alexis Tsipras, called a snap election and there was a rebellion of the left wing of the SYRIZA party, and they formed another party called Popular Unity, which I understand you supported in the election that was held in September.

KONSTANTOPOULOU: I cooperated as an independent candidate with Popular Unity.

There’s more, after the jump. . . Continue reading

One crooked cop gets a major judicial takedown


The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s office has a long, troubled history of corruption at the top.

Back when esnl reported for the late, great Santa Monica Evening Outlook, Peter Pitchess had repeatedly won reelection as sheriff, and a high official in his department told esnl Pitchess was regularly seen gambling at an illegal casino in Marina del Rey. An official of the state Attorney General’s office told us Pitchess has received a deep discount on a Chicago mob-funded real estate investment.

Pitchess retired with a legally unblemished record, unlike a more recent incumbent, as the Los Angeles Times reports:

A federal judge on Monday threw out a plea agreement that would have given former Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca a maximum of six months in prison, saying the sentence was too lenient considering Baca’s role in obstructing an FBI investigation into the county jails.

Addressing a downtown courtroom packed with Baca’s supporters, U.S. District Court Judge Percy Anderson said the deal “would trivialize the seriousness of the offenses … the need for a just punishment [and] the need to deter others.”

Baca, 74, had pleaded guilty in February to a single charge of lying to federal investigators. But the former sheriff’s involvement in trying to derail the investigation reached further than that, Anderson said.

At stake was what the investigators were trying to expose, Anderson said: an “us-versus-them” culture in which deputies covered up for one another and responded to inmates with enough violence to send them to the hospital.

Headlines of the day: Whatever could go wrong?


First from the Los Angeles Times:

‘I hope to God I don’t have to use it,’ says a man who brought a gun to a Cleveland Donald Trump rally

Tyson Gross arrived at a Donald Trump rally on the Cleveland riverfront Monday with a plainly visible Glock pistol in a holster on his belt.

And then this, from BBC News:

US election: Gun ban sought at Republican convention

Cleveland police have asked Ohio’s governor to suspend open-carry gun rights during the Republican National Convention.