Map of the day: Consumption patterns in Europe


blog-euroconsumption

From Eurostat, which reports:

Actual Individual Consumption (AIC) is a measure of material welfare of households. Across the Member States in 2015, AIC per capita expressed in Purchasing Power Standards [PPS] varied from 53% of the European Union [EU] average in Bulgaria to 137% in Luxembourg.

Ten Member States recorded AIC per capita above the EU average in 2015. The highest level in the EU was recorded in Luxembourg, 37% above the EU average , ahead of Germany [more than 20% above]. They were followed by Austria, Denmark, Belgium, Finland, the United Kingdom, France, the Netherlands and Sweden which all recorded levels between 10% and 20% above the EU average.

AIC per capita for thirteen Member States lay between the EU average and 30% below. In Italy, Ireland and Cyprus, the levels were 10% or less below the EU average, while Spain, Lithuania, Portugal and Malta were between 10% and 20% below. The Czech Republic, Greece, Slovakia, Slovenia, Poland and Estonia were between 20% and 30% below the average.

Five Member States recorded AIC per capita more than 30% below the EU average. Latvia and Hungary were between 30% and 40% below, while Romania, Croatia and Bulgaria had AIC per capita more than 40% below the EU average.

Over the last three years, AIC per capita relative to the EU average remained relatively stable in a majority of Member States. However, clear increases have been registered in Romania [59% of the EU average in 2015 compared with 54% in 2013], Bulgaria [53% vs. 49%] and Lithuania [83% vs. 79%], as well as Estonia [71% vs .68%] . In contrast, the most noticeable decrease was recorded in Luxembourg [137% in 2015 vs. 145% in 2013], followed by the Netherlands [111% vs. 115%], Austria [119% vs. 123%] and Greece [77% vs. 80%].

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