Fighting to save the endangered white abalone


The iridescent interior of the abalone reveals why it's often used in jewelry and furniture inlays as mother of pearl. Via Wikipedia.

The iridescent interior of the abalone reveals why it’s often used in jewelry and furniture inlays as mother of pearl. Via Wikipedia.

The tastiest treat in California’s coastal waters is the abalone.

We dined on the delicious gastropod soon after arriving in the Golden State in 1967 and immediately fell in love with this succulent gastronomic treat.

But we won’t be dining on abalone anymore, in part because our seven dollar supper would now cost upwards of $75 dollar.

One major reason for the oceanic level of inflation is that the critters don’t exist in the numbers they once did, both because of over-harvesting and because of changes in the ocean environment wrought by climate change.

One variety is endangered, so rare that most living examples are found in marine labs.

And that brings us to our video report, a compelling, humor-punctuated narrative by Jennifer Hoffmeister, an enthusiastic postdoctoral scholar at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego, who delights in both the abalone and it’s deadliest marine predator, the octopus.

Prepare to be both informed and amused.

From University of California Television:

The Hungry Octopus and the Endangered Abalone

Program notes:

Scripps Institution of Oceanography’s Jennifer Hofmeister gives a lively account of why and how she is working to understand the behavior of octopuses in order to save California’s endangered white abalone, which faces extinction when the last adult generations die out within the next decade.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s