Mexican gov’t Aytozinapa claims hit once again


The disappearance of 43 students from the Raúl Isidro Burgos Rural Teachers’ College of Ayotzinapa after police opened fire on them on the night of 26 September 2014 [previously] remains an open sore on the Mexican body politic.

President Enrique Peña Nieto’s administration has been eager to sweep the presumptive massacre under the rug, or at least relegate the whole bloody mess to the past, but their own incompetence in stage-managing the coverup has been nothing less than inflammatory.

The government claims it has discovered the “historical truth,” claiming all the students were slain byu drug gang members and the bodies then incinerated in a dumping group with the ashes tossed into a nearby stream.

The latest revelation via teleSUR English:

An inquiry published Saturday has revealed that there is virtually no physical evidence to support the Mexican government’s version of the 2014 disappearance of 43 students traveling by bus to Mexico City. Government officials insist that a drug gang kidnapped the students at gunpoint, killed them and burned the bodies at a dumpsite near the southwestern town of Iguala, but the report, based on forensic records requested by the Associated Press, revealed no signs of a fire on the night in question.

But the notes of a forensic examination of the Cocula dumpsite in Guerrero state in western Mexico shows that investigators could not confirm a fire on the night that the students vanished on September 26, 2014. The AP obtained the documents under a freedom of information request permissible under Mexican law,

The AP inquiry is the latest in a series of independent investigations that undermines the Mexican government’s version of events. Police say that five suspects have confessed to the crimes but an international panel of experts earlier this year concluded that the confessions were obtained by torture.

Earlier this year the Argentine Forensic Anthropology Team (EAAF) found animal and human remains at the dumpsite but said none of the remains corresponded to the government’s allegation that the bodies were incinerated by members of the Guerreros Unidos cartel. The Attorney General’s Office in April presented evidence of a huge fire and the discovery of the remains of at least 17 adults but the bone fragments were too badly burned to identify, the Argentine team said.

The government’s handling of the case has triggered massive protests that include parents and friends of the students, trade unions and grassroots organizations who believe that law-enforcement authorities are complicit in the slayings of the 43 students, who had effectively stolen a bus, ironically enough, to attend the commemoration of a 1968 police massacre of students.

More from the Associated Press report:

The report from international fire experts convened by the government was obtained by The Associated Press through an open records request. It shows the experts found evidence the Cocula dump had been the site of at least five fires, but could not determine when. Remains of 17 people were also found, but it was unknown when they were burned.

“The duration and dates of the fires could not be established based on the available physical data,” the report said.

>snip<

There was no information about the identities of the 17 remains found, but it was known that the remote dump had become a place to dispose of bodies for some time in an area where hundreds have gone missing.

>snip<

The Argentine team had previously advised of shell casings that suddenly appeared at the site and were later touted by the government as evidence that the students were executed at the dump.

Santiago Aguirre, deputy director of the nonprofit Miguel Agustin Pro Juarez Center for Human Rights, which is representing the students’ families, said Friday the report displayed serious deficiencies and was part of “a deliberate attempt to fabricate a version not supported by scientific evidence.”

Before departing Mexico at the end of April, the team from the Inter-American Human Rights Commission urged the government to drop its theory and explore details in the investigation that point to other possible destinations for the students’ remains.

And because authorities failed to maintain control of the site, fabricated evidence could have been added to the already chaotic mix

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