Edward Bernays, propaganda, and conspiracy


Few left a deeper and more sinister mark on the history of the 20th Century than Edward Bernays [previously], the man who played a critical role in the molding of public opinion, devising strategies that would be employed by corporations, political parties, governments, and intelligence agencies to mold and shape public opinion.

In this latest episode of The Empire Files, Abby Martin’s series for teleSUR English, New York University Professor of Media, Culture and Communication Mark Crispin Miller talks with Martin about Bernays and the legacy he left.

Miller’s perceptions about the harnessing of the mainstream media into a tool for shaping public sentiment and behavior contrary to the interests of the many for the profit of the few, often with lethal impact, goes a long way toward explaining many of tragedies of the world around us.

From teleSUR English:

The Empire Files: Propaganda and the Engineering of Consent

Program notes:

With thousands of advertisements seen by Americans everyday, and a corporate media that reinforces the needs of Empire, propaganda in the U.S. is more pervasive and effective than ever before.

The manipulation of public opinion through suggestion can be traced back to the father of modern propaganda, Edward Bernays, who discovered that preying on the subconscious mind was the best way to sell products people don’t need, and wars people don’t want.

To get a deeper understanding of how propaganda functions in today’s society, Abby Martin interviews Dr. Mark Crispin Miller, professor of Media Studies at New York University.

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