Category Archives: Photography

Street Seens: A remarkable Berkeley building


The run-down building at the northeast corner of the intersection of 65th Street and San Pablo Avenue in Berkeley has been transformed into what is perhaps the city’s most remarkable display of street art. We dodged traffic to grab a few shots.

And, as usual, click on the images to enlarge:

We begin with the fence to the north of the building facing San Pablo Avenue:

27 July 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 6.9 mm, 1/1300 sec, f3.9

27 July 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 6.9 mm, 1/1300 sec, f3.9

Next up, the building’s northern wall, which largely escapes the attention of passers-by:

27 July 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 6.9 mm, 1/1300 sec, f3.9

27 July 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 6.9 mm, 1/1300 sec, f3.9

The next four shots feature two scenes from the building’s San Pablo Avenue footage, first with this strange critter:

27 July 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 4.3 mm, 1/320 sec, f4

27 July 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 4.3 mm, 1/320 sec, f4

Next, more of the frontage:

27 July 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 13.3 mm, 1/400 sec, f5

27 July 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 13.3 mm, 1/400 sec, f5

And a detail of a door critter with a Freudian nose:

27 July 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 5.4 mm, 1/400 sec, f3.6

27 July 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 5.4 mm, 1/400 sec, f3.6

And this hidden detail, on the side of column, may explain the nasal condition:

27 July 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 5.4 mm, 1/400 sec, f4

27 July 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 5.4 mm, 1/400 sec, f4

Next, the western half of the building’s southern wall:

27 July 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 6.9 mm, 1/800 sec, f3.9

27 July 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 6.9 mm, 1/800 sec, f3.9

And the eastern half:

27 July 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 4.8 mm, 1/1000 sec, f4

27 July 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 4.8 mm, 1/1000 sec, f4

A detail:

27 July 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 41.3 mm, 1/500 sec, f5.6

27 July 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 41.3 mm, 1/500 sec, f5.6

And, finally, the fence to the southeast:

27 July 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 41.3 mm, 1/500 sec, f5.6

27 July 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 41.3 mm, 1/500 sec, f5.6

From NASA: A Solar Filament Erupts


Via Astronomy Picture of the Day. And do click on the image to enlarge to its full spectacularity:

BLOG Solar flare

Explanation:

What’s happened to our Sun? Nothing very unusual — it just threw a filament. Toward the middle of 2012, a long standing solar filament suddenly erupted into space producing an energetic Coronal Mass Ejection (CME). The filament had been held up for days by the Sun’s ever changing magnetic field and the timing of the eruption was unexpected. Watched closely by the Sun-orbiting Solar Dynamics Observatory, the resulting explosion shot electrons and ions into the Solar System, some of which arrived at Earth three days later and impacted Earth’s magnetosphere, causing visible aurorae. Loops of plasma surrounding an active region can be seen above the erupting filament in the ultraviolet image. Over the past week the number of sunspots visible on the Sun unexpectedly dropped to zero, causing speculation that the Sun has now passed a very unusual solar maximum, the time in the Sun’s 11-year cycle when it is most active.

Street seens: Images from the Berkeley Pier


For our first entry after a long delay [computer problems, now hopefully solved] some street art, for the most part shot on the city’s fishing pier at the Berkeley Marina. . .

First up, an enigmatic offering:

15 June 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 1600, 6.1 mm, 1/15 sec, f3.7

15 June 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 1600, 6.1 mm, 1/15 sec, f3.7

Next, a face to remember:

15 June 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 500, 4.3 mm, 1/15 sec, f3.3

15 June 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 500, 4.3 mm, 1/15 sec, f3.3

A high flyer takes wing:

15 June 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 320, 4.3 mm, 1/60 sec, f3.3

15 June 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 320, 4.3 mm, 1/60 sec, f3.3

Cosa Nostra or cozy nostrum?:

15 June 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 1600, 4.3 mm, 1/60 sec, f3.3

15 June 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 1600, 4.3 mm, 1/60 sec, f3.3

Another enigma:

15 June 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 1600, 11 mm, 1/15 sec, f4.8

15 June 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 1600, 11 mm, 1/15 sec, f4.8

And a warrior takes up his arms:

15 June 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 1250, 4.8 mm, 1/15 sec, f3.4

15 June 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 1250, 4.8 mm, 1/15 sec, f3.4

Younger daughter catches another form of art:

15 June 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 320, 4.3 mm, 1/160 sec, f3.3

15 June 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 320, 4.3 mm, 1/160 sec, f3.3

And for our final image, another kind of street art, closer to home on Shattuck Avenue:

25 June 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 35.6 mm, 1/200 sec, f5.5

25 June 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 35.6 mm, 1/200 sec, f5.5

Sadie Rose, happy as a clam with her new digs


Grandma just sent a new snap of the apple of our eye after Sadie’s mom and dad move into their new digs in Los Angeles, necessitated by her arrival and the need for more space.

So we indulge a Grandpa’s prerogative and share it with the world:

BLOG Saide Rose

Our candidates of the day for liquidation. . .


Yeah, why not?

When corporations do malicious things that reek of patent [in both senses] absurdity motivated solely by greed, let’s liquidate them. Or better yet, let’s give their ownership over to the community of folks who’ve been vicitmized by their depredations.

And in that light, we bring you a delightfully bile-arousing clip from Abby Martin’s Breaking the Set:

Program notes:

Abby Martin goes over the top 5 most ridiculous patents in the US, citing everything from Amazon’s patent of white background photography to Apple’s patent of the shape of a rectangle all leading to the rise of patent trolling and a complete abuse of the system.

Street Seens: Spring in Berkeley, plus one


Just some random shots, three of flowers one of the ocean, grabbed during strolls.

First up, just a red, red rose. . .

Panasonic DMC-ZS19 3 May 2014, ISO 100, 20.6 mm, 1/250 Sec, f5.3

Panasonic DMC-ZS19 3 May 2014, ISO 100, 20.6 mm, 1/250 Sec, f5.3

And another rose, paler in hew. . .

Panasonic DMC-ZS19 3 May 2014, ISO 100, 5.4 mm, 1/125 Sec, f3.5

Panasonic DMC-ZS19 3 May 2014, ISO 100, 5.4 mm, 1/125 Sec, f3.5

Some more flowers, both botanic and carved into fence stakes by a neighbor. . .

Panasonic DMC-ZS19 3 May 2014, ISO 160, 7.4 mm, 1/250 Sec, f3.9

Panasonic DMC-ZS19 3 May 2014, ISO 160, 7.4 mm, 1/250 Sec, f3.9

And finally, the San Francisco coast near sunset, with a hang glider high overhead. . .

Panasonic DMC-ZS19 3 May 2014, ISO 160, 4.3 mm, 1/1300 Sec, f3.3

Panasonic DMC-ZS19 3 May 2014, ISO 160, 4.3 mm, 1/1300 Sec, f3.3

Droned: Is this a $10,000 storm damage video?


That’s the question currently confronting the Federal Aviation Administration, which is looking closely at whether and how its rules apply to small drones used by photographers to capture news videos and stills.

The basic rule seems to be that you can send you camera drones aloft, but only if you’re not usually them commercially, but many questions remain. . .

First up, the footage in question, shot by Brian Emfinger:

Arkansas Tornado Damage Aerial Video 4-27-2014

Program note:

Drone video I shot right after the tornado moved through just south of Mayflower, Arkansas. Continue to follow KATV for the latest information and tomorrow we will have more drone video.

And the story, from PetaPixel:

FAA ‘Looking Into’ $10,000 Fine for Using Drone to Document Tornado Damage

In an effort to document the intense and widespread damage of the tornados that ripped through Arkansas this past week, storm chaser and videographer Brian Emfinger made use of a drone, flying it above the damage and rescue efforts to bring to light just how bad the damage was. Unfortunately for Emfinger, the Federal Aviation Administration may have an issue with his drone use.

The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette is reporting that the FAA is indeed investigating the situation of Emfinger’s use of the drone (as well as other entities who made use of drones).

However, just as the video brought to life some controversy on the use of drones, the FAA’s investigation has also brought some controversy with it — specifically questions regarding the First Amendment and the agency’s ability to impose its rules over the right of freedom of press.

The potential fine could be upwards of $10,000 if any of the storm chasers or journalists who covered the storm and damage using a drone are indeed fined, but the FAA is walking on some slippery slopes if it does intend to enforce the fines. Laywer Greg McNeal writes at Forbes that “many news organizations, lawyers [...], and other drone enthusiasts would be united in opposition to the agency’s efforts to enforce non-existent rules.”