Category Archives: Photography

Image of the day: The colors of light from space


From NASA Earth Observatory:

BLOG Lux

Explanation:

The Many Colors of Electric Lights

As anyone who has stood in a hardware store knows, light bulbs come in a wide range of types and colors. Incandescent bulbs have a warm glow similar to sunlight, while more energy efficient gas-discharge bulbs come in a variety of shades.

Some of the differences in artificial lighting are visible in photographs taken by astronauts aboard the International Space Station. For instance, several distinct colors of electric light are visible in this image of the Tsushima Strait, the shallow body of water that separates southern Japan and South Korea. A member of the Expedition 37 crew took this photograph on October 11, 2013.

A cluster of fishing boats is the source of the bluish light near the center of the image. The fisherman are likely luring Todarodes pacificus—a species known as the Japanese flying squid—to the surface with bright xenon bulbs. The city lights on the Korean side of the strait tend to have an orange glow, while those on the Japanese side are greener. The difference is related to the distribution of mercury vapor, metal halide, and high-pressure sodium lamps—the bulb types most often used for street and outdoor lightning. Mercury vapor lights tend to be green, high-pressure sodium is orange, and metal-halide lamps are bright white.

Astronaut photograph ISS037-E-12066 was acquired on October 11, 2013, with a Nikon D3S digital camera using a 50 millimeter lens, and is provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations Facility and the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit, Johnson Space Center. The image was taken by the Expedition 37 crew. It has been cropped and enhanced to improve contrast, and lens artifacts have been removed. The International Space Station Program supports the laboratory as part of the ISS National Lab to help astronauts take pictures of Earth that will be of the greatest value to scientists and the public, and to make those images freely available on the Internet. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA/JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Caption by Adam Voiland.

Sadie Rose pays Grandpa a visit


Along with Mom, Dad [not visible] and Grandma, for a bite to eat at Berkeley’s La Pena:

3 October 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 1600, 4.3 mm, 1/25 sec, f3.3

3 October 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 1600, 4.3 mm, 1/25 sec, f3.3

Heavens above! Time lapse celestial videos


First up, via NASA’s Astronomy Picture of the Day:

A Total Lunar Eclipse Over Tajikistan

Program notes:

Video Credit & Copyright: Jean-Luc Dauvergne (Ciel et Espace); Music: Valère Leroy & Sophie Huet (Space-Music) Explanation: If the full Moon suddenly faded, what would you see? The answer during the total lunar eclipse of 2011 June was recorded in a dramatic time lapse video from Tajikistan. During a total lunar eclipse, the Earth moves between the Moon and the Sun, causing the moon to fade dramatically. The Moon never gets completely dark, though, since the Earth’s atmosphere refracts some light. As the above video begins, the scene may appear to be daytime and sunlit, but actually it is a nighttime and lit by the glow of the full Moon. As the moon becomes eclipsed and fades, the wind dies down and background stars can be seen reflected in foreground lake. Most spectacularly, the sky surrounding the eclipsed moon suddenly appears to be full of stars and highlighted by the busy plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. The sequence repeats with a closer view, and the final image shows the placement of the eclipsed Moon near the Eagle, Swan, Trifid, and Lagoon nebulas. Nearly two hours after the eclipse started, the moon emerged from the Earth’s shadow and its bright full glare again dominated the sky. The next total lunar eclipse will occur this Wednesday.

Next, from Greek photographer Konstantinos Vasilakakos via PetaPixel:

**The Milky Way**

From PetaPixel:

If you enjoy gazing up at the heavens and being in awe of how expansive the universe is, then here’s a time-lapse project you have to check out. It’s a beautiful time-lapse of the Milky Way by Greek photographer Konstantinos Vasilakakos (be sure to watch it in high definition).

While it’s not radically different from other Milky Way timelapse out there, it does a great job at capturing the scale of the night sky.

Vasilakakos tells us that this is most likely his last time-lapse project. Starting in May 2014, he spent months hiking out from his village (Petrilo, Greece) to capture photographs of the night sky away from light pollution.

For countless nights he would set up his Nikon D610 (with a Samyang 14mm f/2.8, Nikkor Af-S 50mm f/1.4, and Nikkor 70-200 f/2.8), cover himself with a goatwool blanket, and stare at the sky while his camera captured exposures.

He then turned the still frames into a timelapse, added some ethereal music, and put it onto the Web for the world to enjoy.

The writing on the wall. . .in Martinez


Captured on a newspaper wall during a drive around San Francisco Bay:

28 June 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 11.7 mm, 1/125 sec, f4.9

28 June 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 11.7 mm, 1/125 sec, f4.9

Southern Berkeley/North Oakland street seens


Some images captured on a stroll with younger daughter. . .

First, a face spotted by Samantha on the base of a freeway support. . .

14 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 800, 33.3 mm, 1/100 sec, f5.5

14 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 800, 33.3 mm, 1/100 sec, f5.5

Another face, spotted on the asphalt beneath out feet. . .

14 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 12.5 mm, 1/400 sec, f4.9

14 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 12.5 mm, 1/400 sec, f4.9

Another sidewalk vignette. . .

14 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 4.3 mm, 1/1000 sec, f3.3

14 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 4.3 mm, 1/1000 sec, f3.3

The ghost of a long-vacant neighborhood snack stand. . .

14 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 18.4 mm, 1/400 sec, f5.3

14 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 18.4 mm, 1/400 sec, f5.3

And light and shadow at play on a street tree bole. . .

14 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 24.4 mm, 1/320 sec, f5.4

14 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 100, 24.4 mm, 1/320 sec, f5.4

Image of the day: Tragedy in Amazonia


From NASA’s Earth Observatory:

Amazon Forest Fires

Amazon Forest Fires

Explanation and credits:

On an unusually cloud-free day at the height of the dry season, several fires were burning in Amazonia, giving rise to a broad smoke pall easily seen from the International Space Station (ISS). Parts of the ISS appear along the margins of the photo.

Against the backdrop of the dark green rainforest, several fires follow the major highway BR 163. Fires are set to clear patches of forest for agriculture, a process that reveals red-brown soils. A long line of newly cleared patches snakes east from BR 163 towards the remote valley of Rio Crepori.

Extensive deforested areas in Brazil’s state of Mato Grosso appear in tan across the top of the image. Fires show the advance of deforestation into the state of Pará, which is now second after Mato Grosso in terms of deforestation acreage.

Astronaut photograph ISS040-E-103496 was acquired on August 19, 2014, with a Nikon D3S digital camera using a 70 millimeter lens, and is provided by the ISS Crew Earth Observations Facility and the Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit, Johnson Space Center. The image was taken by the Expedition 40 crew. It has been cropped and enhanced to improve contrast, and lens artifacts have been removed. The International Space Station Program supports the laboratory as part of the ISS National Lab to help astronauts take pictures of Earth that will be of the greatest value to scientists and the public, and to make those images freely available on the Internet. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA/JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Caption by M. Justin Wilkinson, Jacobs, and Michael Trenchard, Barrios Technology, at NASA-JSC.

Berkeley Street Seens: A post-prandial stroll


Walking southbound on Shattuck Avenue, we encountered the abandoned. . .

13 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 1600, 35.6 mm, 1/125 sec, f5.5

13 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 1600, 35.6 mm, 1/125 sec, f5.5

BLOG Clothes

13 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 3200, 19.4 mm, 1/80 sec, f5.3

13 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 3200, 19.4 mm, 1/80 sec, f5.3

The broken. . .

13 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 800, 18.2 mm, 1/100 sec, f5.3

13 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 800, 18.2 mm, 1/100 sec, f5.3

The engimatic. . .

13 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 400, 13.3 mm, 1/60 sec, f4.9

13 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 400, 13.3 mm, 1/60 sec, f4.9

13 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 200, 6.9 mm, 1/200 sec, f3.9

13 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 200, 6.9 mm, 1/200 sec, f3.9

And the luminous. . .

13 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 800, 25.9 mm, 1/125 sec, f5.4

13 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 800, 25.9 mm, 1/125 sec, f5.4

13 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 1600, 10.3 mm, 1/60 sec, f4.7

13 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 1600, 10.3 mm, 1/60 sec, f4.7

13 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 160, 11.7 mm, 1/200 sec, f4.9

13 September 2014, Panasonic DMZ-ZS19, ISO 160, 11.7 mm, 1/200 sec, f4.9