Category Archives: Music

And then a butterfly decided to flutter by


One of those wondrous things you simply couldn’t script happened Monday during the Carl Nielsen International Music Flute Competition in Odense, Denmark.

Yukie Ota was performing Pierre Sancan’s Sonatine for Flute and Piano when an uninvited guest showed up.

From Kanal tilhørende Odensesymfoni:

Butterfly fails to faze flautist

The competition’s website describes what happened next:

Japanese flautist Yukie Ota had almost completed her programme in the first round of the 2014 Carl Nielsen International Music Flute Competition when a butterfly alighted on her hair. From there it proceeded to her forehead, where it perched for more than a minute as Ota played to the jury. Yukie Ota refused to let this extra company on the concert platform rattle her and simply went on playing. Meanwhile the butterfly remained put, enjoying the concert as it opened and closed its wings. And yes, it was a pretty sight.

While Ota’s full performance isn’t on line, here’s another performance of the French composer’s work via vlogger and flautist Ory Schneor:

Pierre Sancan – Sonatine for flute and piano – Ory Schneor – Flute

EbolaWatch: Dire warnings, campaigns, a song


We begin today’s coverage of the plague now stalking Africa with a dire prediction from Deutsche Welle:

Virologist: Fight against Ebola in Sierra Leone and Liberia is lost

  • The killer virus is spreading like wildfire, Liberia’s defense minister said on Tuesdayas he pleaded for UN assistance. A German Ebola expert tells DW the virus must “burn itself out” in that part of the world.

Jonas Schmidt-Chanasit of the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine in Hamburg told DW that he and his colleagues are losing hope for Sierra Leone and Liberia, two of the countries worst hit by the recent Ebola epidemic.

“The right time to get this epidemic under control in these countries has been missed,” he said. That time was May and June. “Now it is too late.”

Schmidt-Chanasit expects the virus will “burn itself out” in this part of the world. With other words: It will more or less infect everybody and half of the population – in total about five million people – could die.

Another apocalyptic warning, via Punch Nigeria:

2.1m Nigerians at risk —Report

A new research study by Britain’s University of Oxford has revealed that 2.1 million Nigerians are at risk of contracting the Ebola Virus Disease.

According to the latest study published on Monday, the Ebola virus can spread to at least 15 more countries in West and Central Africa, pushing up overall number of people at risk of infection to 70 million.

The research titled, ‘Mapping the zoonotic niche of Ebola virus disease in Africa,’ compared historic outbreaks to the virus’s possible transmission in bats and chimpanzees to project how the virus could spread through its animal reservoir.

The Associated Press tallies:

35 deaths attributed to Ebola outbreak in Congo

The World Health Organization says that an Ebola outbreak in Congo is thought to have killed 35 people of the more than 60 sickened.

Congo, the site of the world’s first recorded Ebola outbreak, has had several flare-ups of the disease over the years. Officials say the current outbreak is not related to another taking place in West Africa blamed for the deaths of more than 2,200 people.

The U.N. health agency said Thursday that the Congo outbreak is concentrated in one county, and all of the 62 people believed to have contracted Ebola so far have been linked to one initial case. It said isolation units have been set up in each of the four affected villages, in a remote area of the Central African country’s northwest.

From France 24, World Health Organization Ebola specialist Dr. Zabulon Yoti discusses measures needed to contain the outbreak [despite the title, that’s the focus]:

Ebola Epidemic – West African economies overwhelmed

From Punch Nigeria, enlisting support:

Yero meets religious leaders on anti-Ebola plans

Governor Mukhtar Yero of Kaduna State  on Thursday  held a meeting with Christian and Muslim  leaders to sensitise them  on the Ebola virus disease.

Yero, who noted that it was  part of efforts to curtail  the spread of the deadly virus to the state, also told the religious leaders that the government would train 13,000 teachers in both private and public schools in the state before the September 22 resumption date for schools on how to handle the Ebola issue.

Speaking further on the Ebola virus, the governor said since the virus was a “special disease”, government would also place special emphasis on tackling its spread to the state.

Yero cautioned the media against sensationalising the disease in their reportage, noting that rather, the media should be in the vanguard of  educating and enlightening residents of the state on the virus.

Liberian Observer conveys a recommendation:

‘Include Ebola Survivors on Task Forces’

  • WHO Consultant Suggests

A health consultant to the World Health Organization (WHO) assigned in Grand Cape Mount County, Dr. Akpaka Kalu, has called for the inclusion of Ebola survivors on the National Ebola Taskforce to educate citizens about the danger and prevention of the disease.

Dr. Kalu made the recommendation during the county’s Ebola Taskforce coordination meeting held on Wednesday in Sinje Town, Garwula District.

According to him, the inclusion of survivors on the taskforce was important, “because the survivors should be used as psycho-social counselors in the fight against the deadly epidemic.”

“Instead of bringing survivors on the taskforce,” Dr. Kalu lamented that unfortunately, the survivors are being stigmatized by Liberians rather than looking at them as resourced persons to educate others about the danger of the virus.

The Monrovia Inquirer covers an assessment:

Samukai Outlines Effects Of Ebola…Wants Support To Lift Travel Ban

Defense Minisrer, Brownie Samukai has outlined the effects of the deadly Ebola virus in Liberia.

Delivering a special statement at the United Nations Security Council, on Tuesday Minister Samukai said this “health emergency is affecting every sector of the Liberian society.”

Min. Samukai added that the nation’s economy has been very seriously disrupted. He said Local economic activities such as domestic food production, mining, and transport services have been undermined.

“Moreover, the slowdown in domestic food production, particularly in affected areas of the country, has negatively impacted food supply, thus triggering increasing demand for imported commodities, at higher prices, minister Samukai said.

From the Liberian Observer, some good news:

Firestone Medical Center Discharges 6 Ebola Survivors

The Firestone Medical Center in Duside on September 2 and 9, discharged six survivors from its Ebola Treatment Unit. The first patient, Madam Jenneh Farsue, the wife of a Firestone Liberia employee, contracted the deadly Ebola virus in July/August. She was discharged following several weeks of intensive medical care at the Firestone Hospital and after testing negative of the virus. Five more persons were discharged and reintegrated from Isolation into the communities on the 9th of September.

In addition to the hospital and Ebola Treatment Unit, Firestone Liberia also runs a reintegration program to help those returning to the community following isolation or treatment for Ebola. Speaking at the reintegration program for Mrs. Farsue in Division 28, Cubitts Community, Dr. Lyndon G. Mabande, the Medical Director of the Firestone Health Services, called on residents of the community to interact with Mrs. Farsue as they used to do and accept her back into the community because she is healthy. He described her recovery as “a true success story in the fight against the deadly Ebola virus.”

He called on his fellow teammates, residents and the general public to adhere to the preventive measures stipulated by the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare and the World Health Organization (WHO). Mabande further appealed to Liberians to stop the denial syndrome so people can be treated early, a key in the fight against Ebola. “Come to the hospital soon. If you come soon, with all we can put together, you may come home saved,” Dr. Mabande said. He also commended the medical staff for their work in the fight against this disease. “Let us continue to cooperate. If we work in isolation, we are not going to succeed, and it requires team work,” he told the gathering.

Punch Nigeria covers anger over austerity on the front lines:

Ebola outbreak: Anger in Lagos infectious diseases hospital

Members of staff of the Infectious Disease Hospital, Yaba, Lagos, have expressed anger over the impending removal of the hazard allowance component of their September salary. Sources within the hospital told our correspondent that the Lagos State government has excised the allowance, which has been paid for years in the September payroll.

“We have sighted the payroll for September already and there is no provision for this allowance which has been paid to us for more than four years. This is really terrible. If government wants to remove anybody’s allowance, should it be from us workers at the IDH? What kind of problem is this?” one of the workers of the hospital lamented.

Earlier, volunteers at the isolation ward had protested the non-payment of their daily allowance since August 30.

New Europe lends a hand:

UN allocates $3.8 million to support a UN air service operating in Ebola-struck West Africa

The United Nations humanitarian chief has allocated $3.8 million from an emergency fund to support a U.N. air service operating in the Ebola-struck West African region.

Valerie Amos said Wednesday that a reduction in commercial air flights as a result of the Ebola outbreak has hindered the urgent deployment of health workers and supplies.

She said the $3.8 million from the Central Emergency Response Fund will assist the U.N. Humanitarian Air Service, run by the World Food Program, to move humanitarian personnel, medical supplies and equipment and aid rapidly to remote locations in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone.

After the jump, a call for a military-like response from the North, anxieties over U.S. military “help,” a warning about corruption, Ebola fears Down Under, and another musical response. . . Continue reading

Jazz documentary: 10 Days that Shook Soho


Produced and directed by Robert Lemkin and Steven Cleary for Wadham Films, the 1986 BBC4 documentary has been reissued by Journeyman Pictures and is a treat for the ears and eyes.

Covering the very first Soho Jazz Festival in New York, the documentarians filmed both performances and the milieu, capturing a historic moment for theta most American of musical idioms.

The film is at once intimate and magisterial, eschewing narration for the scenes and sounds of both the event and the streets outside — in effect, letting evens narrate themselves. It’s a restraint that is all to rare in the documentary field and especially enjoyable given that the event is all about music.

As for the music, well, sit back, grab a glass of red or a doobie, and enjoy!

From Journeyman Pictures:

The 1986 Soho Jazz Festival

Program notes:

10 Days That Shook Soho (1986): A unique music documentary revealing the story of the inaugural 1986 Soho Jazz Festival.

Featuring live performances from:

Marie Murphy
Courtney Pine
Team Ten
Yes/No People
Stan Tracey
Marc Almond
Georgie Fame
Jazz Defektors
IDJ Dancers
Tommy Chase

Ebola: Music for a ravaged continent


People will sing about anything. Really. So it should come as no surprise that the Ebola virus has drawn the attention of African songsmiths.

We discovered two such creations whilst wandering through the ojuter reachers of the WW and decided to share them with you.

First up, a performance of his own Ebola song by an unnamed African street musician, via vlogger Neeraj Lalwani:

Ebola Song

Next for the artist De Cloud, with his own graphic additions:

De Cloud — Ebola Song

Next, via vlogger Darlington Tweh:

EBOLA SONG BY D12 2014

And finally, via Libdiamond, a song from noted Liberian musician:

Black Diamond – Ebola

Program note:

The track Ebola is an awareness track by Liberia’s international reggae artist Black Diamond. Produced by Theo Allen

Oakland youth take on fast food in a music video


Via Oakland Local, which reports that:

Teens working at the student-centered Muse Video unit of KDOL TV from nearby MetWest High School and Youth Uprising, both in Oakland, created the video, using tools and training from their internships at KDOL. The TV studio is a joint project of the Oakland Unified School District and Media Enterprise Alliance.

Are you Loving It is about a gang leader Ronald McDonald who hooks his recruits on fast food and makes them go out to street corners to sell sugary drinks and fatty chips, hooking yet more people. They succumb to these addictive substances.

Rap songwriter Alexis Johnson, a 19-year-old from Oakland whose pen name is L.L.D.B., wrote the  lyrics, inspired by the health problems in her family.

From Muse Video:

Muse Video Presents: Are You Loving It?

Program note:

Muse Video brings together young Oakland artists to take on the issue of fast food oppression! We worked with Oakland natives L.L.D.B., Taiwo Murray, and Pamela Arriera to create a song and music video taking on injustices in the food system.

For more music and news, check out our website at MuseVideo.net!

Quote of the day: Obama’s choice of enemies


From Glenn Greenwald, writing at The Intercept:

For those who ask “what should be done?,” has the hideous aftermath of the NATO intervention in Libya – hailed as a grand success for “humanitarian interventions” – not taught the crucial lessons that (a) bombing for ostensibly “humanitarian” ends virtually never fulfills the claimed goals but rather almost always makes the situation worse; (b) the U.S. military is not designed, and is not deployed, for “humanitarian” purposes?; and (c) the U.S. military is not always capable of “doing something” positive about every humanitarian crisis even if that were really the goal of U.S. officials?

The suffering in Iraq is real, as is the brutality of ISIS, and the desire to fix it is understandable. There may be some ideal world in which a superpower is both able and eager to bomb for humanitarian purposes. But that is not this world. Just note how completely the welfare of Libya was ignored by most intervention advocates the minute the fun, glorious, exciting part – “We came, we saw, he died,” chuckled Hillary Clinton – was over.

It is simply mystifying how anyone can look at U.S. actions in the Middle East and still believe that the goal of its military deployments is humanitarianism. The U.S. government does not oppose tyranny and violent oppression in the Middle East. To the contrary, it is and long has been American policy to do everything possible to subjugate the populations of that region with brutal force – as conclusively demonstrated by stalwart U.S. support for the region’s worst oppressors. Or, as Hillary Clinton so memorably put it in 2009: “I really consider President and Mrs. Mubarak to be friends of my family.”

How can anyone believe that a government whose overt, explicit policy is “regime continuity” for Saudi Arabia, and who continues to lend all sorts of support to the military dictators of Egypt, is simultaneously driven by humanitarian missions in the region?

Which reminds us, naturally, of a song — specifically, “Kill for Peace” by the Fugs, that merry band of 60s misfits who brought devious delights to counterculture types [including, we must note, a young esnl] by their subversive lyrics and style.

In this clip from the 1971 film W.R.: Mysteries of the Organism, Fugs cofounder Tuli Kupferberg cavorts around Wall Street and environs, alarming banksters and brokers as the Fugs classic plays out:

Via vlogger The Redemption Songs:

The Fugs: Kill for Peace

In waging cover war on Syria and overt war on Iraq. we have sown dragon’s teeth and reaped the whirlwind, leaving the United States to either fight an endless series of brushfire wars or [dare we hope] seek some way out of the mess that doesn’t involve endless slaughter and misery for those who we professed to help.

And whuile we;re at it, via vlogger Dn310 , another appropriate Fugs classic:

The Fugs: CIA Man

Program notes:

The Fugs is a rock/protopunk group formed in the 1960’s. This song is featured on their debut album “The Fugs First Album”. Most recently the song can be heard during the end credits on the movie “Burn after Reading” by the Coen brothers.

UPDATE: Just found another clip, an excerpt from a 14 July 1968 appearance on Swedish television featuring surreal autobiographies of the band members and a performance of “I Couldn’t Get High”:

From vlogger Johan Cederblad:

The Fugs: I Couldn’t Get High

‘Weird Al’ Yankovic: First World Problems


Lo and behold, Weird Al is back, and bigger than ever, with his newest album, Mandatory Fun, topping Billboard’s charts on its debut, an all-time first for the parodist and, indeed, the first parody chart-topper ever.

We’re particularly fond of one offering.

From his vlog, alyankovicVEVO:

“Weird Al” Yankovic – First World Problems

Kinda puts things in perspective, what with Ebola, the Ukraine, and all that.