Category Archives: Hypocrisy

From BBC 2: ‘Super Rich: The Greed Game’


Broadcast, fittingly, on 1 April 2008 just as the bubble was bursting, this BBC 2 documentary, produced and directed by John O’Kane and narrated by Robert Peston, is a reminder that the modern “wealth creator” is rarely the inventor of some new product that makes our lives better but is rather an expert at manipulating the money game, in which creation of notional riches becomes the end rather than a mere byproduct of their efforts.

And at the center of the debacle were the central banksters, acting to ensure that confidence in currency, the prerequisite for green game players, was bolstered, despite all the screeching alarm bells.

And note that facilitating it all were the so-called “liberal” political parties, with Britain’s Labour Party and the Democrats in the U.S. greased the skids in the 1990s by deregulating financial markets and paving the way to an explosion of hedge fund wealth.

What is particularly galling is the rampant and unalloyed arrogance of the players to whom the rest of us, as one of them offhandedly remarks, are mere riffraff.

From BBC 2 via Underground Documentaries:

Super Rich: The Greed Game

Program note:

As the credit crunch bites and a global economic crisis threatens, Robert Peston reveals how the super-rich have made their fortunes, and the rest of us are picking up the bill.

New developments in the war on the press


Plus other casualties, one liely self-inflicted, a thousand more the consequence of harsh new economic “realities.”

First up, via The Real News Network, a report on the epidemic of arrests of journalists covering the unfolding drama in Ferguson, Missouri:

Police Continue to Violate Press Freedom In Ferguson

Program note:

With 11 journalists arrested thus far, Truthout.org investigative reporter Mike Ludwig describes how Ferguson police are using intimidation tactics against journalists

Next, from the Associated Press, a reporter withholding a confidential source is treated better in Afghanistan than in the U.S.:

Afghanistan orders NYT reporter to leave country

Afghanistan ordered a New York Times journalist Wednesday to leave the country in 24 hours and barred him from returning over a story he wrote saying that a group of officials were considering seizing power because of the impasse over who won its recent presidential election, the attorney general’s office said in a statement.

The attorney general’s office called Matthew Rosenberg, 40, into their office Tuesday and asked him to reveal his sources, which he refused to do, the Times reported. On Wednesday, the attorney general’s office said the story threatened Afghanistan’s stability and security, announcing that he was being expelled. The statement suggested that the reporting, which relied largely on unnamed sources, was fabricated.

The Afghan Foreign Affairs Ministry and security agencies had been notified of the expulsion, the statement said.

From Deutsche Welle, finding a message in killing the messenger:

Islam expert on IS: ‘The main message is revenge’

A video depicting the beheading of a US journalist is part of a highly professional media strategy by the “Islamic State,” Islam expert Christoph Günther tells DW.

DW: The “Islamic State” (IS), previously known as ISIS, has published a video which purportedly depicts the beheading of US journalist James Foley. What was the message of this video?

Christoph Günther: The main message is revenge. The aesthetic presentation speaks a clear language. By dressing the victim in an orange jumpsuit like the detainees in Guantanamo, they’re saying, “We are turning the tables on you.”

The second message is one of deterrence: “If you use military force against us, then we will hit back with all means available to us. If need be, we will target all of your citizens that we can get our hands on: Journalists, employees of Western companies in the Kurdish region, and people who work for aid organizations.”

More from the Associated Press:

Militants use British killer as propaganda

Islamic militants are using a beheading video to send a chilling message — not just through the gruesome act, but also by the choice of messenger.

The black-clad fighter who appears to kill journalist James Foley speaks with an English accent, underscoring the insurgents’ increasing use of Western militants to mobilize recruits, terrify opponents and project the image of a global force.

He is the latest in a string of international jihadis — Britons, Australians, Chechens, Chinese and Indonesians — to appear in propaganda for the Islamic State group.

“They like to suggest they have a presence around the world much stronger than it is,” said Charlie Cooper, a researcher at the Quilliam Foundation, a British counter-extremism think tank. “It does suggest that people all over the world are going off to fight in the tens of thousands.”

From the International Business Times, a mission that failed:

US Special Forces Operation Attempted Rescue Of American Journalist James Foley Before Beheading

Dozens of U.S. Special Forces conducted an operation with both air and ground components earlier this summer to rescue American citizens being held by Islamic State (ISIS) militants in Syria, the White House said Thursday. The news came just a day after the militant group published a video showing the gruesome beheading of U.S. journalist James Foley.

The dangerous rescue mission focused on a “particular captor network” within the Sunni militant group formerly known as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. Several ISIS members were killed and one U.S. soldier was wounded, according to CNN. The operation failed when no Americans were found.

“The United States attempted a rescue operation recently to free a number of American hostages held in Syria by ISIL,” the Pentagon said on Wednesday. “This operation involved air and ground components and was focused on a particular captor network within ISIL. Unfortunately, the mission was not successful because the hostages were not present at the targeted location.”

Vanity Fair hints at more potential tragedies to come:

James Foley’s Execution Raises Fears for Journalists Whose Kidnappings Remain Secret

Foley was not alone. I’d known for some time that he, along with a number of other Westerners, remained in the custody of ISIS. Many people who knew Jim, including his family and his employer, GlobalPost, had been making patient and valiant attempts to secure his release. In the video, the executioner shows off another kidnapped American journalist, Steven Sotloff, a freelancer who has contributed to Time magazine and was seized by ISIS in northern Syria in the summer of 2013, and threatens to kill him too. Foley’s family went public early with the news of his abduction, but most people don’t know about many of the other kidnappings. In large part this is because governments and families have persuaded themselves that the best strategy is to institute a “media blackout” in the hope of quietly securing the release of loved ones. Such blackouts don’t necessarily end with the release of hostages. The few who have been released from the custody of ISIS (about a half dozen, none of them American) appear to have been let go for money or other benefits—and to have been sworn to secrecy. There are arguments for and against such blackouts, and there have been lively debates among the families of the missing about their strategic value, but in principle they seem inimical to the spirit of journalism—and potentially counterproductive.

As a crime, kidnapping is uniquely cruel. Amid all the international concern about chemical weapons, thousands of ordinary Syrians have quietly been kidnapped in the last three years; there are no security companies to look out for them, and there is little outcry when they don’t come back. For a long period of time, Foley’s family, like many other families, had no idea whether their son was alive or dead. According to someone close to one of the cases, other prisoners who spent time with Foley noted that he had been severely tortured. He was also well liked: despite his travails over nearly two years of captivity, he remained upbeat and optimistic until the end. His killing will likely ignite a furious debate about the merits of President Obama’s decision to intervene in Iraq, and whether the administration could have done more to protect kidnapped Americans in Syria.

The Associated Press covers another journalistic fatality:

Press groups urge probe of Honduras reporter slay

Press freedom groups are urging Honduran authorities to thoroughly investigate the slaying of a broadcast journalist who was shot to death outside his home last week.

The Committee to Protect Journalists on Tuesday condemned Nery Soto Torres’ killing and urged authorities to launch a full investigation and punish those responsible.

Police say two gunmen waiting in motorcycles shot Soto Torres to death Thursday as he arrived home in the city of Olanchito, in northern Yoro state.

The 32-year-old journalist directed and hosted a news program on Olanchito’s Channel 23. At least 46 journalists, broadcasters and media executives have been killed in Honduras since 2003.

From Reuters, the journalism body count graphically depicted:

Journalists in danger worldwide

From the London Telegraph, another kind of information control:

Viewing or sharing beheading video could be a criminal offence, police warn

  • As YouTube and Twitter suspend the accounts of people who share the graphic beheading video, Scotland Yard ones sharing it online could be a crime

Viewing or sharing the harrowing video of James Foley’s beheading online could be regarded as a terrorist offence, Scotland Yard has warned.

A spokesman for the Metropolitan Police said specialists from the Counter Terrorism unit were continuing to examine the footage in order to look for clues as to the identity of the suspected British jihadist but said the public should refrain from viewing the video.

In a statement a spokesman said: “We would like to remind the public that viewing, downloading or disseminating extremist material within the UK may constitute an offence under Terrorism legislation.”

While India Today covers another journalistic wound, possibly self-inflicted:

Fareed Zakaria faces fresh plagiarism charges

Indian-American journalist Fareed Zakaria, who two years ago got away from a plagiarism controversy claiming he made a “terrible mistake”, is facing fresh plagiarism charges from anonymous internet watchdogs.

The website “Our Bad Media” in a Tuesday report by @blippoblappo and @crushingbort cited 12 instances where Zakaria appears to have lifted passages wholesale from other authors.

“Their findings cast doubt on the three news outlets — Time Magazine, CNN and The Washington Post — which claimed to have conducted reviews of Zakaria’s work and found the so-called ‘mistake’ to be an isolated incident,” said Politico, an influential news site.

And Columbia Journalism Review spots hypocrisy bordering on the surreal:

Why Obama’s statement on reporters’ arrests in Ferguson is hypocritical

Obama defends reporters in Ferguson, but demands compliance from James Risen

In a news conference Thursday addressing the killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown and resulting unrest in Ferguson, MO, President Barack Obama criticized the arrests of two reporters there on Wednesday night.

“Here in the United States of America, police should not be bullying or arresting journalists who are just trying to do their jobs,” Obama said in a news conference televised from Martha’s Vineyard, where he’s vacationing. On Wednesday, Washington Post reporter Wesley Lowery and Huffington Post reporter Ryan Reilly were arrested when working out of a McDonald’s in Ferguson. After being taken to the Ferguson Police Department, both were quickly released.

Just minutes after the president finished his remarks, a coalition of journalism organizations at the National Press Club in Washington began a news conference condemning the Obama administration’s attempt to compel James Risen, a New York Times reporter, to identify a confidential source. The menagerie of groups this morning presented a petition, signed by more than 125,000 people, calling on the Justice Department to end its six-year effort to force Risen to testify against his source.

In June, the US Supreme Court turned down a last-ditch appeal from Risen, removing the final legal barrier for federal prosecutors who want him to take the stand.

And from Common Dreams, another war on the press, this time in the interests of another nation:

The Double Identity of an “Anti-Semitic” Commenter

  • Smearing a Progressive Website to Support Israel

Like many other news websites, Common Dreams has been plagued by inflammatory anti-Semitic comments following its stories. But on Common Dreams these posts have been so frequent and intense they have driven away donors from a nonprofit dependent on reader generosity.

A Common Dreams investigation has discovered that more than a thousand of these damaging comments over the past two years were written with a deceptive purpose by a Jewish Harvard graduate in his thirties who was irritated by the website’s discussion of issues involving Israel.

His intricate campaign, which he has admitted to Common Dreams, included posting comments by a screen name, “JewishProgressive,” whose purpose was to draw attention to and denounce the anti-Semitic comments that he had written under many other screen names.

Finally, from the Guardian, another body count:

News Corp Australia leaked accounts show 1,000 jobs cut across mastheads

  • Major leak of confidential operating accounts reveal extent of losses with the Australian losing about $30m a year

The financial health of News Corp Australia’s newspapers has been laid bare by a leak of its confidential operating accounts, which reveal the extent of the Australian losses and that the company has quietly shed more than 1,000 staff.

Earlier this month it was revealed that News Corporation’s full-year profit was more than halved as revenue from its Australian newspapers continued to slide.

But the leak gives far more detail about the picture across the mastheads.

Gullible’s Travels: John Oliver dissects a U.S. myth


What is it that most distinguishes Britons from Americans?

It’s what one might call [A]merito-utopianism, the dysfunctional adherence of the mass of the American people to believe that material well-being — defined by the media as extravagant and lavishly photographic consumption of corporate-produced goods, ranging from telephoto shots of yachting celebrity down to the suburban tenth-grader’s Tweeted and YouTubed selfies.

Wealth, the media imply or declare overtly [Fox being merely the most blatant], results from talent or some other form of merit, a legacy in part of Calvinism, thought vastly reinforced by corporate media shaped by the sales needs of other corporations who often spend more on producing a thirty-second commercial than entertainment companies spend producing sixty-minute programs.

And then there’s that American that we’re really a classless society, a view unsustainable in a history-burdened Britain, as John Oliver explains in this segment from his HBO series.

What makes his debunking delightful is the final section, an upending of tropes so vividly illustrated.

Enjoy. . .

From Last Week Tonight with John Oliver:

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Wealth Gap (HBO)

Program note:

John Oliver discusses America’s growing wealth gap and why it may be a problem in the future.

And yes, it’s froim last month, but we only chanced upon it only yesterday.

From wiseguys to banksters, nasty payday loans


Wiseguys call it “the vig,” those extortionate rates guys with names like Vinny or Frankie Fists used to collect on loans you got from your friendly neighborhood loan shark.

But wiseguys have fallen on hard times because Uncle Sam has legitimated those muscular interest rates. And now you get ‘em from your friendly neighborhood corporate bankster.

Indeed, the guys who used to hand out in candy stores and dimly lit pool halls have been replaced by grinning hucksters who operate out of brightly lit storefronts that now outnumber Starbucks and Mickey Ds.

But fear not, John Oliver and Sarah Silverman are on the cash.

From HBO’s Last Week Tonight with John Oliver:

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Predatory Lending

Program notes:

Payday loans put a staggering amount of Americans in debt. They prey on the elderly and military service members. They’re awful, and nearly impossible to regulate. We’ve recruited Sarah Silverman to help spread the word about how to avoid falling into their clutches.

What a world! There’s now no separation between underworld and upperworld.

The new America: College campus soup kitchens


From RT [yes, we know that stands from Russia Today], a telling example of the consequences of rigging the game.

Food for Thought: US students struggle with hunger as tuition skyrockets

Program notes:

Skyrocketing tuition fees in America are now forcing many students to struggle to find any food for thought. So some universities are now setting up soup kitchens, to make sure their pupils can make it through the day.

InSecurityWatch: Bombs, hacks, drones, more


We’ve got a major collection today, including some items revealing how vulnerable our phones, cars, planes, and more are increasingly vulnerable to government, corporate, and other hackers, the latest developments in Asia’s Game of Zones, and a whole lot more. . .

We open with the newest phase of America’s endless wars — call it Iraq.3.0 — via the New York Times:

U.S. Warplanes Strike Militants in Iraq

The United States on Friday afternoon launched a second round of airstrikes on Sunni militants in northern Iraq, sending four Navy fighter jets to strike eight targets around Erbil, according to Pentagon officials.

The attacks came hours after an initial wave of strikes by military aircraft and armed drones, escalating the American involvement in Iraq a day after President Obama announced that the United States military was returning to a direct combat role in the country it left in 2011.

Military officials said they believed that the second round of attacks resulted in a number of casualties among the militants with the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria. The Navy fighters launched from the aircraft carrier George H. W. Bush, which has been deployed in the Arabian Sea.

Earlier Friday, two F-18 fighters dropped 500-pound laser-guided bombs on a mobile artillery target that had just begun shelling Erbil, Pentagon officials said. A senior military official said on Friday that the artillery unit hit in the earlier bombing was being towed by a truck toward Erbil.

The Associated Press has some context:

Iraq official: Militants hold 100s of Yazidi women

Hundreds of women from the Yazidi religious minority have been taken captive by Sunni militants with “vicious plans,” an Iraqi official said Friday, further underscoring the dire plight of Iraq’s minorities at the hands of the Islamic State group.

Kamil Amin, the spokesman for Iraq’s Human Rights Ministry, said hundreds of Yazidi women below the age of 35 are being held in schools in Iraq’s second largest city, Mosul. He said the ministry learned of the captives from their families.

“We think that the terrorists by now consider them slaves and they have vicious plans for them,” Amin told The Associated Press. “We think that these women are going to be used in demeaning ways by those terrorists to satisfy their animalistic urges in a way that contradicts all the human and Islamic values.”

While the London Daily Mail rattles sabers:

TWO retired four-star generals blast Obama for failing to use ‘decisive’ force in Iraq with ‘pinprick’ attacks for ‘political posturing’

  • Retired Gen. Barry McCaffrey laid into Obama on Friday, saying bombing runs against ISIS positions are political posturing
  • ‘These are political gestures using military power,’ he said, lamenting the president’s lack of commitment to a full-blown military campaign
  • Obama ran for president on a platform of getting US military out of Iraq but began bombing runs Friday morning in the country’s northern region
  • White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest assured reporters on Friday that a ground-troop incursion is out of the question
  • GOP critics are hammering the White House for not being more aggressive
  • House Speaker John Boehner said the White House has an ‘ongoing absence of a strategy for countering the grave threat ISIS poses’
  • Obama underestimated ISIS in January, telling The New Yorker that ‘If a jayvee team puts on Lakers uniforms that doesn’t make them Kobe Bryant’

CNBC raises an ironic question:

Will US airstrikes target US-supplied weapons?

As American pilots fly new airstrikes over northern Iraq Friday, they’ll see some very familiar weaponry in the hands of Islamic State forces: Humvees, MRAP transports, American-made heavy machine guns and American artillery.

Islamic State (which also goes by ISIS or ISIL) forces captured the haul of American weapons as the U.S.-supplied Iraqi Army retreated in the face of the extremist onslaught, leaving expensive American equipment littered on the battlefield.

All that raises the prospect that, at some point during these airstrikes, American taxpayer-financed fighter jets will fire on and destroy American taxpayer-financed weapons on the ground.

And the McClatchy Washington Bureau adds a dash of bitters:

Why can’t Islamic State be stopped? Analysts say it’s better armed, better organized

Observers on the ground and analysts in Washington believe that the latest push was possible because the peshmerga forces are stretched trying to defend a frontier with the Islamic State that is nearly 900 miles long. The Islamic State is also better equipped, with U.S.-supplied weapons that its forces have looted from every Iraqi military based it has seized. It also has recently captured major Syrian arsenals.

On Twitter, the Islamic State often posts photos of its bounty from military bases, which include rocket-propelled-grenade launchers, artillery and weapons that are far more sophisticated than those in the peshmerga arsenal.

The Islamic State also has the advantage of momentum. According to the Long Wars Journal, citing a tweet by the Islamic State, its forces have taken control of 17 communities in the area around Mosul. Its push stretches all the way to Diyala province in northeast Iraq, which borders Iran. On Thursday, the Islamic State claimed to control the Mosul Dam, the largest water supply source in Iraq _ a claim U.S. and Iraqi sources confirmed.

And perhaps most importantly, the Islamic State has very simply put together a smarter offensive plan. Its push toward Irbil is believed by many not to be a move to take that city but to force the peshmerga to defend its capital, allowing the Islamic State to harden its grip on places nearby it’s more interesting in holding.

And for our final item on the subject, no comment needed, via The Verge:

The Pentagon used a tweet to tell the world about airstrikes in Iraq

  • Tweets are the new briefings

From United Press International, gettin’ real [somewhat late]:

New York Times will now use the word ‘torture’

President Barack Obama made waves last Friday when he admitted the United States tortured terror suspects in order to get information.

The New York Times will now use the word “torture” in stories regarding interrogations in which the paper is sure pain was inflicted to get information.

The Times has faced criticism for its hesitation to use the word when speaking about the controversial interrogation techniques used by the United States and specifically the Central Intelligence Agency when trying to get information from terror suspects. They had previously used Bush administration-coined euphemisms such as “enhanced interrogation techniques.”

In an editorial published Thursday, executive editor Dean Baquet said The Times will no longer use these euphemisms and instead call it what it is.

From Aviation Week, Skynet fears continue unabated [thank heavens]:

‘Certifiable Trust’ Required To Take Autonomous Systems Past ‘Unmanned’

  • Deployment of autonomous capabilities across aerospace faces major hurdle

Aviation has been built around humans since before the origins of powered flight, but unmanned technology is opening new design spaces in unexpected ways. Now shaped by the strengths and weaknesses of pilots and controllers, how aircraft are flown and air traffic managed could change dramatically in coming decades as autonomy becomes understood, accepted and, eventually, trusted.

“Aviation has been very successful with a -humancentric paradigm, the idea that it is humans that save the day,” says Danette Allen, chief technologist for autonomy at NASA Langley Research Center. Even with the Northrop Grumman RQ-4 Global Hawk—arguably the most automated of today’s unmanned aircraft—“the human is still on or in the loop for situational awareness, just in case they have to jump in and solve problems,” she says.

But autonomy means machines making decisions, not humans, and behaving in ways that are not painstakingly pre-planned and pre-programmed. It requires safe and trusted systems than can perceive their environment for situational awareness and assessment, make decisions on uncertain and inaccurate information, act appropriately, learn from experience and adapt their behavior. “In Washington, autonomy has become the ‘A’ word. It has become a negative,” says Rose Mooney, executive of the Mid-Atlantic Aviation Partnership, one of six civil-UAS test sites established by the FAA.

“Certifiable trust”? Does that mean you have to be certifiable to trust ‘em?

For our next drone story, we turn to the Associated Press:

Central NY airport new site for drone safety tests

Federal regulators have approved drone research flights at a central New York airport, one of six sites nationally chosen to assess the safety of the aerial robots in already busy skies.

The other mission at Griffiss International Airport in Rome will be to study how drones can help farmers stay on top of pests, weeds and the conditions of their crops.

The NUAIR Alliance, a consortium of private industry, academic institutions and the military, says flights could begin in a couple of weeks after the Federal Aviation Administration approval Thursday. Future operations will include Massachusetts. The other test sites are in Alaska, North Dakota, Nevada, Texas and Virginia.

And for our final dronal delight, there’s this from Ars Technica:

San Jose Police Department says FAA can’t regulate its drone use

  • FAA disagrees, says law enforcement definitely needs permission to use a drone.

Newly published documents show that the San Jose Police Department (SJPD), which publicly acknowledged Tuesday that it should have “done a better job of communicating” its drone acquisition, does not believe that it even needs federal authorization in order to fly a drone. The Federal Aviation Administration thinks otherwise.

Late last month, a set of documents showed that the SJPD acquired a Hexacopter called the Century Neo 660, along with a GoPro video camera and live video transmitter. The nearly $7,000 January 2014 purchase was funded through a grant from the Bay Area Urban Areas Security Initiative, a regional arm of the Department of Homeland Security. San Jose, which proclaims itself the “capital of Silicon Valley,” is the third-largest city in California and the tenth-largest in the United States.

The documents, which were sent to MuckRock as part of a public records request and were published on Wednesday for the first time, make a number of statements suggesting that the SJPD has a deep misunderstanding of current drone policy.

Next up, more dirty dealing at Scotland Yard from the Independent:

Secret internal police report points to ‘highly corrupt’ cells in the Met

Three former Scotland Yard detectives were part of “highly corrupt cells within the Metropolitan Police Service” but have never been brought to justice, according to a secret internal report seen by The Independent.

The police officers, who left the Met to open a private investigation agency, were suspected of seizing tens of thousands of ecstasy tablets from criminals and selling the drugs themselves, according to a file produced by the force’s anti-corruption command.

The 2000 report said the officers also had links to London’s criminal underworld and were capable of tracking down and threatening witnesses involved in sensitive trials.

On to the world of hackery, starting with the latest biggie, first from ProPublica:

Leaked Docs Show Spyware Used to Snoop on U.S. Computers

  • Software created by the controversial U.K. based Gamma Group International was used to spy on computers that appear to be located in the United States.

Software created by the controversial U.K. based Gamma Group International was used to spy on computers that appear to be located in the United States, the U.K., Germany, Russia, Iran and Bahrain, according to a leaked trove of documents analyzed by ProPublica.

It’s not clear whether the surveillance was conducted by governments or private entities. Customer email addresses in the collection appeared to belong to a German surveillance company, an independent consultant in Dubai, the Bosnian and Hungarian Intelligence services, a Dutch law enforcement officer and the Qatari government.

The leaked files — which were posted online by hackers — are the latest in a series of revelations about how state actors including repressive regimes have used Gamma’s software to spy on dissidents, journalists and activist groups.

And The Intercept covers one country amongst the targets:

Leaked Files: German Spy Company Helped Bahrain Hack Arab Spring Protesters

A notorious surveillance technology company that helps governments around the world spy on their citizens sold software to Bahrain during that country’s brutal response to the Arab Spring movement, according to leaked internal documents posted this week on the internet.

The documents show that FinFisher, a German surveillance company, helped Bahrain install spyware on 77 computers, including those belonging to human rights lawyers and a now-jailed opposition leader, between 2010 and 2012—a period that includes Bahrain’s crackdown on pro-democracy protesters. FinFisher’s software gives remote spies total access to compromised computers. Some of the computers that were spied on appear to have been located in the United States and United Kingdom, according to a report from Bahrain Watch.

Earlier this week, an anonymous hacker released 40 gigabytes of what appears to be internal data from FinFisher on Twitter and Reddit, including messages between people who appear to be Bahraini government officials and FinFisher customer service representatives.

In those messages, Bahraini software administrators complained to FinFisher that they were “losing targets daily” due to faults in its software. In one message employing the language of a frustrated consumer, a spy appeared to complain that he or she had to keep re-infecting a targeted computer, risking detection: “[W]e cant stay bugging and infecting the target every time since it is very sensitive. and we don’t want the target to reach to know that someone is infecting his PC or spying on him” one message reads.

For our next hackery item, RT America covers a major conference and some revelations aired during sessions:

Black Hat hackers conference exposing flaws in everyday electronics

Program notes:

The “Internet of Things” is a hot topic at this year’s Black Hat cybesrsecurity conference in Las Vegas. With more household, security and even medical devices being connected to the internet, the threats posed by hackers and nefarious governments are growing. Web connected insulin pumps, home thermostats and other technologies are easily hacked and have had numerous security flaws exposed, potentially putting lives at risk, warn experts. Erin Ade, host of RT’s Boom Bust, is at the conference and has more.

Al Jazeera America has another overview:

Hackers sound alarm about Internet of Things

  • By reframing cybersecurity as a public safety issue, white-hat hackers may be making inroads in Washington

A hacker with a smartphone can unlock your front door. Your refrigerator becomes infected with a virus that launches cyber attacks against activists in Bahrain. Criminals and intelligence agencies grab data from your home thermostat to plan robberies or track your movements.

According to computer-security researchers, this is the troubling future of the Internet of Things, the term for an all-connected world where appliances like thermostats, health-tracking wristbands, smart cars and medical devices communicate with people and each other through the Internet. Many of these products are already on the market, and over the next decade, they are expected to become dramatically more commonplace.

For consumers, the Internet of Things will allow high-tech convenience that not long ago seemed like science fiction — a car’s GPS automatically turning on the air conditioner in your house as you drive home from work, for example. But security experts see a dystopian nightmare that is quickly becoming reality. A study released last week by Hewlett Packard concluded that 70 percent of Internet of Things devices contain serious vulnerabilities. Experts say it’s the latest evidence that our dependence on Internet-connected technology is outpacing our ability to secure it.

Defense One covers one session’s fruits:

Hacker Shows How to Break Into Military Communications

Soldiers on the front lines use satellite communications systems, called SATCOMS to call in back up, lead their comrades away from hot spots and coordinate attacks, among other things. Airplanes use SATCOMS to rely on data between the ground and the plane, and ships use them to avoid collisions at sea and call for help during storms or attacks. A well-known hacker says he’s found some major flaws in the communication equipment that ground troops use to coordinate movements. The equipment is also common on a variety of commercial ships and aircraft rely on to give pilots vital information. In other words, you can hack planes.

Speaking at the Black Hat cyber security conference, analyst Ruben Santamarta of IOActive presented a much-anticipated paper showing that communications devices from Harris, Hughes, Cobham, Thuraya, JRC, and Iridium are all highly vulnerable to attack. The security flaws are numerous but the most important one — the one that’s the most consistent across the systems— is back doors, special points that engineers design into the systems to allow fast access. Another common security flaw is hardcoded credentials, which allows multiple users access to a system via a single login identity.

Santamarta claims that a satellite communication system that’s common in military aviation, the Cobham Aviator 700D, could be hacked in a way that could affect devices that interact with critical systems possibly resulting in “catastrophic failure.”

MIT Technology Review covers another:

Black Hat: Google Glass Can Steal Your Passcodes

  • Footage of people unlocking their phones can be used to steal mobile passcodes even if the typing can’t be seen.

Criticism of Google Glass has often focused on the way its camera makes surreptitious video recording too easy. Now researchers have shown that footage captured by the face-mounted camera could also pose a security threat.

Software developed by the researchers can automatically recover the passcodes of people recorded on video as they type in their credentials, even when the screen itself is not visible to the camera. The attack works by watching the movement of the fingers to work out what keys they are touching. It also works on footage from camcorders, webcams, and smartphones, but Glass offers perhaps the subtlest way to stage it.

The work suggests that “shoulder surfing”—stealing passwords or other data by watching someone at a computer—could become more of a threat as digital cameras and powerful image processing software become more common.

Ars Technica covers a third:

Security expert calls home routers a clear and present danger

  • In Black Hat Q&A, In-Q-Tel CISO says home routers are “critical infrastructure.”

During his keynote and a press conference that followed here at the Black Hat information security conference, In-Q-Tel Chief Information Security Officer Dan Geer expressed concern about the growing threat of botnets powered by home and small office routers. The inexpensive Wi-Fi routers commonly used for home Internet access—which are rarely patched by their owners—are an easy target for hackers, Geer said, and could be used to construct a botnet that “could probably take down the Internet.” Asked by Ars if he considered home routers to be the equivalent of critical infrastructure as a security priority, he answered in the affirmative.

Geer spoke about the threat posed by home routers in advance of “SOHOpelessly Broken,” a router hacking contest scheduled for the DEF CON security conference later this week sponsored by the Electronic Frontier Foundation. “Because they are so cheap, you can get a low-end router for less than 20 bucks that hasn’t been updated in a while,” Geer explained.

Attackers could identify vulnerabilities in particular models and then scan the Internet for targets based on the routers’ signatures. “They can then build botnets on the exterior of the network—the routing that it does is only on side facing ISPs,” he said. “If I can build a botnet on the outside of the routers, I could probably take down the Internet.”

MIT Technology Review covers a fourth:

Black Hat: Car Security Is Likely to Worsen, Researchers Say

  • In-car applications and wireless connectivity are a boon to hackers who take aim at cars.

The electronic systems in cars increasingly control safety-critical functionality.

As more cars come with wireless connectivity and in-car apps, more of them will be vulnerable to potentially dangerous hacking, two well-known researchers warned at the Black Hat security conference in Las Vegas on Wednesday.

In a study of nearly 20 different vehicles, Charlie Miller, a security engineer with Twitter, and Chris Valasek, director of vehicle security research with security services firm ioActive, concluded that most control systems were not designed with security in mind and could be compromised remotely. The pair created cybersecurity ratings for the vehicles, which will be published in a paper later this week.

And from Wired threat level, that darned cat:

How to Use Your Cat to Hack Your Neighbor’s Wi-Fi

Late last month, a Siamese cat named Coco went wandering in his suburban Washington, DC neighborhood. He spent three hours exploring nearby backyards. He killed a mouse, whose carcass he thoughtfully brought home to his octogenarian owner, Nancy. And while he was out, Coco mapped dozens of his neighbors’ Wi-Fi networks, identifying four routers that used an old, easily-broken form of encryption and another four that were left entirely unprotected.

Unbeknownst to Coco, he’d been fitted with a collar created by Nancy’s granddaughter’s husband, security researcher Gene Bransfield. And Bransfield had built into that collar a Spark Core chip loaded with his custom-coded firmware, a Wi-Fi card, a tiny GPS module and a battery—everything necessary to map all the networks in the neighborhood that would be vulnerable to any intruder or Wi-Fi mooch with, at most, some simple crypto-cracking tools.

Reuters covers another blow to online anonymity:

Russia demands Internet users show ID to access public Wifi

Russia further tightened its control of the Internet on Friday, requiring people using public Wifi hotspots provide identification, a policy that prompted anger from bloggers and confusion among telecom operators on how it would work.

The decree, signed by Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev on July 31 but published online on Friday, also requires companies to declare who is using their web networks. The legislation caught many in the industry by surprise and companies said it was not clear how it would be enforced.

A flurry of new laws regulating Russia’s once freewheeling Internet has been condemned by President Vladimir Putin’s critics as a crackdown on dissent, after the websites of two of his prominent foes were blocked this year.

The Guardian covers the Down Under version of a familiar story:

Warrantless metadata access is already taking place at higher rate than ever

  • A multitude of agencies currently have access to metadata and in 2012-13 used those powers on 330,640 occasions

Given the current debate about metadata retention in Australia it’s worth pointing out that various organisations can access your metadata already, without a warrant – and it’s occurring at a higher rate than ever before.

In mid 2013 we wrote about how agencies from the police to the RSPCA to the Victorian Taxi Directorate are able to access “existing information or documents” from telecommunications companies without a warrant. The information can include details of phone calls (but not the contents of the call) and internet access details such as subscribers’ personal information, and dates and times of internet usage.

The most recent figures, released in December 2013, show warrantless access to metadata occurred on 330,640 occasions in the 2012-13 financial year. The agency requesting the data is required to fill out a request form, however there is no judicial oversight or requirement that law enforcers prove suspicion of a crime being committed.

And from the McClatchy Washington Bureau, idiotic obstructionism:

Judge dings FBI for response to inmate’s FOIA requests

A federal judge has slapped the FBI, or maybe just laughed at it, for making “transparently implausible” arguments while resisting a prison inmate’s Freedom of Information Act requests.

The feds, U.S. District Judge James E. Boasberg wrote, in what sounds like a state of near-incredulity, argued that the “FOIA request need not be disclosed because they reside on two CDs and a thumb drive.”

That’s right. The FBI seemed to say that information was exempt from disclosure because of the medium it was stored on.

After the jump, the latest developments in the Game of Zones, including spooky arrests, an Orwellian anecdote, an X-rated protest, and a whole lot more. . . Continue reading

Bellicose bullshit: Phony pretexts for war


From Breaking the Set, Abby Martin looks at the bizarre pretexts used for launching wars, with her focus on the 50th anniversary of the Gulf of Tonkin incident, the pretext seized by the Lundon Johnson administration to dramatically escalate America’s role in the war that would end with the nation’s first major military defeat.

It’s a timely reminder that citizens should turn a very skeptical ear to the explanations offered by politicians for slaughtering other people, something folks have a hard time remembering when the rhetoric amps up.

From Breaking the Set:

Top 5 Most Absurd Pretexts for War in Modern History | Brainwash Update

Program notes:

Abby Martin remarks on the 50th Anniversary of the Gulf of Tonkin incident, going a few of the most absurd pretexted for war in modern history.

How to violate the Constituion with impunity


And, apparently, prosecutorial immunity from the administration of Hope™ and Change™.

From The Real News Network, a look at the CIA’s spying on Senate staffers and the rationalizations given by the Obama administration for not prosecuting what amounts to a near-treasonous violation of the separation of powers doctrine.

The discussion features TRNN’s Jessica Desverieaux with Elizabeth Goitein, codirector of NYU Law School’s Brennan Center for Justice Liberty and National Security Program, and Jonathan Landay, senior national security and intelligence reporter for McClatchy newspapers.

From The Real News Network:

CIA Admits to Spying on Senate but No Prosecutions to Follow 

From the transcript:

DESVARIEUX: So, Jonathan, let’s start off with you. Remind our viewers why Senator Feinstein came out denouncing the CIA’s spying on her staff, because she’s more or less been rubberstamping everything that the intelligence community has been doing. So why did she decide to go after them?

LANDAY: Well, this apparently was a major red line for her, having to do with the Constitution, the constitutional separation of powers between the executive and its congressional overseers, as well as, she said in March, a potential violation of the law, one of those laws probably being the Computer Fraud Act. What she was angry about was initially denied by CIA Director Brennan, and that was that contrary to an agreement that had been brought, an agreement between her committee and the CIA, there was a protected database on this system that the CIA required the committee staff to use in compiling its report in a top-secret CIA facility somewhere in Northern Virginia. The allegation that Senator Feinstein made in March was that the CIA had in fact penetrated this database and had the monitored the documents that her staff was putting into that database, and in fact had on several occasions not just blocked access to documents that had already been put in that database, but also removed documents that had been put in that database. An investigation was launched by the CIA inspector general based on these allegations, and what we came to know last week was that the inspector general had in fact, apparently, confirmed what Senator Feinstein had alleged, that CIA personnel, contrary to the agreement that they had with–the CIA had with committee, had in fact penetrated this database.

DESVARIEUX: This sounds like a huge deal, to say the least. Elizabeth, the last time you were on the program, you mentioned that if Senator Feinstein’s accusations were actually right, that this is “a crisis of constitutional proportions”. Give us a sense of where this stands. Will we see some criminal wrongdoing by the CIA? Will we actually see them being prosecuted?

ELIZABETH GOITEIN, CODIR., BRENNAN CENTER LIBERTY AND NATIONAL SECURITY PROGRAM: Well, you’ve asked two different questions, whether there’s criminal wrongdoing and whether there’ll be prosecutions. I think what I said before. I stand by it. I think this is a crisis of constitutional proportions. These actions by the CIA do violate the separation of powers, which is sort of the foundation of checks and balances in our Constitution. It’s possible they also violate the Fourth Amendment. It’s possible they violate the Speech or Debate Clause. It’s also possible that they violate the Computer Fraud Act. So we are talking about a number of fairly serious potential legal violations. However, the Justice Department has already looked into allegations of wrongdoing by the CIA and has declined prosecution, and presumably the Justice Department had access to the same information that the inspector general had access to. So I think this is going to play itself out in politics and not in the courtroom would be my prediction.

Eric J. Garcia: Pro-Life?!


From his blog, El Machete Illustrated:

BLOG Machete

John Oliver strikes again, eviscerates media


“Native advertising” is the latest and most pathetic of gimmicks employed in a last-ditch effort to save the news media, whether in print, online, or on the air.

In the latest edition of HBO’s Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, the British-born comedian offers the best take we’ve seen of the plague that is destroying whatever shred of MSM credibility still remains.

What’s particularly striking are the clips featuring convoluted justifications employed by media execs for their lethal assault on what journalists once called the Chinese Wall separating newsroom and advertising. Particularly unctuous is the rationale offered by a New York Times executive, who calls the cooked copy the result of editorial sharing their story-telling skills with advertising, a vomitous semantic reach that simply violates every precept of the journalist’s craft.

Back in 1966, when we took our first daily newspaper job at the Las Vegas Review-Journal, we recall several occasions when advertising staff would slither through the swinging door into to approach editor Jim Leavey with some item they hope to place in the news pages.

Leavey, a normally placid Irish-American, would turn bright red, grab the offender huckster by the arm and bodily shove him out of editorial, screaming “YOU GOD DAM WHORES STAY OUT OF MY NEWSROOM!”

In today’s newsroom, yesteryear’s offender would meet with a warm embrace.

From Last Week Tonight with John Oliver:

Native Advertising

Program note:

The line between editorial content and advertising in news media is blurrier and blurrier. That’s not bullshit. It’s repurposed bovine waste.

InSecurityWatch: Liars, spyers, bluffs, triers


Today’s collection of tales from the dark side begins with actions that in some other countries might be considered treasonous.

From the Guardian:

CIA admits to spying on Senate staffers

  • CIA director apologises for improper conduct of agency staff
  • One senator calls on John Brennan to resign in wake of scandal

The director of the Central Intelligence Agency, John Brennan, issued an extraordinary apology to leaders of the US Senate intelligence committee on Thursday, conceding that the agency employees spied on committee staff and reversing months of furious and public denials.

Brennan acknowledged that an internal investigation had found agency security personnel transgressed a firewall set up on a CIA network, which allowed Senate committee investigators to review agency documents for their landmark inquiry into CIA torture.

Among other things, it was revealed that agency officials conducted keyword searches and email searches on committee staff while they used the network.

The London Daily Mail has the inevitable mea culpa:

CIA director apologizes after government spooks snooped on US Senate computers

  • John Brennan said he’s investigating the CIA employees who hacked into Senate Intelligence Committee PCs
  • CIA created a fake user account to retrieve documents they believed Senate staffers had improperly accessed
  • Department of Justice has no plans to prosecute anyone

And from The Hill, a reasonable call:

Senators call for CIA chief’s resignation

Pressure is building on CIA Director John Brennan to resign following the agency’s admission Thursday that it spied on the computers of Senate staffers.

Two members of the Senate Intelligence Committee called for Brennan’s resignation on Thursday after a classified briefing on an agency watchdog report that concluded five CIA staffers had “improperly accessed” Senate computers.

Sen. Mark Udall (D-Colo.) became the first senator to make the call when he issued a statement declaring that he had “no choice but to call for the resignation of CIA Director John Brennan.”

“The CIA unconstitutionally spied on Congress by hacking into Senate Intelligence Committee computers,” he said.

More details from the Associated Press:

Leaked White House file addresses ‘torture by CIA’

The State Department has endorsed the broad conclusions of a harshly critical Senate report on the CIA’s interrogation and detention practices after the 9/11 attacks that accuses the agency of brutally treating terror suspects and misleading Congress, according to a White House document.

“This report tells a story of which no American is proud,” says the four-page document, which contains the State Department’s preliminary proposed talking points in response to the classified Senate report, a summary of which is expected to be released in the coming weeks.

“But it is also part of another story of which we can be proud,” adds the document, which was circulating this week among White House officials and which the White House accidentally e-mailed to an Associated Press reporter. “America’s democratic system worked just as it was designed to work in bringing an end to actions inconsistent with our democratic values.”

Still more from Techdirt:

CIA Torture Report Reveals That State Department Officials Knew About Torture; Were Told Not To Tell Their Bosses

  • from the loose-lips-stop-war-crimes dept

We continue to wait and wait for the White House to finish pouring black ink all over the Senate’s torture report, before releasing the (heavily redacted) 480-page executive summary that the Senate agreed to declassify months ago. However, every few weeks it seems that more details from the report leak out to the press anyway. The latest is that officials at the State Department were well aware of the ongoing CIA torture efforts, but were instructed not to tell their superiors, such that it’s likely that the top officials, including Secretary of State Colin Powell, may have been kept in the dark, while others at the State Department knew of the (highly questionable) CIA actions.

A Senate report on the CIA’s interrogation and detention practices after the 9/11 attacks concludes that the agency initially kept the secretary of state and some U.S. ambassadors in the dark about harsh techniques and secret prisons, according to a document circulating among White House staff.

The still-classified report also says some ambassadors who were informed about interrogations of al-Qaida detainees at so-called black sites in their countries were instructed not to tell their superiors at the State Department, the document says.

Still more from the Guardian:

CIA initially ‘kept Colin Powell in the dark’ about torture practices

  • It’s not entirely clear exactly which US officials knew about the practices at the time they began, a Senate report concludes

A Senate report on the CIA’s interrogation and detention practices after the 9/11 attacks concludes that the agency initially kept the secretary of state and some US ambassadors in the dark about harsh techniques and secret prisons, according to a document circulating among White House staff.

The still-classified report also says some ambassadors who were informed about interrogations of al-Qaida detainees at so-called black sites in their countries were instructed not to tell their superiors at the State Department, the document says.

The 6,300-page Senate report on the CIA’s interrogation program has been years in the making. The findings are expected to reveal additional details about the CIA’s program and renew criticisms that the US engaged in torture as it questioned terrorism suspects after the 2001 attacks.

From Wired threat level, Keeping us ignorant:

U.S. Marshals Seize Cops’ Spying Records to Keep Them From the ACLU

A routine request in Florida for public records regarding the use of a surveillance tool known as a stingray took an extraordinary turn recently when federal authorities seized the documents before police could release them.

The surprise move by the U.S. Marshals Service stunned the American Civil Liberties Union, which earlier this year filed the public records request with the Sarasota, Florida, police department for information detailing its use of the controversial surveillance tool.

Stingrays, also known as IMSI catchers, simulate a cellphone tower and trick nearby mobile devices into connecting with them, thereby revealing their location. A stingray can see and record a device’s unique ID number and traffic data, as well as information that points to its location. By moving a stingray around, authorities can triangulate a device’s location with greater precision than is possible using data obtained from a carrier’s fixed tower location.

And from Techdirt, in cyberspace nobody can hear you scream:

Court Says Who Cares If Ireland Is Another Country, Of Course DOJ Can Use A Warrant To Demand Microsoft Cough Up Your Emails

  • from the say-what-now? dept

A NY judge has ruled against Microsoft in a rather important case concerning the powers of the Justice Department to go fishing for information in other countries — and what it means for privacy laws in those countries. As you may recall, back in April, we wrote about a magistrate judge first ruling that the DOJ could issue a warrant demanding email data that Microsoft held overseas, on servers in Dublin, Ireland. Microsoft challenged that, pointing out that you can’t issue a warrant in another country. However, the magistrate judge said that this “warrant” wasn’t really a “warrant” but a “hybrid warrant/subpoena.” That is when the DOJ wanted it to be like a warrant, it was. When it wanted it to be like a subpoena, it was.

Microsoft fought back, noting that the distinction between a warrant and a subpoena is a rather important one. And you can’t just say “hey, sure that’s a warrant, but we’ll pretend it’s a subpoena.” As Microsoft noted:

This interpretation not only blatantly rewrites the statute, it reads out of the Fourth Amendment the bedrock requirement that the Government must specify the place to be searched with particularity, effectively amending the Constitution for searches of communications held digitally. It would also authorize the Government (including state and local governments) to violate the territorial integrity of sovereign nations and circumvent the commitments made by the United States in mutual legal assistance treaties expressly designed to facilitate cross-border criminal investigations. If this is what Congress intended, it would have made its intent clear in the statute. But the language and the logic of the statute, as well as its legislative history, show that Congress used the word “warrant” in ECPA to mean “warrant,” and not some super-powerful “hybrid subpoena.” And Congress used the term “warrant” expecting that the Government would be bound by all the inherent limitations of warrants, including the limitation that warrants may not be issued to obtain evidence located in the territory of another sovereign nation.

Off to Germany and humor with serious intent from the Guardian:

Bug spotting: Germans hold ‘nature walks’ to observe rare NSA spy

  • Weekly walks from Griesheim to nearby US Dagger Complex lead way in multi-generational protest against digital surveillance

One morning last July, the German intelligence service knocked on Daniel Bangert’s door. They had been informed by the US military police that Bangert was planning to stage a protest outside the Dagger Complex, an American intelligence base outside Griesheim in the Hesse region. Why hadn’t he registered the protest, and what were his political affiliations? they asked.

Bangert explained that he wasn’t planning a protest and that he didn’t have any links to political groups. All he had done was put a message on Facebook inviting friends to go on a “nature walk” to “explore the endangered habitat of NSA spies”. Eventually, the agents left in frustration.

Twelve months later, Bangert’s nature trail has not only become a weekly ritual in Griesheim, but also the frontrunner of a new multi-generational German protest movement against digital surveillance.

RT covers another German NSA-related story:

Germany rolls out surveillance-proof phone after NSA spying debacle

Program notes:

Germany is looking to take-on the NSA on its own ground – technology. It has come up with a cell phone which is claimed to be spy-proof. RT’s Peter Oliver talks to Karsten Nohl, crypto specialist, Security Research Labs.

And from the Guardian, a new lower profile:

NSA keeps low profile at hacker conventions despite past appearances

  • Though agency actively recruits security engineers and experts, NSA chiefs won’t speak at Black Hat or Def Con this year

As hackers prepare to gather in Las Vegas for a pair of annual conventions, the leadership of the National Security Agency won’t make the trek.

While the technically sophisticated US surveillance entity has often mingled in recent years with some of the world’s elite engineers and digital security experts at Black Hat and Def Con, Admiral Mike Rogers and Rick Ledgett, the newly minted director and deputy director of the agency, won’t prowl the Mandalay Bay and Rio hotel-casinos this year.

Vanee Vines, a spokeswoman for the NSA who confirmed Rogers and Ledgett’s absences, said she was unaware of any invitations the hacker conferences extended to NSA officials, and did not know if staffers would attend, either.

From BBC News, a whistleblower’s uncertain fate:

Snowden’s temporary asylum status expires in Russia

Fugitive US whistleblower Edward Snowden’s year-long leave to stay in Russia has expired without confirmation that it will be extended.

His lawyer said he could stay in the country while his application for an extension was being processed.

The man who exposed US intelligence practices to the world’s media won leave to remain in Moscow a year ago.

From the London Telegraph, a Cold War tradition continues:

Vienna named as global spying hub in new book

  • Vienna is the world leader in espionage with at least 7,000 spies plying their trade in the Austrian capital

Its reputation as a centre of espionage long predates its notoriety as the setting for the 1949 film The Third Man but only now can a figure be put on the number of spies operating in Vienna.

A survey compiled by experts in spying activities in the Austrian capital shows that at least 7,000 agents work undercover in the city.

As neutral country, Vienna was a Cold War spying hub where both sides were able to ply their trade and openly dealt with each other. Its allure was explained in the opening sequence in the Third Man when the narrator observed that Vienna allows agents a free run: “We’d run anything if people wanted it enough, and had the money to pay.”

From EurActiv, secrecy in the interest of corporadoes and banksters:

EU Ombudsman demands more TTIP transparency

The European Ombudsman today (31 July) opened two investigations into the EU Council and Commission over a lack of transparency around the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP).

Emily O’Reilly investigates complaints about maladministration in the EU institutions. She called on both Council and Commission to publish EU negotiating directives related to the EU-US trade deal, and take measures to ensure timely public access to TTIP documents, and stakeholder meetings.

It is a blow to the Commission, which has regularly protested that the talks are the most open ever held. MEPs, pressure groups, unions and other organisations have said that they are not transparent enough.

RT covers a symbolic hack:

Anonymous ‘knocks out’ Mossad website over Israel’s Gaza offensive

Hacker group Anonymous has reportedly taken down the website of the Israeli secret service Mossad in protest of Israel’s military incursion in Gaza. The ‘hacktivists’ have already targeted a number of organizations in their mission to stop the “genocide.”

Mossad’s website went offline at around 00:40 GMT and is still down at the time of writing. The Israeli government has yet to make any comment on the supposed hack attack.

In a previous attack on Monday, Anonymous knocked out multiple Israeli government sites after one of the organization’s members died in the West Bank over the weekend. 22-year-old Tayeb Abu Shehada was killed during a protest in the village of Huwwara in the West Bank after Israeli settlers and soldiers opened fire on demonstrators, reported Bethlehem-based Ma’an News Agency.

Off to Asia and still more NSA-directed ire — this time from India. Via the Hindu:

Sushma confronts Kerry with snooping

In India’s strongest statement on the issue yet, External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj called the U.S. surveillance of Indian entities “unacceptable”, and said she had taken up the issue of “snooping” by the National Security Agency (NSA) with Secretary of State John Kerry during the India-U.S. strategic dialogue here on Thursday.

“I did raise the snooping issue with Mr. Kerry,” Ms. Swaraj told presspersons at a joint press conference. “I told him that people in India were angry. I told him that since we are friendly nations, it is not acceptable to us.”

In reply, Mr. Kerry said, “We do not discuss intelligence matters in public. We value our relationship with India. President [Barack] Obama has undertaken a unique and unprecedented review of our intelligence.”Ms. Swaraj said India and the U.S. had now hit a “new level” in their relationship.

From the Associated Press, adding some spin, the latest from a militarized Thailand:

Thai junta appoints army-dominated legislature

Thailand’s junta has appointed a military-dominated interim legislature in another step in the slow return of promised electoral democracy. The junta announced Thursday night that King Bhumibol Adulyadej has officially endorsed the appointments.

The junta, which took power on May 22, announced a timetable a month ago for the gradual return to nominally civilian rule, culminating in a general election late next year.

Just over half of the 200 members of the interim legislature, formally known as the National Legislative Assembly, hold military ranks, and 11 are police. It is to convene on Aug. 7 and is to nominate an interim prime minister. The junta, officially called the National Council for Peace and Order, has already given itself what amounts to supreme power over political developments.

Want China Times draws a trans-Pacific line:

Canada has to pick between China and the US

Former Canadian ambassador to Beijing David Mulroney said recently that the intensifying relationship between Canada and China has been seen in both a positive and a negative light in his country.

Mulroney said that although the economic and trade relationship between the two countries has improved since 2012, especially in light of Canada’s increased uranium exports to China, and a memorandum of understanding on cooperation in agricultural technologies and agricultural trade signed during agricultural minister Gerry Ritz’s trip to Beijing in June of this year and the additional trade service offices that Canada plans to set up in China, boosting the number from four to 15, suspicion between the two countries is on the rise.

The Canada-China Foreign Investment Promotion and Protection Agreement, which has already been ratified by Beijing, is yet to be adopted by the Canadian government pending a legal challenge. The intensifying strategic contest between the US and China in the Asia-Pacific is also putting a damper on the Sino-Canadian economic and trade relationship.

From Xinhua, another trans-Pacific tension:

China accuses U.S. over military reconnaissance

China’s Defense Ministry on Thursday accused the United States of regular reconnaissance by naval ships and aircraft in Chinese waters and airspace.

“Vessels and aircraft of the U.S. military have for a long time carried out frequent reconnaissance in waters and airspace under Chinese jurisdiction, which seriously affects China’s national security and could easily cause accidents,” spokesman Geng Yansheng said at a monthly briefing.

His comments came in response to a question regarding a Chinese naval ship’s sailing in areas near the ongoing U.S.-organized RIMPAC (Exercise Rim of the Pacific) maritime exercise.

From South China Morning Post, a military concomitant:

Millions of Hong Kong fliers delayed by mainland military restrictions

  • About 100,000 flights using Chek Lap Kok each year have up to 20 minutes added to flight time thanks to height restrictions, analysis shows

About 100,000 flights carrying almost 15 million passengers to and from Hong Kong airport each year are affected by military airspace restrictions, analysis of official civil aviation data shows.

Environmental group Green Sense and the Airport Development Concern Network revealed their analysis yesterday, pointing out that a so-called “sky wall” imposed by the PLA was extending flight times by between 10 and 20 minutes.

“We found that, between 2010 and 2012, about 30 per cent of planes needed to fly through this ‘sky wall’. It is not the 23 per cent the Airport Authority has claimed,” network spokesman Michael Mo said.

From NHK WORLD, a pointed gesture:

Japan’s GSDF, Australian troops plan joint drills

Japan’s Ground Self-Defense Force will hold a disaster-preparedness drill with US and Australian forces in northeastern Japan in November.

Chief of Staff Kiyofumi Iwata of the Ground Self-Defense Force made the announcement at a news conference on Thursday.

Iwata said Japanese, US, and Australian troops will simulate a response to a massive earthquake in Miyagi Prefecture and other areas for 4 days starting from November 6th.

And a vulnerability reminder from WIRED:

Hackers Can Control Your Phone Using a Tool That’s Already Built Into It

A lot of concern about the NSA’s seemingly omnipresent surveillance over the last year has focused on the agency’s efforts to install back doors in software and hardware. Those efforts are greatly aided, however, if the agency can piggyback on embedded software already on a system that can be exploited.

Two researchers have uncovered such built-in vulnerabilities in a large number of smartphones that would allow government spies and sophisticated hackers to install malicious code and take control of the device.

The attacks would require proximity to the phones, using a rogue base station or femtocell, and a high level of skill to pull off. But it took Mathew Solnik and Marc Blanchou, two research consultants with Accuvant Labs, just a few months to discover the vulnerabilities and exploit them.

Plus a puzzler from TMZ:

Hollywood Cops, Prosecutors Stumped Over Drones

Hollywood cops and prosecutors want to go after a guy who flew a drone over the Hollywood police dept., but we’ve learned they’re stumped.

Law enforcement sources tell TMZ … several people have become a thorn in the side of the LAPD — trying to expose what they claim are police misdeeds.  One of them flew a drone over the Hollywood Division Tuesday afternoon, shooting video of the parking lot with prisoners and undercover officers.

The parking lot is shielded by a wall for security reasons — so it’s not visible from the street.

We’re told police detectives and lawyers from the L.A. County D.A. and the L.A. City Attorney had a meeting to figure out what criminal laws might have been violated, but they concluded as long as the drone flies lower than 400 feet … there’s nothing they can do.  Anything above is covered by the FAA.

For our final item, cross-border security hypocrisy from the Washington Post:

House GOP leaders spike border bill rather than see it defeated

House Republican leaders were ambushed by another conservative insurrection on Thursday, forced to scrap a pivotal vote on a border security bill and scramble to find a solution amid a familiar whirlwind of acrimony and finger-pointing.

The failure to move forward with legislation aimed at coping with a surge of unaccompanied minors at the U.S.-Mexico border left Republicans unable to act on a problem that they have repeatedly described as a national crisis. As the drama unfolded in the House, the Senate also failed to advance legislation to address the immigration crisis, unable to overcome a procedural hurdle and then leaving town for five-week summer break.

The congressional chaos ensured that President Obama’s administration will not have the resources necessary to stem the recent tide of tens of thousands of migrants from Central America, many of them children entering the United States alone, until mid-September at the earliest. The only two significant measures approved by Congress as of Thursday were bills authorizing broad reforms at the Department of Veterans Affairs and a nine-month -extension of federal highway-construction funding.

Quote of the day: The non-barking watchdog


From “The Secrecy Complex and The Press in Post-9/11 America,” a Chattaqua Institution speech delivered earlier this month by recently fired New York Times Executive Editor Jill Abramson. The full summary and an audio of the speech are here:

In her long career of covering Washington and in her executive role at the Times, Abramson has frequently been charged with deciding whether to print sensitive stories, calling this dilemma a “balancing test” in which members of the press weigh national security concerns against the public’s right to know about government activities.

In the aftermath of 9/11, Abramson said, the press listened closely to the government in deciding what to print. 

“In some ways, it wasn’t complicated to make that agreement, because the press always will not reveal certain sensitive intelligence information about, for instance, troop movements,” she said. “In general, you do not publish stories where you know publishing details are going to put anybody’s life in immediate danger.”

But as the Iraq War coalesced in 2003, Abramson admitted to a failure of the press to maintain true skepticism of the government.

“The press, in some ways, let the public down,” she said. “The press, including The New York Times , I will freely say, was not skeptical enough about the so-called ‘evidence’ about Saddam Hussein and weapons of mass destruction.”

The torture and prisoner abuse scandal at Abu Ghraib in 2003 and 2004 was another wake-up call to the press, Abramson said. Then, in 2005, the Times ran a Pulitzer Prize-winning story that revealed warrantless wiretapping by the National Security Agency — a report that had been held for a year at the behest of personnel within the Bush administration. 

Mark Fiore: Flying high with a high flyer


Another cheery animation from editorial cartoonist Mark Fiore and a perfect accompaniment for our Chart of the Day below.

From Mark Fiore:

Blasty the Drone, To Protect & Swerve

Program notes:

The rise of killer drones abroad continues, as does the rise of fireworks-photographing, beer-delivering drones at home. With a huge variety of uses and a very politicized, lethal start, these robots in the sky promise to be one of the most difficult-to-regulate gadgets in the United States.

The epochal hypocrisy of pot legaliation foes


First, a video report from Abby Martin’s Breaking the Set:

Big Pharma Wants You High on Pills Not Weed | Interview with Sam Sacks

Program notes:

Abby Martin speaks with RT political commentator, Sam Sacks, discussing the shift in state policy on marijuana use, citing a report by journalist Lee Fang that outlines why marijuana is such a threat to the bottom line of American pharmaceutical companies.

And from that lengthy report by Lee Fang in the Nation here’s an excerpt examining on the largest group of pot legalization opponents, the Community Anti-Drug Coalition of America:

Given that CADCA is dedicated to protecting society from dangerous drugs, the event that day had a curious sponsor: Purdue Pharma, the manufacturer of Oxy-Contin, the highly addictive painkiller that nearly ruined [pot leglatization foe and CADCA event speaker then-Rep. Patrick] Kennedy’s congressional career and has been linked to thousands of overdose deaths nationwide.

Prescription opioids, a line of pain-relieving medications derived from the opium poppy or produced synthetically, are the most dangerous drugs abused in America, with more than 16,000 deaths annually linked to opioid addiction and overdose. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that more Americans now die from painkillers than from heroin and cocaine combined. The recent uptick in heroin use around the country has been closely linked to the availability of prescription opioids, which give their users a similar high and can trigger a heroin craving in recovering addicts. (Notably, there are no known deaths related to marijuana, although there have been instances of impaired driving.)

People in the United States, a country in which painkillers are routinely overprescribed, now consume more than 84 percent of the entire worldwide supply of oxycodone and almost 100 percent of hydrocodone opioids. In Kentucky, to take just one example, about one in fourteen people is misusing prescription painkillers, and nearly 1,000 Kentucky residents are dying every year.

So it’s more than a little odd that CADCA and the other groups leading the fight against relaxing marijuana laws, including the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids (formerly the Partnership for a Drug-Free America), derive a significant portion of their budget from opioid manufacturers and other pharmaceutical companies. According to critics, this funding has shaped the organization’s policy goals: CADCA takes a softer approach toward prescription-drug abuse, limiting its advocacy to a call for more educational programs, and has failed to join the efforts to change prescription guidelines in order to curb abuse. In contrast, CADCA and the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids have adopted a hard-line approach to marijuana, opposing even limited legalization and supporting increased police powers.

Read the rest.

Ah, the breathtaking hypocrisy of it all.

Keiser Report: What recovery? And hold on!


All that talk of recovery is a fraud, says a leading British financial journalist, and Crash II is on it’s way.

While the meat of this latest edition of Max’s long-running RT show is in the second half interview with scribe Liam Halligan, in the opening minutes Max and Stacy Herbert do a deft debunking of the language of traders and economists to reveal the meaning of all those words so blithely bandied about.

But it’s Halligan who gets to the root of the recovery myth, and what he has to say will throw a sizable chill on your day.

From RT:

Keiser Report: Casino Gulag

Program notes:

In this episode of the Keiser Report, Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert the nouns, like ‘poor,’ who want to be known as verbs, like ‘can’t make ends meet,’ and the thieving verbs (i.e., ‘defrauding investors,’ ‘manipulating markets’) who want to be called nouns, like ‘wealth creator.’ In the second half, Max interviews Liam Halligan about his recent Spectator cover story, “The Next Crash: We could be on the brink of another financial crisis.” They look at derivatives, leverage, GDP and more.

Quote of the day: The madness of pot busts


Following up on Sunday’s lead editorial call for an end to federal marijuana prohibition, the New York Times is back again today with an editorial on pot possession busts, which includes this:

From 2001 to 2010, the police made more than 8.2 million marijuana arrests; almost nine in 10 were for possession alone. In 2011, there were more arrests for marijuana possession than for all violent crimes put together.

The costs of this national obsession, in both money and time, are astonishing. Each year, enforcing laws on possession costs more than $3.6 billion, according to the American Civil Liberties Union. It can take a police officer many hours to arrest and book a suspect. That person will often spend a night or more in the local jail, and be in court multiple times to resolve the case. The public-safety payoff for all this effort is meager at best: According to a 2012 Human Rights Watch report that tracked 30,000 New Yorkers with no prior convictions when they were arrested for marijuana possession, 90 percent had no subsequent felony convictions. Only 3.1 percent committed a violent offense.

The strategy is also largely futile. After three decades, criminalization has not affected general usage; about 30 million Americans use marijuana every year. Meanwhile, police forces across the country are strapped for cash, and the more resources they devote to enforcing marijuana laws, the less they have to go after serious, violent crime. According to F.B.I. data, more than half of all violent crimes nationwide, and four in five property crimes, went unsolved in 2012.

The editorial also calls out the radical racial disparities in pot possession arrests, nothing that in some counties, blacks are 30 times more likely that whites to be arrested.

And to make you really, really insecure. . .


Just watch this chilling compendium assembled by John Oliver for the latest installment of his HBO series Last Week Tonight with John Oliver.

By the time you’ve finished his debunking of the purported security of America’s nukes, you’ll be thoroughly disabused of any lingering doubt that, as Pogo famously said, “We have met the enemy, and he is us.”

From Last Week Tonight with John Oliver

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Nuclear Weapons

Program notes:

America has over 4,800 nuclear weapons, and we don’t take terrific care of them.

It’s terrifying, basically.

Quote of the day: The smoking lamp is lit


BLOG Times

Or at least it should be, says today’s New Work Times lead editorial, calling for an end to the repressive federal laws against marijuana [the graphic is theirs, too]:

It took 13 years for the United States to come to its senses and end Prohibition, 13 years in which people kept drinking, otherwise law-abiding citizens became criminals and crime syndicates arose and flourished. It has been more than 40 years since Congress passed the current ban on marijuana, inflicting great harm on society just to prohibit a substance far less dangerous than alcohol.

The federal government should repeal the ban on marijuana.

>snip<

While waiting for Congress to evolve, President Obama, once a regular recreational marijuana smoker, could practice some evolution of his own. He could order the attorney general to conduct the study necessary to support removal of marijuana from Schedule I. Earlier this year, he told The New Yorker that he considered marijuana less dangerous than alcohol in its impact on individuals, and made it clear that he was troubled by the disproportionate number of arrests of African-Americans and Latinos on charges of possession. For that reason, he said, he supported the Colorado and Washington experiments.

“It’s important for it to go forward,” he said, referring to the state legalizations, “because it’s important for society not to have a situation in which a large portion of people have at one time or another broken the law and only a select few get punished.”

But a few weeks later, he told CNN that the decision on whether to change Schedule I should be left to Congress, another way of saying he doesn’t plan to do anything to end the federal ban. For too long, politicians have seen the high cost — in dollars and lives locked behind bars — of their pointless war on marijuana and chosen to do nothing. But many states have had enough, and it’s time for Washington to get out of their way.

At the end of the editorial is a note reporting that editorial page editor Abe Rosenthal will be taking part in an online discussion about the paper’s new position.

The session begins, appropriately, at 4:20 p.m. EDT.

InSecurity Watch: Spooks, hacks, & tensions


Today’s collection of headlines about matters of spooks, soldiers, and privacy privateers begins with the unsurprising but notable, via the Washington Post:

Proliferation of new online communications services poses hurdles for law enforcement

Federal law enforcement and intelligence authorities say they are increasingly struggling to conduct court-ordered wiretaps on suspects because of a surge in chat services, instant-messaging and other online communications that lack the technical means to be intercepted.

A “large percentage” of wiretap orders to pick up the communications of suspected spies and foreign agents are not being fulfilled, FBI officials said. Law enforcement agents are citing the same challenge in criminal cases; agents, they say, often decline to even seek orders when they know firms lack the means to tap into a suspect’s communications in real time.

“It’s a significant problem, and it’s continuing to get worse,” Amy S. Hess, executive assistant director of the FBI’s Science and Technology Branch, said in a recent interview.

From the McClatchy Washington Bureau, Big Brother is watching:

After CIA gets secret whistleblower email, Congress worries about more spying

The CIA obtained a confidential email to Congress about alleged whistleblower retaliation related to the Senate’s classified report on the agency’s harsh interrogation program, triggering fears that the CIA has been intercepting the communications of officials who handle whistleblower cases.

The CIA got hold of the legally protected email and other unspecified communications between whistleblower officials and lawmakers this spring, people familiar with the matter told McClatchy. It’s unclear how the agency obtained the material.

At the time, the CIA was embroiled in a furious behind-the-scenes battle with the Senate Intelligence Committee over the panel’s investigation of the agency’s interrogation program, including accusations that the CIA illegally monitored computers used in the five-year probe. The CIA has denied the charges.

The email controversy points to holes in the intelligence community’s whistleblower protection systems and raises fresh questions about the extent to which intelligence agencies can elude congressional oversight.

Defense One charts spooky trepidation:

The CIA Fears the Internet of Things

The major themes defining geo-security for the coming decades were explored at a forum on “The Future of Warfare” at the Aspen Security Forum on Thursday, moderated by Defense One Executive Editor Kevin Baron.

Dawn Meyerriecks, the deputy director of the Central Intelligence Agency’s directorate of science and technology, said today’s concerns about cyber war don’t address the looming geo-security threats posed by the Internet of Things, the embedding of computers, sensors, and Internet capabilities into more and more physical objects.

“Smart refrigerators have been used in distributed denial of service attacks,” she said. At least one smart fridge played a role in a massive spam attack last year, involving more than 100,000 internet-connected devices and more than 750,000 spam emails. She also mentioned “smart fluorescent LEDs [that are] are communicating that they need to be replaced but are also being hijacked for other things.

And from The Intercept, partners in crime:

The NSA’s New Partner in Spying: Saudi Arabia’s Brutal State Police

The National Security Agency last year significantly expanded its cooperative relationship with the Saudi Ministry of Interior, one of the world’s most repressive and abusive government agencies. An April 2013 top secret memo provided by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden details the agency’s plans “to provide direct analytic and technical support” to the Saudis on “internal security” matters.

The Saudi Ministry of Interior—referred to in the document as MOI— has been condemned for years as one of the most brutal human rights violators in the world. In 2013, the U.S. State Department reported that “Ministry of Interior officials sometimes subjected prisoners and detainees to torture and other physical abuse,” specifically mentioning a 2011 episode in which MOI agents allegedly “poured an antiseptic cleaning liquid down [the] throat” of one human rights activist. The report also notes the MOI’s use of invasive surveillance targeted at political and religious dissidents.

But as the State Department publicly catalogued those very abuses, the NSA worked to provide increased surveillance assistance to the ministry that perpetrated them. The move is part of the Obama Administration’s increasingly close ties with the Saudi regime; beyond the new cooperation with the MOI, the memo describes “a period of rejuvenation” for the NSA’s relationship with the Saudi Ministry of Defense.

IDG News Service covers another partnership:

Dutch spy agencies can receive NSA data, court rules

Dutch intelligence services can receive bulk data that might have been obtained by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) through mass data interception programs, even though collecting data that way is illegal for the Dutch services, the Hague District Court ruled Wednesday.

The possibility that data received by Dutch intelligence services AIVD and MIVD could have been collected in a way that would not be legal for the Dutch services, doesn’t mean that receiving this data violates international and national treaties, the court said.

The Hague District Court ruled in a civil case file by a coalition of defense lawyers, privacy advocates and journalists who sued the Dutch government last November. They sought a court order to stop the AIVD and MIVD from obtaining data from foreign intelligence agencies that was not obtained in accordance with European and Dutch law.

A tale of dissension from the McClatchy Washington Bureau:

In Kansas, candidates spar over NSA

As a member of the House Select Committee on Intelligence, Kansas Rep. Mike Pompeo had a front-row seat to the brouhaha that erupted in Washington last year over revelations that the government was secretly collecting Americans’ data.

Todd Tiahrt, Pompeo’s challenger in the upcoming Republican primary for Kansas’ 4th Congressional District, has seized on the incumbent’s proximity to the controversy _ and his voting record _ to attack him. Now Pompeo finds himself in the awkward position of defending the National Security Agency’s surveillance program while campaigning as a tea party stalwart who sympathizes with voters’ distrust of the federal government.

Tiahrt is vulnerable on the issue of privacy too. As a former congressman who also served on the intelligence committee, he voted in favor of warrantless wiretapping and the Patriot Act, which expanded the government’s surveillance powers _ facts that the Pompeo campaign is quick to point out.

While the Washington Post covers the not-so-spooky:

CNN’s Diana Magnay is latest reminder that Twitter can be a journalist’s worst enemy

Since the advent of Twitter, Facebook and other instantaneous digital platforms, reporters have lost their jobs, been suspended or been reassigned after posting things deemed inappropriate by readers, viewers and — most important — their bosses. The objectionable posts have usually called into question the journalists’ ability to remain neutral and fair to both sides of any story.

The latest casualty: CNN correspondent Diana Magnay, who last week stirred criticism for a tweet about a group of Israelis who were cheering a missile attack on Gaza. Magnay said in her tweet that members of the group had threatened her. “Scum,” she concluded. Amid an outraged reaction, the network apologized, saying Magnay was referring only to the group’s alleged harassment of her, not to its support of the military action. She was quickly reassigned to Moscow.

The incident echoed CNN’s dismissal in 2010 of Octavia Nasr, a longtime foreign-affairs editor. The network cut Nasr loose after she tweeted her thoughts about the death of a leader of Hezbollah, the Lebanese terrorist organization, calling him “one of Hezbollah’s giants I respect a lot.”

From intelNews, Washington pulls the reins:

Aruba arrests ex-head of Venezuelan intelligence, after US request

The former director of Venezuela’s military intelligence, who was a close associate of the country’s late president Hugo Chavez, has been arrested in Aruba following a request by the United States. Authorities in the Dutch-controlled Caribbean island announced on Thursday the arrest of Hugo Carvajal Barrios, former director of Venezuela’s Dirección General de Inteligencia Militar (DGIM), which is Venezuela’s military intelligence agency. A close comrade of Venezuela’s late socialist leader, Carvajal was accused by the US Department of the Treasury in 2008 of weapons and drugs smuggling. According to the US government, Carvajal was personally involved in illegally providing weapons to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), a leftwing guerrilla group involved in a decades-long insurgency war against the government of Colombia.

It also accused the Venezuelan official of helping the FARC smuggle cocaine out of the country, in a bid to help them raise funds to support their insurgency against Colombian authorities. But the government of Venezuela rejects all charges and has been sheltering Carvajal. In January of this year it appointed him consul-general to Aruba, a Dutch colony in the Caribbean located just 15 miles off Venezuela’s coast.

Bloomberg raises the terror alert:

Norway on High Alert Amid Warnings of Attack Next Week

Police in Norway are on high alert after receiving intelligence that nationals returning from Syria may be plotting a terrorist attack within days against the Scandinavian country.

Information obtained by Norway’s security service, PST, suggests an attack could be imminent, the unit’s chief, Benedicte Bjoernland, said July 24. Authorities have strengthened their presence at Norway’s borders, airports and train stations, and police in all districts are at a heightened state of preparedness.

Police officers in Norway’s capital, Oslo, have been stationed at focal points in the city including parliament and the royal palace as well as at shopping centers, spokesman Kaare Hansen said by phone yesterday. Authorities have followed up on a number of tips received since yesterday, the police said, without providing more details.

More from TheLocal.no:

Statoil tightens security amid terror threat

Statoil, Norway’s biggest energy company, has ‘increased’ security after this week’s terror warning announcement, said the firm’s CEO on Friday.

Helge Lund, Statoil’s CEO, said to NTB that: “The security level of Statoil has increased as a consequence of the terror threat.”
“We are following the situation very closely. We have close contact with Norwegian authorities and are taking the measures we think are necessary, based on their threat evaluations.”

One-and-a-half year ago the company was struck by the worst terror action that has ever been directed towards a Norwegian company, when terrorists attacked the gas facility Tigantourine in In Aménas in Algeria. Five Norwegian Statoil employees were killed during the four days the hostage drama lasted.

Meanwhile, the Toronto Globe and Mail covers consequences of aggression:

The Gaza war has done terrible things to Israeli society

Earlier this month, one of Israel’s most famous writers announced in his weekly newspaper column that he was packing up his family and moving to the United States – permanently. Sayed Kashua, an Arab-Palestinian citizen of Israel who resides in Jerusalem, is the author of critically acclaimed novels and a popular television series, all written in Hebrew with wit and insight into the complex, conflicted society of Arabs and Jews living uneasily side-by-side. But after more than two decades of believing that ultimately Arabs and Jews would find a way to co-exist as equals, he wrote, something inside him “had broken.” He no longer believed in a better future.

Mr. Kashua’s decision to emigrate came in response to a series of events that were marked by violence and incitement against the Arab population, from the government to the street. One member of the Knesset, Israel’s parliament, called for a war against the Palestinian people on her Facebook page. Another called an Arab legislator a “terrorist” during a parliamentary committee session, while still another, the leader of an ostensibly centrist party, submitted a proposal to ban an established Arab nationalist party with sitting members of the Knesset. The editor of a right-wing newspaper suggested that now was the time to transfer the Arab population out of the occupied West Bank. In Jerusalem, mobs of hyper nationalist youth rampaged through the cafe-lined downtown streets chanting “death to Arabs,” assaulting random passersby because they looked or sounded Palestinian.

Most horrifically of all, a 17 year-old Palestinian boy from East Jerusalem was abducted from the street by six young Jewish men, three of them minors. The police found Mohammed Abu Khdeir’s corpse in the nearby Jerusalem Forest shortly after CCTV cameras recorded some young men forcing him into a car. He had been doused with gasoline and burned alive. Three of the six boys confessed to the crime and re-enacted it for the police.

On to the latest developments in the trans-Pacific Game of Zones, via China Daily:

Confessions of Japanese war criminals online

The State Archives Administration started releasing a large number of files on major Japanese war criminals on its website on Thursday to offer a clearer picture of history.

“The confessions written by all the war criminals and the detailed trial records contained in the archived files are irrefutable evidence of the heinous crimes committed by the Japanese militarist aggressors against the Chinese people,” Li Minghua, deputy director of Central Archives of China, said on Thursday.

Since the Abe Cabinet came to power in Japan, it has openly confused right and wrong to mislead the public on history, he said at a news conference of the State Council Information Office.

With the upcoming 77th anniversary of the Marco Polo Bridge Incident – an incident that marked the start of Japan’s full aggression against the nation – the release of such materials can prove their crimes during the Japanese War of Aggression against China, experts said.

Pressure from Foggy Bottom, via the Japan Daily Press:

U.S. Senators seek Obama’s help to resolve issue of ‘comfort women’

With Japan’s announcement last week that it has begun reviewing the accounts of former “comfort women,” a euphemistic term for those forced into sexual labor by the Japanese Imperial Army during the Second World War, former victims and their supporters have expressed outrage over the development. Three senators from the United States are urging President Barack Obama to keep its interest and exert more effort in addressing the matter.

The letter calling for Obama’s actions was signed and sent by Senators Martin Heinrich, Tim Johnson and Mark Begich. The trio called upon the US president’s passionate statement regarding the atrocities done to the women. In his recent trip to Asia, Obama called what was done to the comfort women as a “terrible and egregious violation of human rights.” The trio of senators echoed his statement, noting “We affirm your statement that the ‘women were violated in ways that even in the midst of war was shocking.” They further went on to describe the women’s plight as deserving “to be heard and respected.” The letter closed by expressing their request that he continue to help resolve this particular issue.

The senators believe that finding a resolution to the issue of comfort women will be vital in further improving trilateral ties of the United States with Japan and South Korea. While both Asian countries are known U.S. allies, the two remain at odds with each other because of their wartime history that has prevented them from fostering cordial ties in recent years.

The Asahi Shimbun raises the heat:

NHK governor’s remarks on prewar Koreans in news show may violate law

A conservative Japan Broadcasting Corp. (NHK) governor complained about comments made on prewar Korean immigrants to Japan in a news program, possibly violating the Broadcast Law that forbids governors from interfering with shows, according to insiders.

Naoki Hyakuta questioned and disputed NHK newscaster Kensuke Okoshi’s remarks at a July 22 meeting of the NHK Board of Governors.

Hyakuta, handpicked for the 12-member board by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, is a writer who has generated controversy over his conservative stance on historical issues, such as calling the Nanking Massacre a fabrication crafted to cancel out U.S. atrocities.

Haruo Sudo, a professor emeritus of Hosei University whose specialty is media theory, said Hyakuta’s latest outburst was an obvious violation of the Broadcast Law.

Nextgov covers insecurity closer to home:

Virtual Border Fence Project Halted After Raytheon Protest

A major border security project involving the deployment of 50 surveillance towers across southern Arizona is temporarily on hold, following a protest by Raytheon that the government improperly awarded the work to a rival.

In a protest decision released Thursday afternoon, the Government Accountability Office ruled the Department of Homeland Security should reevaluate the competitors’ proposals. Among other things, it is possible Raytheon was “prejudiced by the agency’s errors” during an evaluation of proposals, the ruling stated.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection — part of DHS — had planned to initially build seven towers during the first year of a potentially 8 and 1/2 year, $145 million deal with vendor EFW, of Fort Worth, Texas. The contract was awarded in February, after a two-year competition among 14 companies.

PandoDaily resets the WABAC  Machine:

Report: Google has removed around 50,000 links thanks to Europe’s “right to be forgotten”

Europeans have asked Google to remove more than 91,000 links from its search results, and the company has granted more than half of those requests, according to a Bloomberg report. Combined, the requests are said to apply to more than 328,000 Internet addresses. The majority of removal requests have come from people who are living in France and Germany.

Google is thought to have revealed these numbers to privacy watchdogs and the press to show that it’s taking the right to be forgotten, which it has criticized in the past for being too broad and difficult to implement, more seriously than it seems. As the Wall Street Journal reports:

Google’s disclosure could also soothe tensions with privacy regulators, who called Thursday’s meeting and have been critical of how the search company has implemented the ruling. Some have been demanding that Google end its notifications to websites that have been the subject of right to be forgotten requests, which have in some cases made it possible to identify the person making the request.

From IDG News Service, a familiar plea, this time from Moscow:

Russian government offers money for identifying Tor users

The Russian Ministry of Interior is willing to pay 3.9 million roubles, or around US$111,000, for a method to identify users on the Tor network.

The Tor software anonymizes Internet traffic by encrypting it and passing it through several random relays in order to prevent potential network eavesdroppers from identifying the traffic’s source and destination. The software was originally developed as a project of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, but is now being maintained by a nonprofit organization called The Tor Project.

The Tor network is popular with journalists, political activists and privacy-conscious users in general, but has also been used by pedophiles and other criminals to hide their tracks from law enforcement.

Four our final items, we focus on another cause for insecurity, at least for half the population. First, this from Newswise:

Link Between Ritual Circumcision Procedure and Herpes Infection in Infants Examined by Penn Medicine Analysis

A rare procedure occasionally performed during Jewish circumcisions that involves direct oral suction is a likely source of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) transmissions documented in infants between 1988 and 2012, a literature review conducted by Penn Medicine researchers and published online in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society found. The reviewers, from Penn’s Center for Evidence-based Practice, identified 30 reported cases in New York, Canada and Israel.

The practice—known as metzitzah b’peh—and its link to HSV-1 infections have sparked international debate in recent years, yet no systematic review of the literature has been published in a peer-reviewed journal examining the association and potential risk. During metzitzah b’peh, the mohel, a Jewish person trained to perform circumcisions, orally extracts a small amount of blood from the circumcision wound and discards it.

Lead author Brian F. Leas, MS, MA, a research analyst in the Center for Evidence-based Practice at the University of Pennsylvania Health System, identified six relevant studies for the systematic review. All six studies were descriptive case reports or case series that documented neonatal HSV-1 infections after circumcision with direct oral suction.

And it’s not just babes in arm with cause for concern. Form the Independent:

US patient Johnny Lee Banks sues doctors over circumcision that ended up as amputation

Something was absent without leave when Johnny Lee Banks came out of the anaesthetic after what should have been a routine circumcision at a hospital in Birmingham, Alabama, last month. That, at least, is the claim in a medical malpractice suit filed this week that has men across the state, if not America, clenching their midriffs in horror.

“When the plaintiff … woke from his aforesaid surgical procedure, his penis was amputated,” the lawsuit states. It goes on to contend that no one at the Princeton Baptist Medical Centre in Birmingham has been able to explain why it had become necessary to remove the entire organ rather than just the foreskin as he had expected.

“My client is devastated,” said John Graves, a lawyer for Mr Banks. The lawsuit names two doctors as defendants in the suit as well as the facility attached to the hospital that was responsible for the procedure. It was filed jointly by Mr Banks, who is 56, and his wife, who is claiming the marvellously legalistic “loss of consortium”.

Pottery Barn Rule redux: Another Iraqi tragedy


Remember the Pottery Barn Rule? That’s how Gen. Colin Powell described American responsibility toward that deeply wounded nation in the wake of Operation Desert Storm, Bush I’s war to destroy the nation then headed by Saddam Hussein: You break it, you buy it.

Turns out that Pottery Barn had no such rule, and now it appears the U.S. doesn’t either.

The latest item to be added to Washington’s tab is the tomb of Jonah, that Old Testament prophet who was swallowed by a whale and acquired a reputation to resisting imperatives.

From RT:

ISIS militants blow up Prophet Jonas’ tomb in Iraq

The shrine of Jonas – revered by Christians and Muslims alike – has been turned “to dust” near Iraq’s Mosul. Footage of the event was posted online, and witnesses said it took ISIS militants just an hour to stuff the mosque with explosives.

“ISIS militants have destroyed the Prophet Younis (Jonah) shrine east of Mosul city after they seized control of the mosque completely,” an anonymous security source told the Iraq-based al-Sumaria News.

The extremist group ISIS changed its name from the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS/ISIL) to just the Islamic State (IS), after formally declaring a new caliphate in Syria and Iraq at the end of June.

Here’s an ISIS video of their assault on history:

So did the White House any idea of what was happening in a nation Washington had blasted back into the Middle Ages?

Of course they did.

From the McClatchy Washington Bureau:

Obama administration knew Islamic State was growing but did little to counter it

Like the rest of the world, the U.S. government appeared to have been taken aback last month when Mosul, Iraq’s second largest city, fell to an offensive by jihadis of the Islamic State that triggered the collapse of five Iraqi army divisions and carried the extremists to the threshold of Baghdad.

A review of the record shows, however, that the Obama administration wasn’t surprised at all.

In congressional testimony as far back as November, U.S. diplomats and intelligence officials made clear that the United States had been closely tracking the al Qaida spinoff since 2012, when it enlarged its operations from Iraq to civil war-torn Syria, seized an oil-rich province there and signed up thousands of foreign fighters who’d infiltrated Syria through NATO ally Turkey.

But, hey, who’s going stop the U.S. from continuing to fuel violent conflicts with little or no regard for the consequences when events turn out far more grim than all those rosy scenarios?