Category Archives: Human behavior

Chart of the day: Old white guys like torture


From the Pew Research Center, a new survey [PDF] shows more Americans back the CIA on torture than oppose it, with the heaviest support coming from older white males [esnl, for one, excepted]:

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Map of the day: Geography of scientific plagiarism


From Science, a map showing the percentages of suspect sources in a study of scientific articles from across the globe:

BLOG Plagiarism

Chart of the day: Differentiating the predatory


From the Pew Research Center:

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EnviroWatch: Water, mud, land, and feces


Plus volcanoes, on an otherwise oddly slow news day. . .

From the Guardian, ungreening:

Safer drinking water: Ohio takes first steps in removing toxins from Lake Erie

  • Legislation would ban farmers from spreading manure on top of frozen or saturated fields, which has been linked to the spread of algae blooms

Ohio’s lawmakers are taking their first step toward slowing the spread of algae in Lake Erie since a toxin contaminated drinking water for more than 400,000 people.

Legislation approved in the state house would ban farmers in much of northwestern Ohio from spreading manure on top of frozen or saturated fields. Another provision would set new rules on dumping dredged sediment in the lake.

Both are thought to contribute to the algae blooms that produce dangerous toxins. But how much the proposed changes – they still need approval in the Ohio senate – would help isn’t certain. Research is limited on how much of the phosphorus that feeds the algae blooms comes from dredging and from livestock farmers spreading manure onto frozen and snow-covered fields in the winter.

The Daily Independent in Lagos, Nigeria, covers a major public health concern in many countries:

Breaking the Silence in Open Defecation

“I am moved by the fact that a child dies every 2 and a half minutes from diseases linked to open defecation. Those are silent deaths – not reported on in the media, not the subject of public debate. Let’s not remain silent any longer”. The above quotation from the UN Deputy Secretary-General, Jan Eliasson, is a clear reflection on the danger of open defecation which has been a common practice in many nations, towns and villages for centuries. It is a practice whereby a person defecates in an open area not meant for that purpose.

Sadly, this practice is still prevalent in Nigeria. Out of about one billion people that practice open defecation worldwide, about 49 million are Nigerians while 600 million reside in India. It is however estimated that around 68 million Nigerians are likely to be added between now and 2025, if concerted efforts were not made to arrest the problem. According to Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (2011), Ekiti state contributes highest to open defecation practice with 60.8 percent followed by Plateau and Oyo states with 56.2 and 54.0 percent respectively. Abia state has the lowest rate followed by Lagos at 1.2 and 2.0 percent respectively. Kano state has 4.0 percent while Zamfara, Benue and Kwara have 9.8, 52.5 and 50.5 respectively.

Open defecation is one of the fundamental aspects of sanitation that mirrors our underdevelopment as a nation. It is a terrible practice with various consequences on human health, dignity and security, the environment, and social and economic development. The profoundly damaging health and developmental consequences of this menace has often been overshadowed by other aspects of our socio-economic life that is also in decay. It is still common to see people defecating openly along the road. Walking along the railroad tracks even gives one more panoramic view of things as people,- male and female- engage in mass open defecation. On the streets, behind bushes, in groves of trees, in rivers or streams, inside drainages, dump sites, in rocky communities, motor parks and markets, people litter everywhere with defecation. Even some of the fanciest areas are not exempted.

Leading landgrabbers name, from the Thomson Reuters Foundation:

Foreign “land grabs” redraw global map of farmland ownership

A handful of wealthy countries are responsible for most international farmland acquisitions – what some critics term “land grabs” – in a trend that is redrawing the global map of land ownership, a new study has found.

China, the United States, Britain, Germany, Singapore and a small group of other nations account for the majority of global land acquisitions, although 126 states participate in the trade, according to research by Sweden’s Lund University.

The deals are “increasingly becoming drivers of land change”, the study said. Some food security experts say the large-scale acquisitions could undermine the livelihoods of small farmers, contribute to environmentally damaging mono crop cultivation, and allow rich countries to exploit poorer nations.

“Some … see these kinds of investments as a way to develop countries while others see them as a new wave of colonisation,” Emma Li Johansson, one of the study’s authors, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. “It depends on your worldview.”

Grabbing water from land, via the Thomson Reuters Foundation:

Drought-hit Sao Paulo may ‘get water from mud’

São Paulo, Brazil’s drought-hit megacity of 20 million, has about two months of guaranteed water supply remaining as it taps into the second of three emergency reserves, officials say.

The city began using its second so-called “technical reserve” 10 days ago to prevent a water crisis after reservoirs reached critically low levels last month.

This is the first time the state has resorted to using the reserves, experts say.

A third and final technical reserve might be used, but it is difficult to access and mixed with silt that could make pumping it to users difficult, according to Vicente Andreu, the president of the water regulatory agency ANA.

“I believe that, technically, it would be unviable. But if it doesn’t rain, we won’t have an alternative but to get water from the mud,” Andreu said at a hearing about the water crisis in Brasilia’s Lower House of Congress on Nov. 13.

And from the Asahi Shimbun, what next?:

Expert group wants 3 more volcanoes added to list under 24-hour watch

An experts’ panel studying the forecasting of volcanic eruptions has urged the government to add three more volcanoes to the 47 under round-the-clock observation, and recommended enhancing monitoring near craters to improve early detection.

A study group set up at the Japan Meteorological Agency’s Coordinating Committee for Prediction of Volcanic Eruptions has been reviewing the volcano monitoring system after volcanologists failed to predict the deadly eruption of Mount Ontakesan in central Japan in late September. The group compiled a report on its proposals on Nov. 28.

The three volcanoes sought for inclusion are Mount Hakkodasan in Aomori Prefecture, where volcanic tremors were observed near the summit in 2013; Mount Midagahara between Toyama and Nagano prefectures, where increases in temperatures have been detected near craters, called fumaroles, since 2012; and Mount Towada, straddling Aomori and Akita prefectures, where an increased frequency of volcanic quakes has been observed this year.

InSecurityWatch: Protest, war, drones, hacks


Plus the showdown in Hong Kong and lots more. . .

We begin with the Los Angeles Times:

Protests over Ferguson shooting enter third day; arrests in St. Louis

Activists rushed into St. Louis City Hall on Wednesday to protest a grand jury decision not to indict a white police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black man in nearby Ferguson as the region moved into its third day of demonstrations.

Hundreds of people demonstrated in front of the municipal building, shouting “Shame, Shame.” Some then entered the building and police, carrying riot shields, quickly responded.

As many as five people were arrested, officials said.

The Los Angeles Times again, with some numbers:

183 Ferguson protesters arrested in L.A., many more than in other cities

Los Angeles police arrested 183 protesters overnight Tuesday — a much larger number than in other major cities in the nation on the second night of protests over the grand jury decision in the Michael Brown shooting case.

Los Angeles Police Department Chief Charlie Beck, at a news conference Wednesday morning, said he could not speak to what had occurred in other parts of the country but that the LAPD and CHP had been “extremely generous in allowing the expression of 1st Amendment activities.”

A bulk of the arrests occurred Tuesday night. Of the 183 held, 167 were arrested for disturbing the peace, 15 juveniles for violating curfew, and one person was taken into custody for alleged felony battery after throwing a frozen water bottle at a police officer’s head, Beck said.

And closer to Casa esnl, via the Oakland Tribune:

Ferguson protest: 92 arrests in Oakland during 2nd night of looting, vandalism

Merchants on Wednesday were mopping up after a second night of vandalism and looting in the wake of a Missouri grand jury’s decision not to indict a police officer in the shooting death of Ferguson teenager Michael Brown.

Tuesday night saw 300 march through downtown and North Oakland — vastly reduced from Monday’s estimated crowd of 2,000 — with protesters taking to the freeways two different times to block lanes.

Officials said officers arrested 92 people on Tuesday night, mostly on charges of obstruction and failure to disperse. Police had arrested 43 people the night before.

From BuzzFeed, across the Atlantic:

Ferguson Protest Brings Parts Of Central London To A Standstill

  • Hundreds of people marched through central London in solidarity with Michael Brown, who was shot dead by police in Ferguson

Hundreds of protestors congregated outside London’s US embassy in the early evening to protest about the death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri.

Brown was shot dead by a police officer earlier this year. On Monday a grand jury decided that no charges would be brought against the officer involved.

Over 500 people were on the protest, which brought one of the capital’s main streets to a standstill.

A video report from RT:

London to Ferguson: Crowd protesting police racism tears down Parliament Square barriers

The McClatchy Washington Bureau makes connections:

Social media help take Ferguson protests national

“When you see people kneeling down on the highway, they’re trained to do that . . . it is just straight-up tactics from the civil rights movement,” James Peterson, director of Africana Studies at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pa., said in an interview Wednesday. “But social media certainly has been a great tool.”

Twitter, the popular micro-blogging service, has been engorged with Ferguson-related postings. Between Tuesday and Wednesday, 580,000 Tweets citing Ferguson were counted by the analytical service Topsy. One targeted hashtag, #BlackLivesMatter, was included in 72,000 Tweets in just one day.

Underscoring the reach of social media, prisoners at Boston’s South Bay Detention Facility held up signs reading “#BlackLivesMatter” to high-security windows. Other social media venues, such as Facebook, have likewise been aflame with Ferguson news and commentary. One page alone, called Justice for Mike Brown, had accumulated 43,934 “Likes” as of Wednesday.

Rounding out our Ferguson items, a graphic take from Jack Ohman, editorial cartoonist for the Sacramento Bee:

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On to the war zones, now with Warthogs, via United Press International:

Air Force to deploy A-10s to combat Islamic State

  • “They’re going over there because there’s a need,” says the Air Force

A group of A-10 Thunderbolt fighter jets has arrived in the Middle East where they will be used to halt the spread of the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq.

The A-10s, or Warthogs, are currently the center of Washington debate — senior defense officials want to retire the 283 remaining A-10s to save nearly $4 billion, while many feel such a move would cut off one of the military’s more powerful tools.

“They’re going over there because there’s a need … to be postured for a combat rescue mission,” Air Force spokeswoman Jennifer Cassidy explained to Stars and Stripes.

Although slow and low flying, A-10s can transport and deploy massive amounts of fire power to support combat troops on the ground. The planes have armored bellies to protect pilots from ground fire, and can be armed with a 30mm Gatling cannon and a variety of bombs, missiles and other explosives.

The Christian Science Monitor has the hush-hush:

Why US is mum on special ops raid that rescued hostages in Yemen

  • Eight hostages were brought to safety Tuesday after an intense firefight at the cave in remote eastern Yemen where the hostages were being held by Al Qaeda

There are two good reasons the cover-of-night, US-led commando raid that rescued eight Al Qaeda hostages in Yemen Tuesday received none of the fanfare and public back-slapping of previous successful counterterror operations.

One is obvious: No Americans were among the hostages – six Yemenis, one Saudi, and one Ethiopian – brought to safety after an intense firefight at the cave in remote eastern Yemen where the hostages were being held.

But the other explanation is that the Obama administration is very much interested in seeing the successful operation, which included both US and Yemeni forces, reinforce Yemeni President Abdu Rabbu Mansour Hadi. He is a stalwart US ally in the fight against Al Qaeda in the region, but his grasp on power has been repeatedly shaken over recent months.

Al Jazeera America covers the latest drone attacks:

US drone strike in Pakistan kills five suspected Taliban fighters

  • Strike follows critical report on number of innocent civilians killed in US drone strikes

A U.S. drone strike on Wednesday killed five suspected militants in northwest Pakistan, a government official said, as an anti-Taliban offensive by the Pakistani military grew in intensity. The deadly strike comes one day after a human rights group issued a report drawing international attention to the number of innocent lives claimed by U.S. drone strikes.

The drone strike on Wednesday targeted a house in Datta Khel near the Afghan border. Pakistani fighters in the area allegedly used the residence as a safe house.

“The Government of Pakistan condemns the drone strike that took place in the early hours of Wednesday, 26 November 2014 at Garga, north of Shawal in North Waziristan Agency,” the government said in a statement.

An update from the Express Tribune in Karachi:

Eight suspected militants killed in North Waziristan drone strike

Eight suspected militants were killed in latest US drone attack in border area of North Waziristan on Wednesday, security officials said.

“The drone fired two missiles, killing at least eight people and injuring two others,” a security official in the area told AFP via phone on condition of anonymity.

“There may be more dead bodies under the rubble,” he said.

The identity of those killed could not be determined immediately, however, few of them are believed to be foreign militants.

The same story as seen by Iran’s PressTV:

US drone attacks kill 11 people in Pakistan, Afghanistan

Program notes:

US assassination drone strikes in Pakistan and neighboring Afghanistan have killed nearly a dozen people.

A drone attack killed eight people in Pakistan’s tribal region along the Afghan border. The unmanned aircraft fired two missiles at a compound in the town of Dattakhel in North Waziristan. Three Afghans lost their lives in a similar attack in Afghanistan’s Laghman province. The US military conducts deadly drone strikes in several Muslim countries including Pakistan, Afghanistan and Yemen. Washington says the air raids target militants, but a large number of civilians have been killed in the attacks.

Drone coverage from the domestic front from the Washington Post:

Near-collisions between drones, airliners surge, new FAA reports show

Pilots around the United States have reported a surge in near-collisions and other dangerous encounters with small drones in the past six months at a time when the Federal Aviation Administration is gradually opening the nation’s skies to remotely controlled aircraft, according to FAA records.

Since June 1, commercial airlines, private pilots and air-traffic controllers have alerted the FAA about at least 25 episodes in which small drones came within a few seconds or a few feet of crashing into much larger aircraft, the records show. Many of the close calls occurred during takeoffs and landings at the nation’s busiest airports, presenting a new threat to aviation safety after decades of steady improvement in air travel.

Many of the previously unreported incident reports — released Wednesday by the FAA in response to long-standing public-records requests from The Washington Post and other news organizations — occurred near New York and Washington.

The Hill clicks Undelete:

National Archives backs off plan to destroy CIA emails

The National Archives and Records Administration is taking a second look at the CIA’s proposal to delete its employees’ emails after they leave the agency.

The record-keeping agency “intends to reassess” the proposal to destroy old emails of all but 22 top officials at the spy agency, chief records officer Paul Wester wrote to the agency last week.
Citing concerns from top congressional overseers and transparency advocates, “we are concerned about the scope of the proposed schedule and the proposed retention periods,” Wester wrote in the letter, which was unearthed by the Federation of American Scientists’s project on government secrecy on Wednesday.

The National Archives had tentatively backed the agency’s proposal to destroy “non-senior” staffers’ emails three years after they leave the agency “or when no longer needed.” At the time, the records agency said that any important communications will likely exist in other formats, which will be catalogued for a permanent record.

The Intercept spins the spin:

The US/UK Campaign to Demonize Social Media Companies as Terrorist Allies

In May, 2013, a British Army soldier, Lee Rigby, was killed on a suburban London street by two Muslim British citizens, who said they were acting to avenge years of killings of innocent Muslims by the British military in, among other places, Afghanistan and Iraq. One of the attackers, Michael Adebolajo, had also been detained and tortured in 2010 in Kenya with the likely complicity of Her Majesty’s Government. The brutal attack on Rigby was instantly branded “terrorism” (despite its targeting of a soldier of a nation at war) and caused intense and virtually universal indignation in the UK.

In response, the British Parliament’s Intelligence and Security Committee resolved to investigate why the attack happened and whether it could have been prevented. Ensuring that nothing undesirable would occur, the investigation was led by the Committee’s chair, the long-time conservative government functionary Sir Malcolm Rifkind. Yesterday, Sir Malcolm’s Committee issued its findings in a 191-page report. It contains some highly predictable conclusions, but also some quite remarkable ones.

Predictably, the report, while offering some criticisms, completely cleared the British intelligence agencies of any responsibility for the attack. It concluded: “we do not consider that any of the Agencies’ errors, when taken individually, were significant enough to have affected the outcome,” and “we do not consider that, given what the Agencies knew at the time, they were in the position to prevent the murder.”

After the jump, the U.N. calls for releasing the CIA torture report, draconian new state security legislation in Old Blighty, France deprivatizes the phone tap, Google European breaking legal questions pondered, ap-tracking Twitter, Hookers in your cell phone, you annual cyberscam warning, China corporateers win disclosure in a U.S. court, Egypt sends children to prison for protesting, the death rattle of the Arab Spring in Cairo, Turkey clamps down on the Fourth Estate, the wrong song sends a Pakistani actress to price for decades, brutality allegations probed in Australian military academies,  Hong Kong police mass to block re-Occupation while some of the colleagues are busted for brutality, and tycoons seek their own Hong Kong asylum. . . Continue reading

EbolaWatch: Prognoses, medicine, Africa news


We begin with a prognosis from Reuters:

Ebola discoverer Piot sees long, bumpy road to ending epidemic

West Africa’s Ebola epidemic could worsen further before abating but new infections should start to decline in all affected countries by the end of this year, a leading specialist on the disease said on Wednesday.

Peter Piot, one of the scientists who first identified the Ebola virus almost 40 years ago, said the outbreak was far from over, but said that “thanks to now massive efforts at all levels” what had been an exponential growth in numbers should soon begin to recede.

The death toll in the worst Ebola epidemic on record has risen to 5,459 out of 15,351 cases identified in eight countries by November 18, latest data from the World Health Organization (WHO) showed. Almost all those cases are in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia.

“By the end of the year we should start seeing a real decline everywhere,” Piot, who is now director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, told a meeting of public health experts, non-governmental organisations and officials.

Taking the curative effort a step closer to the source, via Bloomberg News:

Ebola Scientists Seek Cure With Ape Remedy

Program notes:

Around the world scientists are working on a solution to help the Ebola-stricken areas of western Africa. Closer to home, some British and American virologists are taking a different approach, by seeking to eradicate the disease from the usual source of transmission — apes and chimpanzees — before they pass it on.

A belated effort bearing fruit, from CBC News:

Experimental Ebola vaccine passes 1st hurdle in U.S.

  • Vaccine developed by GlaxoSmithKline and U.S. NIH safely tested on 20 people

The vaccine made by British pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline and the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) is being developed to combat the Sudan and Zaire strains of the Ebola virus, the latter the one behind the current deadly outbreak in West Africa.

The trials were conducted at the NIH in Bethesda, Md., with 20 healthy participants who received doses of the vaccine.

The participants developed antibodies to Ebola, researchers said in Wednesday’s New England Journal of Medicine. But the researchers note participants’ immune responses depended on the dose and were also associated with minor side-effects.

From SciDev.Net, more funds arriving late:

Speedy Ebola test among UK projects given grant

A portable device to test bodily fluids for Ebola in under an hour and anthropological training to help foreign health workers work more effectively with local people in West Africa are among five research programmes being funded by the UK’s Department for International Development and the Wellcome Trust.

The projects were awarded money as part of an emergency call issued in August for research on Ebola supported by the Research for Health in Humanitarian Crises (R2HC) fund, launched last year.

The £1.34 million (US$2.1 million) jointly handed to the projects is dwarfed by the €1 billion (more than US$1.2 billion) pledged by European leaders in October for medical care and assistance in affected countries. It is also less than US$5.7 million promised last week by philanthropic organisation the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, aimed at increasing production of experimental Ebola treatments in these countries

From the Japan Times, a belated European contingent coming:

EU arranging to send 5,000 doctors to Africa to fight Ebola: source

The European Commission called Wednesday for 5,000 doctors to be sent from EU states to combat west Africa’s Ebola epidemic, a European source said on Wednesday.

“The situation is too serious and it needs an immediate response,” the source, who spoke on condition of anonymity, told AFP, adding that senior EU officials were in contact with central governments to mobilize the response.

“Thousands of other medical caregivers were also being called for,” the source said.

In a tweet, EU Health Commissioner Vytenis Andriukaitis said he had so far reached 14 EU ministers, urging them to send more medical staff to Ebola-hit countries.

From the Thomson Reuters Foundation, a call to action:

West African artists urge French-speaking nations to act on Ebola

West African artists have urged heads of state holding a French-speaking nations’ summit in Dakar this weekend to take action to stop the spread of the deadly Ebola virus in the region.

The rare tropical disease has infected more than 15,000 people in West Africa since it was first recorded in Guinea in March. More than 5,000 people have died from the virus, which causes severe vomiting, diarrhoea and internal bleeding.

The theme of this year’s biannual summit of “francophonie”, a 77-strong group whose role includes promoting peace, democracy and human rights, is women and youth.

One to Sierra Leone and a sad landmark ahead, via the New York Times:

Sierra Leone to Eclipse Liberia in Ebola Cases

Sierra Leone will soon displace Liberia as the worst-hit of the West African countries ravaged by Ebola, the World Health Organization said Wednesday.

More than 600 new cases of Ebola were reported in the three countries most affected — Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea — in the week that ended Sunday, and more than half were in Sierra Leone, according to figures in an updated summary of cases and deaths on the W.H.O. website.

The W.H.O. update suggested that taken together, all three countries would miss the Dec. 1 target date for achieving important progress benchmarks — 70 percent isolation of patients and 70 percent of burials performed safely. Corpses of Ebola patients are extremely infectious and are an acute source of contagion.

A more optimistic take from the Associated Press:

Sierra Leone official: Ebola may have reached peak

The Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, which has been surging in recent weeks, may have reached its peak and could be on the verge of slowing down, Sierra Leone’s information minister said Wednesday.

But in a reminder of how serious the situation is in Sierra Leone, a ninth doctor became infected Wednesday and the World Health Organization said the country accounted for more than half of the new cases in the hardest-hit countries in the past week. By contrast, infections appear to be either stabilizing or declining in Guinea and Liberia, where vigorous campaigning for a Senate election this week suggests the disease might be loosening its grip.

In all, 15,935 people have been sickened with Ebola in West Africa and other places it has occasionally popped up. Of those, 5,689 have died. The case total includes 600 new cases in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone in just the past week, according to the WHO.

Another front line fighter falls ill, via the Washington Post:

9th Sierra Leonean doctor infected with Ebola

An official says a ninth Sierra Leonean doctor has been infected with Ebola, underscoring the devastating toll the disease is taking on health care workers.

Abass Kamara, a Health Ministry spokesman, said that Dr. Songo Mbriwa tested positive for Ebola on Wednesday. Mbriwa is a top military doctor and was working at the Hastings Ebola treatment center in the east end of the capital.

The disease is transmitted through contact with bodily fluids of the sick, putting health workers at particular risk and it has devastated their ranks. Nearly 600 of them have become infected in the West African outbreak, many in the hardest-hit countries.

From the Guardian, the down side of survival:

Ebola: ‘survivors are left alone to carry their pain and loneliness’

  • On the Ebola frontline: how life in rural Sierra Leone is unfolding for one community worker

Isaac Bayoh, 25, volunteers as an Ebola quarantine and awareness worker. He is part of a team that isolates the houses of those who have the disease, educates the family and neighbours, and monitors the patient’s progress. Here, in his own words sent via WhatsApp, he shares his experiences about how people and communities are affected

My story just like many has been a terrible experience, I have seen friends and loved ones taken away and never returned.

I have seen the most sorrowful reaction of people upon hearing of being positive with the Ebola virus or their family or a friend or a neighbour have tested positive. I have seen joy in a family being vanished away, I have seen things that my eyes cannot ever believe but yet they are fact, they are happening every day with people, with friends, loved ones, families and communities.

A woman tells me after being quarantined when her son died of the Ebola virus that her life has ended because her only son, who was her only support, is dead and it’s just a matter of time before her own symptoms begin to show. I can clearly see the fear in her eyes as we speak. That when I came in to give the psychological support, and because of what I told her, when her result came and it was positive, I saw that state of mind in her, that emotion. She is strong and [has] not given up. She is here today after surviving the virus, and she said one of her recovery methods was to stay positive no matter what. She never gave up.

Next, a video report from the World Health Organization:

WHO: field report from Koinadugu, Sierra Leone

Program notes:

Upon learning of the first Ebola cases reported in Koinadugu District, Sierra Leone in October 2014, the World Health Organization and partners acted swiftly to track new transmission chains, increase key resources on the ground, and establish remote community care centers where they could do the most good. With support from the government and traditional leaders, this coordinated, targeted response is beginning to show signs of bringing the localized outbreak under control.

In November 2014, WHO spokesperson Winnie Romeril joined WHO and partners on the ground and filed this video report.

After the jump, on to Liberia and the first healed patients form an American-built field hospital, a fatal forgery brings death to eight, a presidential appointee rejected, a Chinese hospital makes a good presidential impression, a warning about lethal semen, and a clean water NGO tackles a new task, plus school sanitation worries in post-Ebola Nigeria. . . Continue reading

California drought unchanged: Sorry, folks


Yep, the latest map from the U.S. Drought Monitor [released a day early because of the holiday] shows no change in the parched state of the Golden State despite the recent rains. Click on it to embiggen:

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And whilst on the subject of that holiday, mull this from Los Angeles Times editorial cartoonist David Horsey:

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