Category Archives: Geopolitics

Headlines II: Spies, pols, threats, hacks, zones,


Lotsa ground to cover, so straight ahead, first with the Washington Times:

Greenwald to publish list of U.S. citizens NSA spied on

Glenn Greenwald, one of the reporters who chronicled the document dump by National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden via the U.K. press, now said he’s set to publish his most dramatic piece yet: The names of those in the United States targeted by the NSA.

“One of the big questions when is comes to domestic spying is, ‘Who have been the NSA’s specific targets?’ Are they political critics and dissidents and activists? Are they genuinely people we’d regard as terrorists? What are the metrics and calculations that go into choosing those targets and what is done with the surveillance that is conducted? Those are the kinds of questions that I want to still answer,” Mr. Greenwald told The Sunday Times of London.

And a video report from RT America:

Greenwald to reveal Americans targeted by NSA

Program Notes:

Journalist Glenn Greenwald will end his National Security Agency series by revealing the names of American citizens targeted for surveillance by the agency. Documents provided to Greenwald by whistleblower Edward Snowden have been central to his series, revealing the massive extent of the government’s surveillance on international and domestic populations. The journalist promises his last reveal will be similar to a fireworks display; the best and most impressive portion of the show is the finale. RT’s Ameera David has more information on the tantalizing tease by Greenwald.

From the McClatchy Washington Bureau, there’s a deeper story here:

Spy whistleblower advocate stays put

Less than two months ago, a high-profile government whistleblower advocate found himself under scrutiny — ironically in an investigation of an alleged leak to Congress.

The Pentagon’s inspector general was trying to suspend and possibly revoke the top secret access of Dan Meyer, that office’s former director of whistleblowing. At the time, the news triggered concerns in Congress that he was being retaliated against for doing his job. But Meyer, who is now executive director for intelligence community whistleblowing, doesn’t appear to be going anywhere.

Although he won’t comment on the specifics, he did say his security badge “had been restored.” Asked if he had any concerns about his future, he was cryptic, but upbeat. “I have been treated very well by the intelligence community,” he said.

From NBC News, both spook and eavesdropper:

Edward Snowden Tells Brian Williams: ‘I Was Trained as a Spy’

Edward Snowden, in an exclusive interview with “Nightly News” anchor Brian Williams, is fighting back against critics who dismissed him as a low-level hacker — saying he was “trained as a spy” and offered technical expertise to high levels of government.

Snowden defended his expertise in portions of the interview that aired at 6:30 p.m. ET on Nightly News. The extended, wide-ranging interview with Williams, his first with a U.S. television network, airs Wednesday at 10 p.m. ET on NBC.

“I was trained as a spy in sort of the traditional sense of the word, in that I lived and worked undercover overseas — pretending to work in a job that I’m not — and even being assigned a name that was not mine,” Snowden said in the interview.

From New Europe, politically inconvenient:

Austria constant partner of NSA: journalist

American journalist Glenn Greenwald has said in an interview with newspaper Der Standard on Monday that Austria “constantly” works together with the American National Security Agency (NSA).

This came despite recent claims from Austrian Minister for Defence Gerald Klug that the two work together only “occasionally.”

The confidant for NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden said the cooperation is discreet and aimed at specific goals, though added the NSA sees countries such as Austria — which it puts in a “Tier B” category — primarily as a monitoring target, and as a partner “only secondarily.”

He said further documents on the cooperation between Austria and the NSA would “probably” be released as he understood the Austrian public is interested in the information, and added that “we” are currently deciding the best way to distribute the documents amongst journalists to speed up their reporting.

From intelNews.org, raising curious questions:

Alleged CIA spy seeks retrial after Iranian court slashes his sentence

A United States citizen held in Iran since 2011 on spy charges has appealed for a retrial after an Iranian court quashed his earlier death sentence for espionage. Amir Mirzaei Hekmati, a former Marine born in the US state of Arizona, was arrested in August of 2011 in Iran and charged with carrying out a covert mission for the Central Intelligence Agency.

In December of 2011, Hekmati appeared on Iranian state television and acknowledged that he was an operative of the CIA. He said in an interview that he had been trained “in languages and espionage” while in the US Army and that, in 2009, after nearly a decade of intelligence training, he was recruited by the CIA and specifically prepared to carry out what intelligence operatives sometimes refer to as a ‘dangling operation’ in Iran.

The aim of the mission, said Hekmati, was to travel to Tehran, contact Iran’s Ministry of Intelligence and National Security, and pose as a genuine American defector wishing to supply the Iranians with inside information about American intelligence. His immediate task was to gain the trust of Iranian authorities by giving them some correct information in order to set the stage for a longer campaign of disinformation aimed at undermining a host of Iranian intelligence operations.

From the New York Times, street level spookery:

In Complaint, Activists Seek Audit of New York Police Surveillance

Several groups plan to file a formal complaint on Tuesday seeking an audit of the New York Police Department’s intelligence gathering operations, after recent revelations that the department had been monitoring political activists, sending undercover officers to their meetings and filing reports on their plans.

The groups said the complaint would be the first over surveillance to be filed with the department’s new office of inspector general; it is likely be a closely watched test for the office, whose duty is to oversee the tactics and the policies of the police.

The City Council, despite opposition from former Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, created the office last year after complaints about the overuse of stop-and-frisk tactics and surveillance of Muslim communities.

From Homeland Security News Wire, repudiating another form of domestic “security”:

U.S. recalibrating Secure Communities

As more and more municipalities across the country refuse to hold undocumented immigrants in jail on behalf of DHS’ Secure Communities program, President Barack Obama is adopting a strategy to limit deportations to undocumented immigrants who have been convicted of violent crimes. The new strategy would help relieve political pressure on the White House as immigrant rights activists continue to label Obama as the “deporter in chief” for his administration’s aggressive enforcement of immigration laws.

Secure Communities began under the George W. Bush administration to coordinate enforcement of federal immigration laws with local communities. The FBI collects the fingerprints of individuals arrested by local and state police, to identify fugitives or individuals wanted in other jurisdictions. With Secure Communities, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials review the fingerprints against immigration databases to see whther arrested individuals are deportable.

Secure Communities requires that local law enforcement agencies hold detainees until an ICE agent arrives, but police chiefs say that the law has made undocumented immigrants less likely to report crimes when they have been victims or witnesses. “The immigrant community are the prey; they are not the predators,” said Ron Teachman, chief of police in South Bend, Indiana. “We need them to be the eyes and ears. They are exploited in their workplace, in their neighborhoods and in their own homes with domestic violence.”

From the Guardian, revelations assessed:

Privacy under attack: the NSA files revealed new threats to democracy

Thanks to Edward Snowden, we know the apparatus of repression has been covertly attached to the democratic state. However, our struggle to retain privacy is far from hopeless

The 20th-century question was how many targets could be simultaneously followed in a world where each of them required hack, tap, steal. But we then started to build a new form of human communication. From the moment we created the internet, two of the basic assumptions began to fail: the simplicity of “one target, one circuit” went away, and the difference between home and abroad vanished too.

That distinction vanished in the United States because so much of the network and associated services, for better and worse, resided there. The question “Do we listen inside our borders?” was seemingly reduced to “Are we going to listen at all?”

At this point, a vastly imprudent US administration intervened. Their defining characteristic was that they didn’t think long before acting. Presented with a national calamity that also constituted a political opportunity, nothing stood between them and all the mistakes that haste can make for their children’s children to repent at leisure. What they did – in secret, with the assistance of judges appointed by a single man operating in secrecy, and with the connivance of many decent people who believed themselves to be acting to save the society – was to unchain the listeners from law.

And from RT, a curious blacklisting:

Snowden, Greenwald, Appelbaum, WikiLeaks ‘blacklisted’ from Stockholm Internet Forum

Key digital rights activists – including Edward Snowden and hacker Jacob Appelbaum – have been blacklisted from the Stockholm Internet Forum (SIF) on internet openness and freedom. The move has caused a stir at the gathering and outraged Twitter users.

The third annual European meeting of internet activists kicked off in Sweden on May 26, with its main theme being “Internet– privacy, transparency, surveillance and control.”

But strangely enough, those whose names immediately spring to mind when it comes to the issue of surveillance are not allowed to attend the event.

And a video report from RT, focusing on the waffling of program organizations when put to the question:

Where’s Ed? Stockholm web summit slammed as Snowden, Greenwald ‘blacklisted’

Program note:

Blacklisting Edward Snowden, Glenn Greenwald, hacker Jacob Appelbaum and others by the Stockholm Internet Forum (SIF) on internet freedom provoked strong criticism from participants and outrage on Twitter.

From the New York Times, rewards for switching sides:

Hacker Who Helped Disrupt Cyberattacks Is Allowed to Walk Free

The New York man who helped the authorities infiltrate the shadowy world of computer hacking and disrupt at least 300 cyberattacks on targets that included the United States military, courts and private companies was given a greatly reduced sentence on Tuesday of time served, and was allowed to walk free.

Federal prosecutors had sought leniency for the hacker, Hector Xavier Monsegur, citing what they called his “extraordinary cooperation” in helping the Federal Bureau of Investigation take down an aggressive group of hackers who were part of the collective Anonymous, of which he was a member, and its splinter groups, which had taken credit for attacking government and corporate websites.

Mr. Monsegur’s information, the authorities said, led to the arrest of eight “major co-conspirators,” including Jeremy Hammond, whom the F.B.I. had called its top “cybercriminal target” and who was sentenced to 10 years in prison in November.

The Washington Post covers an equally spooky form of everyday espionage:

Brokers use ‘billions’ of data points to profile Americans

Are you a financially strapped working mother who smokes? A Jewish retiree with a fondness for Caribbean cruises? Or a Spanish-speaking professional with allergies, a dog and a collection of Elvis memorabilia?

All this information and much, much more is being quietly collected, analyzed and distributed by the nation’s burgeoning data broker industry, which uses billions of individual data points to produce detailed portraits of virtually every American consumer, the Federal Trade Commission reported Tuesday.

The FTC report provided an unusually detailed account of the system of commercial surveillance that draws on government records, shopping habits and social media postings to help marketers hone their advertising pitches. Officials said the intimacy of these profiles would unnerve some consumers who have little ability to track what’s being collected or how it’s used — or even to correct false information. The FTC called for legislation to bring transparency to the multi-billion-dollar industry and give consumers some control over how their data is used.

From the New York Times, caught in the crossfire:

Technology Companies Are Pressing Congress to Bolster Privacy Protections

A law that allows the government to read email and cloud-stored data over six months old without a search warrant is under attack from technology companies, trade associations and lobbying groups, which are pressing Congress to tighten privacy protections. Federal investigators have used the law to view content hosted by third-party providers for civil and criminal lawsuits, in some cases without giving notice to the individual being investigated.

Nearly 30 years after Congress passed the law, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, which government officials have interpreted to cover newer technologies, cloud computing companies are scrambling to reassure their customers, and some clients are taking their business to other countries.

Ben Young, the general counsel for Peer 1, a web hosting company based in Vancouver, British Columbia, said his customers were keeping their business out of the United States because the country “has a serious branding problem.”

Defense One asks for spare change:

Are Paychecks the Problem? Senate Considers Bonuses for Pentagon’s Cyber Workforce

Current and aspiring Defense Department personnel with cyber skills could see a boost in pay under a Senate 2015 defense policy bill that lawmakers detailed on Friday.

Defense is up against the private sector’s lucrative salaries as it endeavors to boost cyber mission forces. Pentagon Secretary Chuck Hagel recently said these forces, expected to include 1,800 personnel by year’s end, should number 6,000 professionals in 2016.

The Senate Armed Services Committee on Thursday approved a measure that directs each military service to determine “whether recruiting, retention, and assignment of service members with cyber skills requires bonuses or special and incentive pays,” according to the new details. The services would have to report their decisions to Congress by Jan. 31, 2015.

BBC News hacks you pocket pal:

Apple devices ‘hijacked for ransom’ in Australia

Several users of Apple devices in Australia have reported that their gadgets have been “hijacked” – with a message demanding money.

Experts believed the hack had targeted users by exploiting the Find my iPhone feature.

A message appeared on some targeted phones asking for “$100 USD/EUR” to be sent to a PayPal account.

Mobile networks have advised affected users to contact Apple, which has not yet commented on the problem.

And it’s not just Down Under, as the London Telegraph reports:

iPhones frozen by hackers demanding ransom

  • People around the world have found their iPads and iPhones frozen by hackers who are demanding cash ransoms to unlock their devices

Owners of iPhones and iPads have been targeted by a hacker who is freezing iOS devices and demanding a ransom of up to £55 to unlock them.

The majority of the attacks have taken place in Australia although there are also reports of Britons being affected.

It appears that the hacker, who goes by the name Oleg Pliss, has managed to exploit the Find My iPhone feature which can track and remotely lock stolen devices.

Reuters covers another hack attack:

Spotify to ask users to re-enter passwords after cyberattack

Music streaming service Spotify AB will ask some of its 40 million users to re-enter their passwords and upgrade their software in coming days after detecting unauthorized access to its internal systems and data.

Chief Technology Officer Oskar Stal said in a blogpost on Tuesday that it has found evidence of attackers accessing just one user’s data, which did not include payment or password information. But as a precaution, it intends to ask “certain Spotify users” to re-enter their log-in credentials, and upgrade their Google (GOOGL.O) Android app.

Spotify said it is not recommending any action yet for users of Apple Inc (AAPL.O) iPhones or devices based on Microsoft’s (MSFT.O) Windows.

From CBC News, a spy in the bedroom, and for a good cause:

Spy cam nabs care worker stealing from 82-year-old Winnipegger

  • ‘What you did is despicable,’ Manitoba judge says in giving thief 2 years probation, community work

Viola Dufresne said she noticed money vanishing from her wallet starting last January, totalling nearly $1,100 over six months.

“My dad taught us morals, and all of a sudden I’m in my home and somebody rips me off. It made me mad,” she told CBC News on Monday.

Winnipeg police told Dufresne there wasn’t much they could do without evidence, so she went online and bought a spy camera. The camera, which resembles a clock radio, showed the home-care aide taking $25 from Dufresne’s wallet.

Techdirt laments:

Former CIA Director And Defense Secretary Says CIA Tried, But Failed, To Do Economic Espionage

  • from the this-doesn’t-make-the-us-look-any-better dept

US intelligence officials still seem to think that there’s some big distinction between the kind of intelligence work the US does versus the kind that other countries do. US officials time and time again claim that they don’t do “economic espionage” — even though it’s pretty clear that they do it, just through indirect means (i.e., while they don’t hand trade secrets over to companies, they’re certainly using economic information to impact policy and trade discussions).

Former Defense Secretary and CIA boss Robert Gates continued this sort of tone deaf line of thinking from US intelligence defenders by claiming that French intelligence downloads the contents of laptops from businessmen visiting Paris:

“There are probably a dozen or 15 countries that steal our technology in this way,” Gates said in an interview the Council on Foreign Relations posted online Thursday. “In terms of the most capable, next to the Chinese, are the French — and they’ve been doing it a long time.”

After the jump, the latest developments in the ongoing, ever-transforming Asian Game of Zones, including the latest American plans for Afghanistan, Sino-American cyberwar gambits, allegations of ramming, corporate targeting, the relentless push for Japanese militarization, and Pyongyang blusters belicosely. . . Continue reading

Headlines II: Spies, laws, pols, zones, drones


For today’s tales from the dark side, we begin with this from MintPress News:

Will The House’s Gutted USA Freedom Act Really Stop The NSA?

“While it represents a slight improvement from the status quo, it isn’t the reform bill that Americans deserve,” says a staff attorney with the ACLU.

In a Thursday op-ed for Hays Post, Kansas Rep. Tim Huelskamp explained his reasoning for not voting for the USA Freedom Act, which cleared the House earlier in the day in a 303-121 vote.

“[The] bill presented on the House floor today does not address many of privacy and constitutional concerns expressed by Kansans over the warrantless bulk collection of Americans’ personal information,” wrote Huelskamp.

Huelskamp was an original sponsor to the bill. Originally meant to end the National Security Agency’s bulk collection of metadata from Americans’ phone records, the bill was initially heralded as the first serious attempt to bring balance to the way the nation handles electronic surveillance.

From the Guardian, the obvious conclusion:

The year of living more dangerously: Obama’s drone speech was a sham

  • We were promised drone memos. And a case for legal targeted killing. And no more Gitmo. We’re still waiting

Twelve months ago today, Barack Obama gave a landmark national security speech in which he frankly acknowledged that the United States had at least in some cases compromised its values in the years since 9/11 – and offered his vision of a US national security policy more directly in line with “the freedoms and ideals that we defend.” It was widely praised as “a momentous turning point in post-9/11 America”.

Addressing an audience at the National Defense University (NDU) in Washington, the president pledged greater transparency about targeted killings, rededicated himself to closing the detention center at Guantánamo Bay and urged Congress to refine and ultimately repeal the Authorization for the Use of Military Force, which has been invoked to justify everything from military detention to drones strikes.

A year later, none of these promises have been met. Instead, drone strikes have continue (and likely killed and wounded civilians), 154 men remain detained at Guantanamo and the administration has taken no steps to roll back the AUMF. This is not the sort of change Obama promised.

Coming up with a drone report the old-fashioned way with RT:

Over 60% of US drone targets in Pakistan are homes – research

The CIA has been bombing Pakistan’s domestic buildings more than any other targets over the past decade of the drone war launched by the US, says the latest research by the Bureau of Investigative Journalism.

Almost two thirds, or over 60 percent, of all US drone strikes in Pakistan targeted domestic buildings, says joint research conducted by the Bureau of Investigative Journalism (BIJ), a London-based non-profit news group, along with Forensic Architecture, a research unit based at Goldsmiths University, London, and Situ Research in New York.

The authors of the paper analyzed thousands of media reports, witness testimonies and field investigations to obtain the data on drone strikes in Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas (Fata).

According to the study, at least 132 houses have been destroyed in more than 380 strikes over the past decade with at least 222 civilians being among the 1,500 or more people killed.

Security checks and no security, from Quartz:

You should fear background checks even if you’ve done nothing wrong

  • 41% error rate

This issue matters not only because innocent people and employers who hire screening companies are getting ensnared by a digital dragnet; it also matters because 65 million Americans have criminal records, and those who want to turn their lives around are hurt by background check mistakes. Maybe you don’t care that employers end up screening out deserving applicants. Maybe you scoff at liberals like me who worry that background screening has a discriminatory impact on people of color.  At least you should care that the mistakes cut both ways: employers can end up hiring applicants whose full criminal records are not showing up on background screens.

You can find a litany of common screw-ups in this report by the National Consumer Law Center (NCLC). It’s impossible to quantify the extent of the errors, partly because the industry has no registration requirements and any fly-by-night operation with web access can set up shop. But the NCLC says “tens of millions of workers may pay for these third-party errors with their jobs.” One screening company studied federal corrections databases and found a “41% error rate.”

If you got arrested 30 years ago for selling a little weed but were never charged, or if you went to trial but were never convicted, you still might be tagged with a criminal record. That’s because too many screeners don’t bother to check original court records to verify the status of cases, according to Welby. These screening companies often rely only on bulk databases that aren’t properly updated.

Techdirt covers another reason for insecurity:

Another Bogus Hit From A License Plate Reader Results In Another Citizen Surrounded By Cops With Guns Out

  • from the verification-to-be-performed-at-gunpoint dept

We recently covered a story about a lawyer who found himself approached by cops with guns drawn after an automatic license plate reader misread a single character on his plate as he drove by. The police did make an attempt to verify the plate but were stymied by heavy traffic. Unfortunately, it appears they decided to force the issue rather than let a potential car thief escape across the state line.

As I pointed out then, the increasing reliance on ALPRs, combined with the one-billion-plus records already in storage and the millions being collected every day, means the number of errors will only increase as time goes on — even as the technology continues to improve. This person was lucky to escape with nothing more than an elevated heart rate. Others won’t be so lucky… like Denise Green of San Francisco.

Green’s civil rights lawsuit has just been reinstated by Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, which overturned an earlier decision that granted summary judgment in favor of the San Francisco Police Department. The lower court found that the officers had made a “good faith, reasonable mistake” when they performed a felony stop of Green, which included being ordered out of her vehicle and onto the ground at gunpoint and held in cuffs for nearly 20 minutes while officers verified the plates and filled out paperwork.

From the Christian Science Monitor, righting wrongs:

Dallas targets wrongful convictions, and revolution starts to spread

The Conviction Integrity Unit formed in Dallas to correct wrongful convictions has become a national model that is slowly changing prosecutors’ willingness to reopen the books nationwide.

Some of these units are window dressing created mostly for public relations, critics say. But the Dallas CI Unit has had a profound impact in the city and has come at a time when concerns about wrongful convictions are rippling through the American justice system.

Indeed, as exonerations nationwide force prosecutors to reconsider their role in public safety, Mr. Watkins has cast himself as a leading reformer, taking on the insular culture within district attorneys’ offices and challenging the credo that the most effective district attorney is the one who wins the most convictions.

“One overriding truth is that the prosecutor is by far the most important and powerful actor in the criminal justice system,” says Samuel Gross, editor of the National Registry of Exonerations.

RT covers a curious possibility:

Snowden ‘considers’ returning to US – report

American whistleblower Edward Snowden is “considering” returning home to the USA under certain conditions, his lawyer told German news magazine Der Spiegel.

“There are negotiations,” Snowden’s German lawyer Wolfgang Kaleck told Der Spiegel. “Those who know the case are aware that an amicable agreement with the US authorities will be most reasonable.”

All efforts are now focused on finding a solution acceptable for Edward Snowden, at least in the medium term, according to Kaleck, who is also secretary-general for the European Center for Constitutional and Human Rights.

From Medill News Service, snitchin’ in the kitchen?:

With ‘Internet of Things,’ your fridge will know when milk is low

Americans are adapting to a world in which virtually everything _ from cellphones and cars to washing machines and refrigerators _ is going to be connected to the Internet or networks. Many of these devices will _ and do _ “talk” to one another via tiny sensors that function almost like human senses, logging information such as temperature, light, motion and sound.

Theoretically, the sensors could allow a new refrigerator, for example, to send an alert to a homeowner’s smartphone whenever the fridge is running low on milk. This concept of device conversation is known as the Internet of Things. The technology will make life easier, but it also means more people are vulnerable to device malfunction or hacking.

Experts and government officials acknowledge the transformative power of the Internet of Things. But the authors of a White House report in May on the effects of big data _ including all the information that devices collect _ are also concerned about the potential for privacy abuses that comes with the technology.

Getting censorious with the New York Times:

Twitter Agrees to Block ‘Blasphemous’ Tweets in Pakistan

At least five times this month, a Pakistani bureaucrat who works from a colonial-era barracks in Karachi, just down the street from the former home of his country’s secularist founder, Mohammed Ali Jinnah, asked Twitter to shield his compatriots from exposure to accounts, tweets or searches of the social network that he described as “blasphemous” or “unethical.”

All five of those requests were honored by the company, meaning that Twitter users in Pakistan can no longer see the content that so disturbed the bureaucrat, Abdul Batin of the Pakistan Telecommunications Authority: crude drawings of the Prophet Muhammad, photographs of burning Qurans, and messages from a handful of anti-Islam bloggers and an American porn star who now attends Duke University.

The blocking of these tweets in Pakistan — in line with the country-specific censorship policy Twitter unveiled in 2012 — is the first time the social network has agreed to withhold content there. A number of the accounts seemed to have been blocked in anticipation of the fourth annual “Everybody Draw Muhammad Day” on May 20.

Digital Alzheimer’s from the Associated Press:

Europe’s move to rein in Google would stall in US

Europe’s moves to rein in Google — including a court ruling this month ordering the search giant to give people a say in what pops up when someone searches their name — may be seen in Brussels as striking a blow for the little guy.

But across the Atlantic, the idea that users should be able to edit Google search results in the name of privacy is being slammed as weird and difficult to enforce at best and a crackdown on free speech at worst.

“Americans will find their searches bowdlerized by prissy European sensibilities,” said Stewart Baker, former assistant secretary for policy at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. “We’ll be the big losers. The big winners will be French ministers who want the right to have their last mistress forgotten.”

Mountain View, California -based Google says it’s still figuring out how to comply with the European Court of Justice’s May 13 ruling, which says the company must respond to complaints about private information that turns up in searches. Google must then decide whether the public’s right to be able to find the information outweighs an individual’s right to control it — with preference given to the individual.

After the jump, the latest developments from the Asian Game of Zones, including Chinese strategy, bonding afloat with Moscow and Beijing, playing chicken over the China Seas, nukes afloat, Chinese domestic insecurity, and Japan’s relentless remilitarization push. . . Continue reading

Headlines II: Spies, hacks, zones, militarism


The latest tales from the dark side covers everything from deceptive legislation in Washington to the Games of Zones in Asia, plus lots more sandwiched in between.

First up, from MintPress News, listing the veil at an American concentration camp:

Judge Orders Release Of Guantanamo Force-Feeding Videos

  • For Guantanamo detainees, their last bargaining chip is the U.S. government’s determination to keep them alive. But their hunger strikes come at a cruel, painful cost: force-feeding.

U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler has lifted the temporary restraining order which blocked federal officials from force-feeding Mohammed Abu Wa’el Dhiab.

“Thanks to the intransigence of the Department of Defense, Mr. Dhiab may well suffer unnecessary pain from certain enteral feeding practices and forcible cell extractions,” wrote Kessler. “However, the court simply cannot let Mr. Dhiab die.”

Dhiab has indicated that he would submit to being force-fed by tube if it was done at a hospital at Guantanamo Bay, adding that he wished to “be spared the agony of having the feeding tubes inserted and removed for each feeding, and…the pain and discomfort of the restraint chair.”

According to Kessler, the Department of Defense has declined this request.

Al Jazeera America lifts another veil ever so slightly:

The unexpected way Congress is making the drone program more transparent

  • The confirmation process for Obama nominees has turned up some of the only disclosures about the US drone program

The Senate confirmed David Jeremiah Barron to the 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Thursday, but only after Barack Obama’s administration agreed to make public a controversial secret memo about the U.S. targeted killing program it has long sought to keep secret.

The administration’s decision is a revealing look at how nomination hearings have become an effective new weapon in the fight for more transparency in the government’s covert counterterrorism policies.

Though the president nominated the Harvard Law professor in September, several influential senators from both sides of the aisle — including Mark Udall of Colorado and Ron Wyden of Oregon — threatened to block the nomination unless key memos written by Barron while he was acting head of the Office of Legal Counsel in 2009 and 2010 were disclosed.

From The Hill, belated gumption:

Tech companies: FBI ‘gag orders’ violate Constitution

  • Four tech companies claim that the FBI is ignoring their First Amendment rights by barring them from revealing what types of information they turn over to the government

In court documents unsealed on Friday, Google, Yahoo, Microsoft and Facebook claimed that the national security letter (NSL) orders are a “prohibition on speech [that] violates the First Amendment.”

“The government has sought to participate in public debate over its use of the NSL statute,” the companies wrote in a friend-of-the-court brief. “It should not be permitted to gag those best suited to offer an informed viewpoint in that debate; the parties that have received NSLs.”

The FBI uses the letters to get information from banks, Web companies and others about their customers. Under the terms of the letters, though, companies are prevented from disclosing details about having received the request and handed over information.

Al Jazeera America covers a half-measure:

Anti-spy phone firm gets major funding boost

  • Silent Circle’s Blackphone received $30 million this week and is slated to ship this summer

The smartphone encryption startup Silent Circle announced a boost in funding Wednesday, grabbing $30 million in investment capital ahead of the June shipping of its signature Blackphone, which the company says can deflect cybersnooping.

The announcement came a day before the House of Representatives on Thursday approved a bill that would end mass spying by the National Security Agency (NSA). It also comes in the wake of charges against more than 100 people announced this week for unleashing a sophisticated malware that has infected half a million computers in more than 100 countries.

Silent Circle’s founder, however, warned that Blackphone still wouldn’t deter the most determined efforts of the National Security Agency to monitor mobile phones.

From China Daily, corporate blowback from NSA spooks:

Cisco weighs in on new Chinese cyber security policy

Cisco Systems Inc said it will take “active measures” to safeguard product safety and reliability after a Chinese government announcement to impose tighter cyber security checks on overseas information technology providers.

The California-based IT firm was the first overseas company to directly respond to a government decision that IT products, services and suppliers related to national security and key public interest should submit to a review program before being put into use.

Cisco is planning to work with the US government and industry contacts to learn more about the new regulation and any implications for IT companies in China, the company said in an e-mail reply to China Daily.

From the Guardian, muzzling the inconvenient press:

Scotusblog loss of Senate press credentials fuels media uproar

  • Website to mount appeal of press gallery decision on Friday
  • Legendary reporter Lyle Denniston may be affected

It is widely praised for doing what no other news organisation can. But now Scotusblog may lose what hundreds of other publications take for granted: access to the Senate.

Scotusblog, a website dedicated to coverage of the US supreme court, is preparing to mount an appeal Friday morning to a decision last month by the Senate press gallery not to renew its press credentials. The gallery granted Scotusblog credentials in 2013.

The blog’s reporters appear likely to retain access to the supreme court through temporary arrangements. The court has traditionally honored Senate credentials but is currently reviewing its press procedures.

The London Daily Mail, crusading Pee Tardies:

Three more Tea Party activists arrested over photo taken of Mississippi Senator Thad Cochran’s ailing wife in a nursing home

  • Mark Mayfield, a Tea Party board member, school teacher Richard Sager and John Mary were arrested Thursday
  • The activists were hoping to use the picture of Rose Cochran in an ad claiming Thad Cochran is having an affair
  • Mrs Cochran has been suffering from dementia for 13 years and is in hospice care
  • The men were hoping to support the campaign of Tea Party challenger Chris McDaniel

International Business Times covers the latest vileness from a household name:

Facebook Microphone Update: Electronic Surveillance Experts React To Smartphone Mic Data Collection

  • Digital Privacy Experts React To Facebook’s Intentions To Collect Data Through Smartphone Mics

On Thursday, the International Business Times reported that Facebook will use a forthcoming mobile app update to save and collect data captured by your smartphone’s microphones–a development that privacy experts found worrisome.

Though Facebook guaranteed users that “no sound is stored” by the new feature, the social media giant confirmed to the IBTimes that “data is saved, but all data is anonymized and aggregated.”

The social networking company declined to comment on how it planned to use the data once they were gleaned.

A hack attack from TechWeekEurope:

Pro-Russian Hackers Attack Central Election Commission Of Ukraine

  • CyberBerkut steals a huge archive of emails three days before the elections, sends it to the media agencies

Ukrainian hacker outfit CyberBerkut, which was previously spotted defacing at least 40 local media websites and carrying out a DDoS attack against NATO infrastructure, has struck again.

This time, the group has managed to break into the systems of the Central Election Commission (CEC) of Ukraine – an independent body of the Ukrainian government. The hackers have stolen large archive of emails, as well as the technical documentation of the CEC system administrators.

They refer to the current government of the country as a “junta” – a word which describes the ruling council of a military dictatorship.

After the jump, it’s on to Asia and the last chapter in the Games of Zones, including an Iranian stand-down, Sino-Russian exercises afloat, Japanese remilitarization, and more. . . Continue reading

Headlines II: Spooks, pols, laws, hacks, & zones


Today’s tales form the dark side covers a lot of ground, with a lot of domestic developments, new NSA questions, and much more — including the latest developments in the ongoing every-shifting Asian Game of Zones, including the Washington-pushed remilitarization of Japan.

We begin with an item sure to make you feel more secure. From the Associated Press:

AP Exclusive: Botched nuclear silo drill revealed

An Air Force security team’s botched response to a simulated assault on a nuclear missile silo has prompted a blistering review followed by expanded training to deal with the nightmare scenario of a real attack.

The Air Force recognized the possibility of such an intrusion as more worrisome after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. But an internal review of the exercise held last summer at Malmstrom Air Force Base in Montana said the security forces were unable to speedily regain control of the captured silo, and called this a “critical deficiency.”

The Associated Press obtained a copy of the report through a Freedom of Information Act request.

Next up, a looming conflict of interests from the McClatchy Washington Bureau:

CIA secrecy over detention program threatens 9/11 prosecutions, senators warned Obama

Two powerful Senate committee chairs told President Barack Obama earlier this year that the CIA’s insistence on keeping secret how it treated prisoners under its enhanced interrogation program threatens the country’s ability to bring to justice the perpetrators of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

Sens. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., chair of the Intelligence Committee, and Carl Levin, D-Mich., head of the Armed Services Committee, sought the president’s help in getting information declassified about the CIA’s so-called harsh interrogation techniques and stressed the need for transparency on a program that essentially had ended in 2006 and that Obama formally killed when he took office in 2009.

The two senators blamed the CIA’s obsession with hiding the details of the program for the logjammed military commission process that has yet to try any of the alleged 9/11 conspirators, some of whom have been in custody for nearly a dozen years.

And about those detentions. . . From the Guardian:

Guantánamo inmate vomited blood after force-feeding, documents show

  • Ahmed Rabbani held without charge for more than 10 years
  • New filing details force-feeding regime in hunger strike

New documents filed in a federal court in Washington have revealed that a Guantánamo Bay detainee contracted a chest infection as a result of force-feeding, leading him to repeatedly vomit blood.

The filing on Thursday came a day after a federal court forced the government to reveal that it has secretly recorded dozens of force-feedings of one hunger-striking Guantánamo detainee, raising the possibility that the US military may have similar films of other detainees.

The fresh documents, filed in the US district court for the District of Columbia, relate to a detainee named Ahmed Rabbani, a Pakistani father of three who has been held without charge for more than a decade.

On to NSAgate, starting with an alarmist assessment, via the Guardian:

Pentagon report: scope of intelligence compromised by Snowden ‘staggering’

  • Classified assessment describes impact of leaks as ‘grave’
  • Report does not include specific detail to support conclusions
  • 12 of 39 heavily redacted pages released after Foia request

A top-secret Pentagon report to assess the damage to national security from the leak of classified National Security Agency documents by Edward Snowden concluded that “the scope of the compromised knowledge related to US intelligence capabilities is staggering”.

The Guardian has obtained a copy of the Defense Intelligence Agency’s classified damage assessment in response to a Freedom of Information Act (Foia) lawsuit filed against the Defense Department earlier this year. The heavily redacted 39-page report was prepared in December and is titled “DoD Information Review Task Force-2: Initial Assessment, Impacts Resulting from the Compromise of Classified Material by a Former NSA Contractor.”

But while the DIA report describes the damage to US intelligence capabilities as “grave”, the government still refuses to release any specific details to support this conclusion. The entire impact assessment was redacted from the material released to the Guardian under a presidential order that protects classified information and several other Foia exemptions.

From the Guardian, when “victory” proves largely ornamental:

NSA reform bill loses backing from privacy advocates after major revisions

  • Facebook, Google and others warn of ‘unacceptable loopholes’
  • Bill’s passage expected in House even after 11th-hour changes

A landmark surveillance bill, likely to pass the US House of Representatives on Thursday, is hemorrhaging support from the civil libertarians and privacy advocates who were its champions from the start.

Major revisions to the USA Freedom Act have stripped away privacy protections and transparency requirements while expanding the potential pool of data the National Security Agency can collect, all in a bill cast as banning bulk collection of domestic phone records. As the bill nears a vote on the House floor, expected Thursday, there has been a wave of denunciations.

“It does not deserve the name ‘USA Freedom Act’ any more than the ‘Patriot Act’ merits its moniker,” wrote four former NSA whistleblowers and their old ally on the House intelligence committee staff.

More from the McClatchy Washington Bureau:

Wyden opposes House USA Freedom Act, says it’s “watered down”

The USA Freedom Act may change the federal government’s bulk data collection system, but Sen. Ron Wyden, a leader critic of surveillance policy, sees the measure as “watered down.”

Wyden, D-Ore., issued a stinging statement Friday as the House passed the act, 303 to 121.

“I am gravely concerned that the changes that have been made to the House version of this bill have watered it down so far that it fails to protect Americans from suspicionless mass surveillance,” he said.

Wyden noted that the new text says the government has to use a “selection term” to collect Americans’ records, but the bill’s definition of such terms is too vague–and, Wyden said, “could be used to collect all of the phone records in a particular area code, or all of the credit card records from a particular state.”

Still more from Wired threat level:

NSA Reform Bill Passes the House—With a Gaping Loophole

The U.S. House of Representatives has passed a bill that would end the NSA’s mass collection of Americans’ phone records. Unfortunately, it may not end the NSA’s mass collection of Americans’ phone records.

The House voted 303 to 121 Thursday in favor of the USA Freedom Act, broad legislation aimed at reforming the NSA’s surveillance powers exposed by Edward Snowden. The central provision of the bill, which now moves on to debate in the Senate, is intended to limit what the intelligence community calls “bulk” collection–the indiscriminate vacuuming up of citizen’s phone and internet records. But privacy advocates and civil libertarians say last-minute changes to the legislation supported by the White House added ambiguous language that could essentially give the NSA a generous loophole through which it can continue its massive domestic data collection.

In the House’s final version of the bill, the NSA would be stripped of the power to collect all Americans’ phone records for metadata analysis, a practice revealed in the first Guardian story about Snowden’s leaks published last year. It instead would be required to limit its collection to specific terms. The problem is that those terms may not be nearly specific enough, and could still include massive lists of target phone numbers or entire ranges of IP addresses.

And the latest shot from Snowden’s cache via RT:

NSA spies on OSCE HQ in Vienna – report

Among the many targets for the UN National Security Agency’s electronic surveillance is the Vienna-based headquarters of the Organization of Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), Austrian media reported.

The OSCE is mentioned among the targets for NSA in the National Intelligence Priorities Framework (NIPF), a confidential document outlining intelligence gathering priorities, reported on Wednesday Austrian newspaper Die Presse. It cites German journalist Holger Stark with Der Spiegel magazine, who has access to NSA documents leaked by Edward Snowden.

The NIPF update from April 9, 2013, lists OSCE’s foreign policy as a Level 4 point of interest for the US and its involvement in arms trade control as a Level 3 point of interest, Stark told the newspaper. Level 3 information is considered important enough by the US intelligence community to make its way to the US secretaries of defense and state, he added.

More from TheLocal.at:

NSA ‘spying on OSCE and IAEA’ in Vienna

The US National Security Agency (NSA) has reportedly bugged the Vienna-based OSCE (Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe), according to Germany’s Spiegel magazine.

Spiegel reporter and NSA expert Holgar Stark said it was highly likely that the IAEA headquarters in Vienna, as well as the Russian, Iranian and North Korean embassies in the Austrian capital, were bugged as well.

The “foreign policy goals” of the OSCE are of particular interest to the NSA, the Austrian daily Presse said.

The current crisis in Ukraine has revived the prominence of the OSCE – previously it became important as a connection between the east and west during the Cold War.

A trip through the NSA hackery from TheLocal.de:

How the NSA may have tapped Merkel’s phone

German security services have come up with five different ways the US National Security Agency (NSA) may have succeeded in spying on Chancellor Angela Merkel’s mobile phone, a leaked report revealed on Thursday.

The seven-page secret report by the Federal Office for Information Security (BSI), seen by Bild newspaper, discusses five possible ways the NSA could have gained access to Merkel’s phone. The story caused outrage in Germany when it came to light in October last year.

Possibilities considered most likely were that US agents either used “passive receiving antenna” planted in central Berlin or else intercepted Merkel’s communications as they were transmitted through undersea cables.

The first “very likely” scenario would have involved placing receiving antennas near the capital’s Reichstag parliament building and using these to listen to the Chancellor’s phone calls and read her text messages. . .

And a retraction demanded, via the Associated Press:

German university rector faults Snowden doctorate

The rector of a German university where academics voted to award NSA leaker Edward Snowden an honorary doctorate is trying to have the decision reversed — arguing that his actions don’t fulfill the required criteria.

The University of Rostock’s philosophy faculty decided by a large majority last week to award Snowden the title.

But rector Wolfgang Schareck said in a statement Thursday that Snowden’s leaking to media of NSA documents doesn’t constitute the “special academic achievement” required by law in the state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania for a doctorate to be granted.

Today’s lone drone headline, via The Hill:

Senate confirms drone memo author

The Senate narrowly voted Thursday to confirm the author of memos justfying drone strikes against U.S. citizens to a federal court.

In a 53-45 vote, the Senate confirmed David Barron to serve on the First Circuit Court of Appeals.

The successful vote came after the administration said it would make public the memos Baron authored on the drone program.

From Ars Technica, a challenge declined:

FBI withdraws national security letter following Microsoft challenge

  • Rather than litigating gag order, FBI goes directly to the customer.

The FBI withdrew a national security letter targeting an Office 365 enterprise customer following Microsoft’s challenge to a provision of the letter gagging the company from informing the target, according to court documents unsealed Thursday.

“In this case, the Letter included a nondisclosure provision and we moved forward to challenge it in court. We concluded that the nondisclosure provision was unlawful and violated our Constitutional right to free expression. It did so by hindering our practice of notifying enterprise customers when we receive legal orders related to their data,” Brad Smith, Microsoft’s general counsel wrote in a blog post Thursday.

While it’s not everyday that a company’s policy benefits the customer, the flap highlights the unsettled state of gag orders associated with national security letters. The letters, which come directly from the FBI, require entities like Internet companies, banks, or others to cough up a wealth of information to the authorities. Recipients of them are generally forbidden from disclosing them.

From RT, a de facto beginning of recriminalized debt in Old Blighty:

Brits jailed as Interpol takes ‘debt collector’ role for Gulf States – rights group

UK residents go to jail and lose jobs over unpaid loans as Interpol has started issuing ‘red notices’ – their strongest criminal alert – over unfunded checks, which are a criminal offense in states with sharia law, a rights group has found.

The Fair Trials International has labeled the International Criminal Police Organization a ‘debt collector’ for countries like Oman, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates. The UK-registered charity has stated that by this, Interpol’s services are being ‘misused’.

The rights group wrote a letter to Interpol’s Secretary General, Ronald K. Noble, urging safeguards to be put in place “so that its Red Notice system focuses on bringing serious international criminals to justice rather than wrecking the lives of normal people who have provided blank cheques as security, a common practice in a number of countries across the region,” said a statement published on the group’s website.

When photography is a crime [criminal trespass and invasion of privacy] via United Press International:

Top Mississipi Tea Party official charged in videotaping of Sen. Cochran’s wife in nursing home

  • Primary challenger says those involved in secretly videotaping Sen. Thad Cochran’s wife in a Mississippi nursing home should be prosecuted.

The vice chairman of the Mississippi Tea Party was charged Thursday with being involved in the nursing home videotaping of Sen. Thad Cochran’s wife.

Bail was set at $250,000 for Mark Mayfield. Mayfield, a lawyer, is also an official with the Central Mississippi Tea Party.

Two other men were also charged Thursday. Last week, Clayton Kelly, a right-wing blogger, was charged with entering a Madison nursing home surreptitiously and videotaping Rose Cochran.

Corporate hack generates blowback, via Sky News:

Hacked eBay Faces Multiple Investigations

  • Several inquiries have been launched in the US into the data breach, as UK authorities also consider a formal investigation.

Web retailer eBay is facing transatlantic scrutiny from the authorities over a massive cyber attack that compromised the personal data of its 145 million users.

Connecticut, Florida and Illinois have launched a joint inquiry over the hack, which came to light on Wednesday.

The investigation will focus on the scope of the data breach and eBay’s response, said Connecticut officials.

Another, even more ominous hack, via The Wire:

An American Utility’s Control System Was Hacked

This week in hacking: The control system for a U.S. public utility was compromised. The Department of Homeland Security did not specify which utility was affected in the agency’s Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT) report.

A DHS official told Reuters, “While unauthorized access was identified, ICS-CERT was able to work with the affected entity to put in place mitigation strategies and ensure the security of their control systems before there was any impact to operations.”

Details of these cyber attacks are rarely revealed to the public, and even more rarely do they provide details into the matter. What we do know: this particular attack was on a utility that was previously hacked and the hackers used the employee access portal to get in. The actual hack was relatively simple: they determined the password through a tactic known as “brute forcing.” In a brute force hack, the attackers auto generate a variety of password combinations and try them until something clicks.

And another security violation from TheLocal.de:

Officer puts neo-Nazi stickers in police van

Police in Bavaria have been forced onto the defensive after an officer stuck neo-Nazi stickers in a police van. State prosecutors are investigating a 25-year-old policeman.

An unnamed passer-by on their way to a football match on Sunday in Fürth was shocked to find several far-right stickers stuck on a box in the trunk of a USK police car – a special unit used for crowd control.

Zeit Online on its far-right watch blog, Störungsmelder, wrote on Thursday that the passer-by took a photo which then opened the police force up to a host of criticism.

The stickers, which were clearly visible through the rear window, were printed with well known far-right slogans advocating violence against anti-fascists. “Good Night Left Side” and “Organize against Antifa. Know your enemy. Name your enemy,” they read.

From the Verge, sanctions blowback hinders spy satellite programs?:

Russian rocket ban could delay US space missions for years, report says

The United States military’s space program could see more than 30 missions delayed for an average of three and a half years each if Russia follows through with its threat to ban exports of the RD-180 rocket engines used for launching satellites, according to a Pentagon report obtained by SpaceNews. The Pentagon reportedly also found that, in a worst-case scenario, the delays may cost the US as much as $5 billion. In a best-case scenario, the numbers drop to nine missions delayed by around two years each and a loss of $2.5 billion.

“The US ‘needs to develop a domestic engine’”Russia’s Deputy Prime Minister said the ban would be going into place earlier this month, but SpaceNews reports that the government is yet to see signs that it’s been put in place. While that remains the case, the Pentagon suggests accelerating the pace at which RD-180s are purchased to increase the remaining US stock. Right now, there are reportedly only 15 of the engines left between the military’s rocket contractors, United Launch Alliance and RD Amross.

The Pentagon reportedly also found that speeding up production of a US-made engine that’s in the works from United Launch Alliance would not be able to avoid the delays.

After the jump, the latest developments in Asia’s increasingly dangerous Game of Zones, starting with a major Chinese hit for American corporations as “high tech” and “spy tech” become synonymous, a Korean artillery exchange, posturing in Vietnam, Japan ups the ante, and alliances form. . . Continue reading

Headlines: Spies, pols, hacks, zones, drones


We’re reversing the normal sequence of headline posts and starting with today’s very newsy tales from the dark side, featuring major developments in Asia [after the jump], drones, the SinoAmerican EspioCyberwar, and a whole lot more.

But first, the toke’s on J. Edgar, with Fibbie pragmatism triumphant, via The Verge:

The FBI admits it might have to toke up to fight cybercrime

As the FBI looks to hire more cybersecurity agents, it’s running into a big problem: the siren song of marijuana. The FBI has a no-tolerance policy for employees using illegal drugs, but new statements by director James Comey suggest the agency is considering loosening that policy to attract employees from the cybersecurity community.

To hear Comey tell it, it’s a talent pool that’s notorious for rampant weed-smoking. “I have to hire a great work force to compete with those cybercriminals,” Comey told an audience at the New York City Bar Association, “and some of those kids want to smoke weed on the way to the interview.”

The bureau’s weed problem is particularly severe given the rise of legal marijuana use within the US, implicating many potential FBI hackers along the way. As a result, Comey said he was “grappling with the issue” of how the bureau’s policies might be amended.

From The Age, suspicions confirmed:

Assange targeted by FBI probe, US court documents reveal

WikiLeaks publisher Julian Assange remains the subject of an active criminal investigation by the United States Justice Department and Federal Bureau of Investigation, newly published court documents reveal.

Papers released in US legal proceedings have revealed that a “criminal/national security investigation” by the US Department of Justice and FBI probe of WikiLeaks is “a multi-subject investigation” that is still “active and ongoing” more than four years after the anti-secrecy website began publishing secret US diplomatic and military documents.

Confirmation that US prosecutors have not closed the book on WikiLeaks and Mr Assange comes as a consequence of litigation by the US Electronic Privacy Information Centre to enforce a freedom of information request for documents relating to the FBI’s WikiLeaks investigation.

Justice Department lawyers last month told the US District Court in Washington DC that there had been “developments in the investigation over the last year.”  In a document filed with the court on Monday, the US Government further affirmed that the “main, multi-subject, criminal investigation of the [Department of Justice] and FBI remains open and pending” making it necessary “to withhold law enforcement records related to this civilian investigation.”

There’s just no rest for the Wiki-ed, via South China Morning Post:

WikiLeaks vows to reveal second country where NSA is recording all mobile phone calls

  • WikiLeaks to name second country where the NSA is said to be recording the content of phone calls, despite warnings from Glenn Greenwald that this could “lead to deaths”

WikiLeaks has pledged to reveal the name of a second country that is having virtually all of its mobile phone calls recorded by the US National Security Agency, despite a warning that leaking the information could “lead to deaths”.

The pledge came after The Intercept revealed that the Bahamas and one other country were having most of their mobile calls recorded and stored by a powerful NSA program called SOMALGET. While the Bahamas was named, the identity of the mystery second country was kept hidden.

Greenwald, who first broke the Edward Snowden story to the world, had said on Twitter the decision not to reveal the name was made because “we were *very convinced this 1 would –> [lead to] deaths”.

Meanwhile, Truthdig raises a crucial question:

What’s the Point of a Source Protection Law That Wouldn’t Protect Chelsea Manning or Edward Snowden?

Laws are bad when they don’t do what they are meant to and even worse when they cause harm instead. The journalist-source protection law being debated by Congress—the Free Flow of Information Act (FFIA or “federal shield law”) fails in both respects. Despite being pushed by media organizations after Associated Press reporters and other journalists were served court orders last summer, it is doubtful that the proposed law will meaningfully protect anyone. Instead, it sets the stage to punish whomever the government decides are “illegitimate” journalists.

Indeed, any outlet committed to giving voice to whistle-blowers—such as The Intercept or WikiLeaks—is not considered a “covered journalist” under the measure. Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., who drafted the bill, conceded that The Intercept’s Glenn Greenwald, whose coverage of whistle-blower Snowden’s releases won a Pulitzer for The Guardian, would probably not be covered. The FFIA would fail to protect Snowden, or Manning, who provided evidence of war crimes and military cover-ups to WikiLeaks. Both sparked unprecedented public debates on government accountability and suffered the full wrath of the federal government. In other words, they are precisely the sources we need a shield law to protect.

The FFIA does not include those “whose principal function, as demonstrated by the totality of such person or entity’s work, is to publish primary source documents that have been disclosed to such person or entity without authorization.” This is colloquially called the WikiLeaks clause. But The Intercept is also in trouble owing to what its new editor-in-chief, John Cook, described in mid-April as a “commitment to continue the work of reporting on, publishing, and explicating” Snowden’s releases.

Techdirt, as usual, spots the ironic:

Keith Alexander: We Need More Spying In The Future Because All Of Our Previous Spying Has Only Increased The Number Of Terrorist Attacks

  • from the No-Such-Agency:-no-such-thing-as-‘too-much-surveillance’ dept

The New Yorker has published excerpts of a lengthy interview with retired NSA head Gen. Keith Alexander. Along with the usual defenses of the surveillance apparatus he ran for eight years (with his fiery “collect it all” attitude), Alexander makes the case for continued pervasive surveillance while admitting the last decade-plus of spying hasn’t made the US — or the world — any safer.

Al Jazeera America acts symbolically:

California bill would require judge’s warrant for government spying

  • Measure passes state Senate with just one opposing vote; proponents argue surveillance is unconstitutional

A bill in California’s state legislature would require the federal government to have a warrant from a judge if it wants state officials to cooperate when federal agencies search residents’ cellphone and computer records.

The bill, which passed the state Senate with just one opposing vote this week, was introduced in the wake of information leaked by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, revealing massive internal surveillance of U.S. citizens by the NSA.

“The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution is very clear. It says the government shall not engage in unreasonable search and seizure,” said the bill’s author, Democratic State Sen. Ted Lieu, of Torrance. “The National Security Agency’s massive and indiscriminate collecting of phone data on all Americans, including more than 38 million Californians, is a threat to our liberty and freedom.”

The bill wouldn’t bar the NSA or any other federal government agency from continuing to spy. But it would prohibit the state from participating in that surveillance or providing material support to the agencies involved.

And on to that conveniently timed [for Washington] SinoCyberwar, first from Global Times:

China summons US ambassador over indictment against Chinese military officers

Chinese Assistant Foreign Minister Zheng Zeguang summoned US Ambassador to China Max Baucus on Monday night, lodging a complaint with the US over its indictment against five Chinese military officers despite China’s protests, according to a press release by the Foreign Ministry Tuesday morning.

The United States seriously violated the norms of international relations, breached China-US cooperation in cyber security and badly hurt China-US ties by fabricating information and indicting Chinese military officers on allegations of cyber theft, Zheng said.

China expressed strong indignation and opposition to the move by the United States, he added.

More from South China Morning Post:

China warns Washington it could take ‘further action’ over US hacking charges

  • The US Justice Department on Monday indicted five members of the Chinese military on charges they stole US secrets through hacking to aid state-owned companies. Beijing quickly rejected the claims

The US Ambassador to China, Max Baucus, met with Zheng Zeguang, assistant foreign minister, shortly after the United States charged the five Chinese, accusing them of hacking into American nuclear, metal and solar companies to steal trade secrets.

Zheng “protested” the actions by the United States, saying the indictment had seriously harmed relations between both countries, state news agency Xinhua said.

Zheng told Baucus that depending on the development of the situation, China “will take further action on the so-called charges by the United States”.

Sky News raises the obvious defense:

China Angry Over US Spy Charges ‘Hypocrisy’

  • The United States is accused of “double standards” on cyber security after five Chinese officers are charged over alleged hacking.

Geng Yansheng, a Chinese defence spokesman, said the steps taken by the United States had “severely damaged the mutual trust” between the two countries.

“From Wikileaks to the Snowden incident, America’s hypocrisy and double standards on issues of cyber security are abundantly clear,” he said. “The Chinese military is a severe victim of America’s behaviour.

“According to statistics, the servers used by the Chinese military have been widely attacked by foreigners and according to the IP addresses, a significant number of them come from America.”

And then, inevitably, came this, from Sina English:

China publishes evidence of US cyber attack

A spokesperson for China’s State Internet Information Office on Monday published the latest data of US cyber attack, saying that China is a solid defender of cyber security.

The US is the biggest attacker of China’s cyber space, the spokesperson said, adding that the US charges of hacking against five Chinese military officers on Monday are “groundless”.

Latest data from the National Computer Network Emergency Response Technical Team Coordination Center of China (NCNERTTCC) showed that from March 19 to May 18, a total of 2,077 Trojan horse networks or botnet servers in the US directly controlled 1.18 million host computers in China.

intelNews.org backgrounds:

The mysterious Chinese unit behind the cyberespionage charges

On Monday, the United States government leveled for the first time charges against a group of identified Chinese military officers, allegedly for stealing American trade secrets through cyberespionage.

The individuals named in the indictment are all members of a mysterious unit within the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) command structure, known as Unit 61398. It is estimated that the unit has targeted at least 1,000 private or public companies and organizations in the past 12 years. Western cybersecurity experts often refer to the group as “APT1″, which stands for “Advanced Persistent Threat 1″, or “Byzantine Candor”. It is believed to operate under the Second Bureau of the PLA’s General Staff Department, which is responsible for collecting foreign military intelligence.

Many China military observers argue that Unit 61398 is staffed by several thousand operatives, who can be broadly categorized into two groups: one consisting of computer programmers and network operations experts, and the other consisting of English-language specialists, with the most talented members of the Unit combining both skills.

And Reuters strikes back:

China bans use of Microsoft’s Windows 8 on government computers

China has banned government use of Windows 8, Microsoft Corp’s latest operating system (OS), in a blow to the U.S. technology company which has long been plagued by sales woes in the country.

The Central Government Procurement Center issued the ban on installing Windows 8 on government computers as part of a notice on the use of energy-saving products, posted on its website last week.

The official Xinhua news agency said the ban was to ensure computer security after Microsoft ended support for its Windows XP operating system, which was widely used in China.

The same concept, another front, via the Associated Press:

Germany clamps down on exports of spy tech

Germany says it will restrict exports of surveillance technology to states that fail to respect their citizens’ human rights.

Economy Minister Sigmar Gabriel says the move is designed to prevent spy software ‘Made in Germany’ from being used for internal repression by autocratic regimes.

Amnesty International and Reporters Without Borders welcomed the decision. Rights groups have in the past accused German companies of selling spy software to countries such as Bahrain and Uzbekistan, where the technology is allegedly used to monitor dissidents and journalists.

Meanwhile, Agence France-Presse covers old school business, run both profitably and hypocritically:

Peace-loving Sweden ‘arms dictators’ as defence exports soar

Alongside a global reputation for peacemaking and generous foreign aid, Sweden has become a major world supplier of weapons counting a number of regimes criticised for human rights abuses among its customers.

Ranked the third largest arms exporter per capita after Israel and Russia, Sweden’s booming industry has stirred up ethical concerns among Swedes about some countries it is doing business with.

[C]ritics charge that Sweden has become more inclined to arm regimes accused of human rights abuses, including Saudi Arabia, UAE and Pakistan, as demand from Western nations has declined since the Cold War ended.

On to the Game of Drones, first with The Hill:

Reid: Drone-memo author is a go

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) says he has the votes to confirm David Barron, the author of memos justifying drone strikes against American citizens, to the 1st Circuit Court of Appeals.

Reid said most of the members of the Senate Democratic caucus were satisfied with the defense of Barron provided by White House lawyers at a private briefing last week.

“We’ll vote on the Barron filibuster, stopping that tomorrow. I think we’ll be okay,” Reid said at a Tuesday press conference.

Anchors Aweigh with United Press International:

Navy taps Textron Systems Unmanned Systems for task order work

The U.S. Navy has issued a task order to Textron Systems Unmanned Systems to support intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance data using its catapult-launched Aerosonde SUAS.

Textron Systems Unmanned Systems reports receipt of a new Navy task order to provide mission support services with its Aerosonde Small Unmanned Aircraft System.

The task order was issued under the Navy Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance contract, and indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity program under which Textron will supply the SUAS, together with system operators and field service representatives on a fee-for-service basis.

And from Aviation Week & Space Technology, strike up Le Marseillaise:

France Weighs Arming UAVs

  • France inches closer to a decision on arming UAVs

The French government is carefully avoiding raising ethical objections to the French air force’s use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), including General Atomics MQ-9 Reapers acquired from the U.S. and recently delivered to the 1/33 Sqdn. French authorities believe UAV reconnaissance capabilities -offer unprecedented advantages, while weapons continue to be carried only by manned combat aircraft such as Dassault -Mirage 2000Ds and Rafales.

Official comments on France’s employment of UAVs are rare and cautiously focus on their complementary role. “They are not expected to replace aircraft; they don’t cover the complete spectrum of operational needs,” says Col. Christophe Fontaine, head of the 1/33 Sqdn. “They complement other capabilities.”

The French forces, which long delayed expressing a clear policy on UAV use, have been operating limited numbers of EADS Harfangs and General Atomics MQ-1 Predators in the last few years and selected the Reaper in the absence of a satisfactory domestic candidate. The U.S. UAV entered service in France recently, and two have already accumulated 700 flight hours across several theaters of operation. The French air force plans to order a total of 12 Reapers, which are capable of carrying weapons—although only with Pentagon approval. To date, Washington has been reluctant to allow even allies such as France or Italy to arm the UAVs it sells them.

And for our final dronal item, sharing the wealth with TheLocal.it:

Finmeccanica launches European drone project

A subsidiary of Finmeccanica has joined forces with fellow aerospace companies in France and Germany to develop a European drone, months after the Italian company built the UN’s first such aircraft.

Alenia Aermacchi will work with France’s Dassault Aviation and Airbus Group in Germany to develop an unmanned aircraft by 2020, Finmeccanica said in a statement released on Monday.

Announcement of the project follows preliminary discussions at the Paris Air Show last year, Finmeccanica said. The three European companies have delivered the joint proposal to their respective governments and aim to develop the plans along with national defence ministries.

From the Christian Science Monitor, the first of three Libyan headlines, with the stinger at the end:

Rogue Libyan general attracts militia support as parliament flails

  • Libyans are waiting to see how the government responds to Khalifa Haftar’s recent attacks – but even decisive action is probably not enough to stem rising chaos.

A former Libyan general appears to be gaining allies among armed factions for his self-described campaign to restore stability in defiance of a weak government.

Two camps are taking shape: The Islamist politicians who dominate Libya’s interim parliament, and their rivals, who are gradually amassing behind Khalifa Haftar, the retired general. His forces have attacked Islamist militias in Benghazi and claimed credit for an attack on the General National Congress (GNC), as parliament is called.

In a bid yesterday to diffuse the crisis, acting prime minister Abdullah Al-Thinni called on the GNC to vote immediately on a 2014 budget and to confirm his successor, the prime minister-elect, before a recess and elections for a new interim legislature.

The Los Angeles Times gets clandestine:

Libyan lawmakers meet in secret after being targeted by ex-general

Libyan lawmakers met in hiding Tuesday, two days after forces loyal to a renegade ex-general stormed the parliament building and demanded that the Islamist-dominated body disband.

Onetime general Khalifa Haftar’s offensive against Islamists and their allied militias, launched last week in the eastern city of Benghazi, threatened to escalate into the worst fighting Libya has seen in the three years since an uprising ousted and killed dictator Moammar Kadafi.

It also posed a stark challenge to the weak central government, which has flailed in its attempts to establish order.

But it takes the World Socialist Web Site to get to the heart of the matter:

CIA-linked general launches Libya coup bid

The leader of the latest military revolt is a former Libyan army general, Khalifa Haftar. A supporter of the 1969 military revolt led by Colonel Gaddafi that overthrew the US and British-backed monarch, King Idris, Haftar was captured during the 1980s Libyan intervention in Chad and then released at Washington’s request, becoming an “asset” of the US Central Intelligence Agency. The CIA moved him to Virginia, near the agency’s headquarters in Langley, and helped him set up training camps for a “Libyan National Army”—the same name he has given to the collection of military and militia units now fighting to overthrow the regime in Tripoli.

When the US and NATO launched their war for regime change in Libya three years ago, Haftar was airlifted back into Benghazi to assume military command of proxy forces on the ground as the US and NATO bombarded the country. He was supplanted in this role, however, by a former Gaddafi interior minister, Abdel Fatah Younis, who was himself subsequently assassinated. He was then eclipsed by the Islamist militias who came to dominate the NATO-backed ground forces.

Meanwhile, from BBC News, a story few will believe in the countries where vaccinating for polio can be lethal to doctors and nurses because the program was arrogantly and lethally used by the CIA to suss out Osama bin Laden and presumably other things as well [can anyone saw war crime, giving the growing numbers of victims?]:

White House: CIA has ended use of vaccine programmes

The CIA has ended the use of vaccine programmes in its spying operations amid concerns for the safety of health workers, the White House has said.

In a letter to US public health schools, a White House aide said the CIA stopped such practices in August. The CIA used a fake vaccine programme to try to find Osama Bin Laden before US special forces killed him in 2011.

The CIA’s move comes after a wave of deadly attacks by militants on polio vaccination workers in Pakistan.

After the jump, shots fired in Korean waters, China/Vietnam tensions remain high, new alliances form, the Japanese remilitarization push morphs, and, oh yeah, folks claim North Korea’s got nuclear-capable missiles. . .
Continue reading

Headlines II: Spies, Zones, Drones, & Pols


Much ground to cover in today’s Tales from the Dark Side, so we’ll start with imperial dreams from Nextgov:

Former NSA Director: Big Data Is the Future

According to Gen. Keith Alexander, who retired in March after eight years as the director of the NSA, the world will produce some 3.5 zettabytes of information in 2014 – enough to fill the hard drives of 3.5 billion high-end desktop computers.

“We’re living in the age of big data and we have to figure out how to harness it,” said Alexander, speaking at the American Council for Technology – Industry Advisory Council’s (ACTIAC’s) Management of Change conference on Monday.

“That’s what the future is going to be about,” Alexander said. “Think about 3.5 zettabyes of data. Big data is absolutely vital. The changes that will come to our nation in science, technology, biomedical and health care will be phenomenal.”

And from the Guardian, as tensions heat up in the Asian Game of Zones, Washington takes the moment to hoist Beijing on the same petard that Snowden hoisted Washington with:

US accusations of Chinese hacking point to eight-year spying campaign

  • Department of Justice indictment confirms existence of projects such as ‘Titan Rain’ and pattern of attacks against US firms

The US Department of Justice indictment against a number of alleged Chinese military hackers goes back a long way, to 2006, and raises the question: why did it take them so long to take action?

In February 2013, a US security company called Mandiant released a report which said the Chinese army had launched hundreds of cyber-attacks against western companies and defence groups. It said that the attacks emanated from a building that housed a group called Unit 61398 –the same number that appears in the DOJ indictment.

If the DOJ indictments are correct, then Mandiant’s report appears to have been accurate in its description of what was happening. But that’s worrying, too: it described a decade-long series of attacks on US infrastructure, gave precise details, and even the location of the building from which it reckoned the attacks were being made.

The response from the Los Angeles Times:

China blasts ‘absurd’ U.S. charges of cyber-espionage

Chinese government officials on Monday strongly rebuked the U.S. over its claims of cyber-spying by five Chinese military officers, saying the Justice Department indictment was based on  “fabricated facts” and would jeopardize U.S.-China relations.

“The Chinese government, the Chinese military and their relevant personnel have never engaged or participated in cyber theft of trade secrets,” Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Qin Gang said in a statement. “The U.S. accusation against Chinese personnel is purely ungrounded and absurd.”

The Chinese government demanded that the U.S. indictment, unsealed Monday, be withdrawn. Chinese officials also said they would suspend activities of the China-U.S. Cyber Working Group, created last year to address allegations of hacking.

Details from the Associated Press:

Cyberspying case: charges at a glance

THE CHARGES: The indictment’s 31 counts include economic espionage, theft of trade secrets and aggravated identity theft. The federal grand jury indictment was filed in the Western District of Pennsylvania, where most of the companies that are said to have been targeted are located. The indictment accuses the officials of hacking into the computers of companies and a union to gain access to trade secrets and private communications.

THE ACCUSED: The indictment charges five officers of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army. They are Wang Dong, Sun Kailiang, Wen Xinyu, Huang Zhenyu, and Gu Chunhui.

THE ALLEGED TARGETS: Westinghouse Electric Co., U.S. subsidiaries of SolarWorld AG, United States Steel Corp., Allegheny Technologies Inc., Alcoa Inc. and the United Steelworkers labor union.

Sky News covers consequences:

US And China Spy Row: Diplomatic Fallout ‘Huge’

The US is for the first time accusing a nation of state-sponsored economic espionage or as they called it 21st century burglary.

The United States government is, for the first time ever, accusing another nation of state-sponsored economic espionage or as they called it “21st century burglary”.

The diplomatic fallout will be huge.

The officials from the Department of Justice not only singled out individuals from Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA), but they named the unit within the PLA which they say has been doing the hacking: Unit 61398.

It is not the first time the unit 61398 has been in the frame.

Still more from the New York Times:

U.S. Treads Fine Line in Fighting Chinese Espionage

By indicting members of the People’s Liberation Army’s most famous cyberwarfare operation, called Unit 61398 but known among hackers by the moniker “Comment Crew,” the Obama administration is now using the legal system to make a case it has previously confined to classified briefings: that the Chinese military leadership is behind an enormous organized campaign to steal American intellectual property and designs for its own profit.

For two years now, President Obama and his aides have declared that when the United States spies on China, its goals are sharply different from those of the Chinese who engage in espionage. In public speeches and private conversations with Xi Jinping, the Chinese president, Mr. Obama has argued that it is far more pernicious to use the intelligence instruments of the state for commercial competitive advantage. The United States may do all it can to learn about China’s nuclear arsenal, or about Beijing’s intentions in its territorial disputes with Japan, but it does not, the administration says, steal from China Telecom to help A.T.&T.

The United States spies regularly for economic advantage when the goal is to support trade negotiations; it tapped the Japanese negotiator’s car in the 1990s, when the United States was trying to reach an accord on auto imports. It is also widely believed to be using intelligence in support of major trade negotiations now underway with European and Asian trading partners. But in the view of a succession of Democratic and Republican administrations, that is considered fair game.

Companies can also be targets. Documents revealed by Mr. Snowden have revealed that the American government pried deep into the servers of Huawei, one of China’s most successful Internet and communications companies. The documents made clear that the N.S.A. was seeking to learn whether the company was a front for the People’s Liberation Army and whether it was interested in spying on American firms. But there was a second purpose: to get inside Huawei’s systems, and to use them as a conduit to spy on countries that buy its equipment around the world.

Another consequence from China Daily:

China suspends cyber working group activities with US to protest cyber theft indictment

China on Monday decided to suspend activities of the China-U.S. Cyber Working Group as U.S. announced indictment against five Chinese military officers on allegation of cyber theft.

“Given the lack of sincerity on the part of the US to solve issues related to cyber security through dialogue and cooperation, China has decided to suspend activities of the China-U.S. Cyber Working Group,” said Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang regarding the US Justice Department’s announcement on Monday.

The US side announced on Monday indictment against five Chinese military officers on allegation of cyber theft. This U.S. move, which is based on intentionally-fabricated facts, grossly violates the basic norms governing international relations and jeopardizes China-U.S. cooperation and mutual trust, Qin said.

BBC News reminds of Washington’s status as a player in the same game:

Cisco calls for curb on NSA surveillance efforts

The NSA’s wide-ranging surveillance programme should be curtailed, says hardware-maker Cisco in a letter to President Obama.

Cisco boss John Chambers said faith in US technology companies was being eroded by the NSA’s activities.

The letter comes after whistleblowers revealed the NSA regularly intercepted Cisco hardware to help it gather information on potential targets.

Mr Chambers said the NSA should be held to higher “standards of conduct”.

Meanwhile whack at the branch from the Guardian:

NSA to test legal limits on surveillance if USA Freedom Act becomes law

  • Aides and lawyers contend over terms of surveillance bill
  • Authors of first realistic reform seek to avoid loopholes

Those behind the legislation, which is expected to head to the House floor as early as this week, have labored to craft the terms of the bill in a way that avoids loopholes for the NSA to exploit. But some wonder whether the agency will lawyer the bill’s restrictions on bulk data collection into oblivion, as recent statements by Obama administration officials have suggested it might.

The NSA, its credibility hurt by whistleblower Edward Snowden’s disclosures, is trying to reassure its overseers that it will abide by new congressional action, even as its advocates labor to shape the bill to its liking. But the agency’s post-9/11 history has left the architects and advocates of the bill concerned about the ways in which it might once again reinterpret a law intended to restrain it into one allowing it more surveillance leeway than congressional architects intend.

Meetings last week between Hill aides and administration and intelligence lawyers yielded a sense of the legal reasoning likely to result if the USA Freedom Act becomes law.

And the guy behind it all faces a dilemma, via Spiegel:

‘Risks’: Snowden’s Lawyer Expresses Concerns about Testimony

  • Speculation has been brewing for weeks over whether Edward Snowden will testify against the NSA from Moscow or Germany. In a letter to a parliamentary investigative committee, his lawyer has said he will advise his client against speaking in Russia.

With the German parliament currently investigating spying by the National Security Agency on Chancellor Angela Merkel’s cell phone and the communications data of millions of German citizens, testimony by former NSA employee and whistleblower Edward Snowden was expected to take center stage in the proceedings. But a four-page letter from Snowden’s German attorney, Wolfgang Kaleck, obtained by SPIEGEL, casts doubt on whether he will be able to provide testimony from Moscow for the parliamentary investigative committee.

In the letter, Kaleck specifies the “risks” associated with Snowden providing testimony in Russia, where, he notes, his client has only been provided with temporary political asylum.

“Given the conditions of his right of residence,” Kaleck writes, “both I and his American lawyers will have to advise him against speaking in any manner from Moscow that might make his situation worse or possibly threaten his residency status.”

From the Los Angeles Times, major voyeurware busts:

Cybercrime: Creators, users of sinister Blackshades malware arrested

Federal prosecutors announced charges Monday against creators and users of a sinister software program called Blackshades, whose flagship feature, RAT, enabled hackers to watch victims in their own homes using their infected computers’ webcams.

At a news conference, FBI agents and the U.S. attorney in Manhattan, Preet Bharara, said they had arrested one of Blackshades’ alleged creators, Alex Yucel, in Moldova. Yucel is awaiting extradition to the United States. Also arrested was Brendan Johnston of Thousand Oaks, who, according to court documents, sold Blackshades to others and provided technical support to customers between August 2011 and September 2012.

According to the FBI, Blackshades had sales of more than $350,000 between September 2010 and April 2014. Buyers came from more than 100 countries and infected more than a half-million computers.

And a Blackshades video report from Canada, via The National:

Blackshades Takedown

Program note:

The FBI has arrested dozens of people suspected of distributing suspected a malicious software called BlackShades. It allows hackers to remotely control personal computers and webcams.

From Guardian, ringfencing the royals:

William and Kate ‘embarrassed’ by hacking revelations, says NoW reporter

  • Clive Goodman tells Old Bailey the police and CPS decided to ‘ringfence’ interception of royals to keep them out of a trial

The royal family has been “embarrassed” by revelations that the News of the World had frequently hacked the phones of Prince William and Kate Middleton, it has been claimed at the Old Bailey.

Clive Goodman, the former royal editor at the paper, said the police and the Crown Prosecution Service had known he had hacked their phones in 2006 when he was first arrested but they had decided to “ringfence” the royals so they wouldn’t have to be part of a public trial.

He was convicted of hacking three royal aides – Helen Asprey, Jamie Lowther-Pinkerton and Paddy Harverson – in 2006 but his hacking of the princes and William’s then girlfriend only emerged last week in the phone-hacking trial.

The Yomiuri Shimbun covers another species of hackery:

Identity thieves target customer loyalty websites

Websites for customer loyalty programs have seen a growing number of thefts of member program points and illegal access to customer accounts.

These companies have found cases of illegal access to loyalty program sites of airlines, home electronics makers, credit card companies and other firms. In some cases, online thieves have exchanged stolen points for gift certificates without the genuine holders knowing.

Affected companies and Internet crime experts say that some of the hackers appear to have used lists of user IDs and passwords, because in some cases the success rate of log-in attempts was unusually high.

One of the experts reminded users that “The best defense measure is changing passwords regularly and not using the same passwords for different websites.”

And the accompanying graphic:

The Yomiuri Shimbun

The Yomiuri Shimbun

From the Independent, a terror alert:

American student calls in bomb threat after dropping out so her ‘parents wouldn’t find out’

A Massachusetts dropout student was arrested after allegedly calling in two bomb threats to force her graduation ceremony to be cancelled on Sunday.

Danielle Shea, 22, reportedly told authorities she had dropped out of university, but kept receiving thousands of dollars in tuition fees money from her mother, who believed she was still attending classes.

Police say the former Quinnipiac University student panicked when her relatives did see not her name on the graduation roster and made two calls to the university’s public safety department in a bid to force the ceremony to be cancelled.

The Christian Science Monitor offers a modicum of security:

Supreme Court vacates police-immunity ruling in suit over multiple Tasering

The Supreme Court ordered the New Orleans-based Fifth Circuit to reexamine a case involving a suit against a police officer for repeatedly Tasering a handcuffed arrestee who was lying on the ground.

The US Supreme Court ordered a federal appeals court Monday to reexamine a case involving the alleged use of excessive force by a police officer in Louisiana who deployed an electronic “Taser” device eight times against a handcuffed arrestee who was lying on the ground.

The suspect, who later died, had reportedly refused to obey a police command to stand up and walk to the patrol car. The police officer was fired for using “unnecessary force,” but was found not guilty of manslaughter.

A panel of the New Orleans-based Fifth US Circuit Court of Appeals subsequently ruled that the officer was entitled to qualified immunity and could not be sued for allegedly violating the rights of the handcuffed prisoner.

CNBC offers another reason for insecurity, at least in the halls of the Pentagon:

Retired military leaders fret kids will be ‘too fat to fight’

  • Obese recruits are newest threat to US military

“It’s not just a school problem. It’s not just a Department (of Education) problem. It’s a national security issue and it needs to be prioritized that way,” said retired Maj. Gen. D. Allen Youngman.

He’s one of hundreds of former military officers who have gotten involved in Mission: Readiness, a nonprofit organization whose “Too Fat to Fight” reports attack junk food in schools. Its members also lobby lawmakers for improved school lunches and more widely available pre-K education.

These military officials say such interventions are necessary for increasing the pool of people who want to serve in the military and would be able to do so.

From RT, heightening tensions:

US missile cruiser to enter Black Sea amid NATO drills in Eastern Europe – military source

The US missile cruiser Vella Gulf is expected to arrive in the Black Sea on May 23, a military source told a Russian news agency. Another NATO vessel is already in the area, while the French Navy’s stealth frigate will reportedly be there by late May.

This comes as part of a wider buildup of NATO forces close to Russian borders against the backdrop of the Ukraine crisis.

The American Aegis guided missile cruiser will be in the Black Sea in time for the Ukrainian presidential elections on May 25, a military-diplomatic source told Russia’s Itar-Tass news agency on Monday.

And from The Hill, our first drone report:

Obama backs off drone strikes

President Obama is relying less on drones and more on foreign governments in the global fight against terrorists.

The shift, which also includes fewer unilateral special operations raids of the type that killed Osama bin Laden, is prompting criticism that Washington depends on unstable governments such as in Nigeria, where Boko Haram, an extremist group, has emerged as a new threat.

The Pentagon has hiked its budget for “Section 1206″ counterterrorism programs to train and equip foreign militaries from $218.6 million in 2012 to a requested $290.2 million in 2014, according to a recent Congressional Research Service report.

A second from Deutsche Welle:

European aviation firms Airbus, Dassault, Alenia poised to produce military drones

Europe’s leading aviation companies have teamed up to develop and produce drones for military purposes in a drive to become independent of US technology. But governments have to decide about the drone’s capabilities.

European aviation and defense companies Airbus, Dassault Aviation and Alenia Aermacchi said Monday they had launched a new initiative for the production of military drones for medium-altitude and long endurance (MALE) missions.

They offered to hold talks with the governments of Germany, France and Italy to agree on the drones’ future capabilities. The companies said they had already signed a cooperation accord between them and decided on the division of labor at an industrial level.

European policy-makers have long debated the need to develop a military drone but have so far not been able to agree on a joint program.

After the jump, the latest from the Asian Game of Zones, including evacuations, promises, threats, assertions, and a trans-border germ invasion. . . Continue reading

Map of the day: Japan’s expansive base plan


From the Yomiuri Shimbun, a map of Japan’s expansive plans for a vast military zone to be garrisoned by bases and fast-response military units as the nation move to remilitarize for the first time since World War II. More to follow in our next headlines compendium:

BLOG Game of ZOnes

Headlines II: Spooks, pols, zones, drones, more


Today’s tales of from the dark side covers everything from political deception to the latest heated developments in the Asian Game of Zones as Washington pushes Japan into remilitarization and anxieties and violence rise.

But we begin at home with that political decepetion, covered by the McClatchy Washington Bureau:

Bill to curb NSA spying looks like change, but isn’t really

The bipartisan bill that aims to put serious curbs on the National Security Agency’s mass collection of Americans’ communications is being hailed by Republicans and Democrats as a big breakthrough.

It’s not.

“The bottom line: This is largely faux reform and a surveillance salve,” said Thomas Drake, a former NSA senior official turned whistle-blower who’s critical of the agency’s collection programs. “To date, neither the House nor Senate attempts go far enough.”

Another angle, covered by the Guardian:

Everyone should know just how much the government lied to defend the NSA

  • A web of deception has finally been untangled: the Justice Department got the US supreme court to dismiss a case that could have curtailed the NSA’s dragnet. Why?

If you blinked this week, you might have missed the news: two Senators accused the Justice Department of lying about NSA warrantless surveillance to the US supreme court last year, and those falsehoods all but ensured that mass spying on Americans would continue. But hardly anyone seems to care – least of all those who lied and who should have already come forward with the truth.

Here’s what happened: just before Edward Snowden became a household name, the ACLU argued before the supreme court that the Fisa Amendments Act – one of the two main laws used by the NSA to conduct mass surveillance – was unconstitutional.

In a sharply divided opinion, the supreme court ruled, 5-4, that the case should be dismissed because the plaintiffs didn’t have “standing” – in other words, that the ACLU couldn’t prove with near-certainty that their clients, which included journalists and human rights advocates, were targets of surveillance, so they couldn’t challenge the law. As the New York Times noted this week, the court relied on two claims by the Justice Department to support their ruling: 1) that the NSA would only get the content of Americans’ communications without a warrant when they are targeting a foreigner abroad for surveillance, and 2) that the Justice Department would notify criminal defendants who have been spied on under the Fisa Amendments Act, so there exists some way to challenge the law in court.

From Süddeutsche Zeitung, a show of resistance from Berlin:

Germany Plans To Ban Tech Companies That Play Ball With NSA

It didn’t take an Edward Snowden to figure out that American espionage service providers had access to confidential information about German citizens. It’s been known for years that the Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) works for American secret services.

It’s also known that a former CSC subsidiary was involved in the abduction of German citizen Khaled el-Masri, who was turned over to the CIA and subjected to abuse and degradation before the agency finally admitted his arrest and torture were a mistake.

Nevertheless, German CSC subsidiaries have in past years received more than 100 contracts from state and federal governments in Germany, as Süddeutsche Zeitung and public broadcaster NDR reported last fall. The operative rule at the time was that only companies that were found guilty of crimes could be excluded from public contracts. So far, no CSC employee has been prosecuted for the abduction of el-Masri. Per se, working for the U.S. intel agencies is not punishable. So Germany’s federal government tied its own hands over the issue.

Turning the panopticon into art, via the Guardian:

Conversnitch turns covert surveillance into an art form

Somewhere in Manhattan, a lightbulb, a Raspberry Pi and a Wi-Fi card are listening in on idle chat and tweeting what they hear

In the pre-Snowden era, believing that a household object was speaking to you was enough to have you committed to correctional facilities for state-sponsored reprogramming.

In his new book, Nowhere to Hide, the journalist Glenn Greenwald explains how he and the NSA contractor turned whistleblower put their phones in a freezer with the batteries disconnected to thwart spooks’ ability to operate phones remotely as microphones. But what would happen if the fridge itself was listening to your words?

Two American artists are now taking that concept to a logical conclusion. Using only a credit card-sized Raspberry Pi computer, a microphone and a Wi-Fi card hacked into a lightbulb fitting, and a piece of open source software hosted at Github, they have installed a listening device at an undisclosed spot in Manhattan, New York, and connected it to a Twitter feed.

RT covers the hackable:

Tor-provided web anonymity not PRISM-proof – Microsoft security guru

The Tor anonymity network cannot provide internet users shelter from government hackers and cyber criminals, a top Microsoft security expert has revealed.

“There is no such thing as really being anonymous on the internet. If [hackers and government agencies] want you, they will get you,” Andy Malone, of Microsoft Enterprise Security and founder of the Cyber Crime Security Forum, said at the Microsoft TechEd North America 2014.

While The Onion Router (Tor) remains more resilient than alternatives such as virtual private networks, cyber criminals are able to exploit weaknesses in the system.

From the McClatchy Washington Bureau, to tell the truth:

Spy satellite agency says it fixed its ‘broken’ polygraph program

The nation’s spy satellite agency has announced it overhauled its lie detector program after its inspector general found “significant shortcomings” that could put national security at risk.

The National Reconnaissance Office’s inspector general found the problems were so widespread that one senior official described the agency’s polygraph program as “terribly broken.”

“This official added that the current status of the NRO polygraph program is ‘bleak,’” the inspector general report said.

The Guardian covers a Russian cutoff:

Russia halts rocket exports to US, hitting space and military programmes

  • Russia announces decision to halt export of crucial rocket engines in response to US sanctions over annexation of Crimea

Russia’s deputy prime minister, Dmitry Rogozin, has announced it will halt the export of rocket engines crucial to the US military defence and space programmes.

The move marks a serious deterioration in US-Russian cooperation in space, which for two decades had remained largely above Earthly politics. It could prove a serious set back for the ailing US space programme.

The Russian RD-180 engine has been in production since 1999. The US has imported more than forty of them to power its Atlas V rockets into space.

From RT, an added twist to the already controversial:

GMO producers should be punished as terrorists, Russian MPs say

A draft law submitted to the Russian parliament seeks to impose punishment up to criminal prosecution to producers of genetically-modified organisms harmful to health or the environment.

The draft legislation submitted on Wednesday amends Russia’s law regulating GMOs and some other laws and provides for disciplinary action against individuals and firms, which produce or distribute harmful biotech products and government officials who fail to properly control them.

At worst, a criminal case may be launched against a company involved in introducing unsafe GMOs into Russia. Sponsors of the bill say that the punishment for such deeds should be comparable to the punishment allotted to terrorists, if the perpetrators act knowingly and hurt many people.

IDG News Service covers corporate snoopage:

Online advertising poses significant security, privacy risks to users, US Senate report says

  • The online ad industry should offer better protections against ‘malvertising,’ a US Senate investigation found

The current state of online advertising endangers the security and privacy of users and the U.S. Federal Trade Commission should force the industry to offer better protections through comprehensive regulation, the U.S. Senate said in a report.

The report includes findings and recommendations of the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations of the Senate’s Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs following an investigation into the distribution of malware through online ads — also known as “malvertising.” It was followed by a hearing Thursday that included testimony from Yahoo and Google about their efforts to combat such threats.

“Consumers can incur malware attacks [through online ads] without having taken any action other than visiting a mainstream website,” the subcommittee said, referencing two attacks that involved malicious ads distributed through Yahoo and Google ad networks.

Criminalization in the corporate interest from the Guardian [and can the “terrorism” label be far behind?]:

Sussex police under fire for ‘criminalising’ fracking protests

  • Force accused of misusing section 14 orders last year with just 29 convictions resulting from 126 arrests at Cuadrilla site

Most of the people arrested during a summer of demonstrations against fracking in the village of Balcombe have been acquitted, leading to accusations that police tactics in a £4m operation criminalised peaceful protest.

The last of the criminal trials resulting from 126 arrests made by Sussex police during days of action outside the Cuadrilla site last summer finished this month. Of 114 charges, relating to 90 individuals, only 29 resulted in convictions, according to freedom of information responses from the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) and the police.

Sussex police are accused of using mass arrests, draconian bail conditions and section 14 notices under the Public Order Act 1986 to criminalise peaceful protest at the site in Balcombe, where the energy firm Cuadrilla conducted exploratory drilling.

And an appealing possibility from the Guardian:

David Miranda allowed to appeal against ruling on Heathrow detention

  • Partner of former Guardian reporter to challenge high court ruling on legality of his detention under counter-terrorism powers

David Miranda, partner of the former Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald, has been granted permission to appeal against a ruling that he was lawfully detained under counter-terrorism powers at Heathrow airport.

The case – which also involves a challenge to the police seizure of computer material related to the US National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden – will now go to the court of appeal.

In February, three high court judges – Lord Justice Laws, Mr Justice Ouseley and Mr Justice Openshaw – concluded that Miranda’s detention at Heathrow under schedule 7 to the Terrorism 2000 Act in last summer was legal, proportionate and did not breach European human rights protections of freedom of expression.

From the Guardian, grounds for domestic insecurity:

Albuquerque police promote officer accused of burning off man’s ear

  • Timothy Gonterman promoted despite report that was severely critical of Albuquerque police’s use of excessive force

Albuquerque police promoted a commander who was accused in a lawsuit of burning off part a homeless man’s ear with a stun gun, officials announced Thursday.

Albuquerque police department chief Gorden Eden said in a statement he was promoting two Albuquerque commanders to the newly created rank of major in response to a harsh US Justice Department report that was critical of Albuquerque police’s use of excessive force and demanded the agency adopt a number of reforms.

Foothills area commander Timothy Gonterman and criminal investigations commander Anthony Montano will now oversee the East and West Side field services divisions respectively, Eden said.

intelNews.org turns a blind eye:

US Secretary of Defense ‘not aware’ of Israel spying on America

The supreme official of the United States Department of Defense has said he is “unaware of the facts” behind recent media reports that Israel is aggressively spying on America.

Chuck Hagel, a former Republican Senator who assumed the leadership of the Pentagon in 2013, is on a three-day official visit to Israel, where he is scheduled to hold meetings with Israeli military and security officials.

He was responding to a question posed by an Israeli reporter about allegations, made by American newsmagazine Newsweek on Tuesday, that Israel’s spies “have gone too far” in targeting American interests. In

From the McClatchy Washington Bureau, prodding the bear:

Ukraine crisis may lead to Western military bases closer to Russia

When Pentagon chief Chuck Hagel and other NATO defense ministers meet in Brussels in early June, their summit will be dominated by questions that would have seemed surreal just a few months ago.

How should Western leaders respond to military aggression by Moscow in Ukraine?

With defense budgets flat or declining in most of NATO’s 28 member countries and U.S. forces in Europe at their lowest levels in decades, is the trans-Atlantic alliance adequately prepared to defend its vast territory?

In the most extreme scenario, are the United States and its European allies strong enough to go to war against Russia?

From CNBC, say hello to Skynet:

Military dream come true: One system, many drones

One of the strongest wishes of America’s increasingly digital defense industry is to find a way to monitor or control several pieces of equipment on a single operating system. This is especially true in the field of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), where too often, each manufacturer creates a unique platform for its drone, and customers who buy several different kinds of drones cannot easily coordinate operation between them.

That’s changing.

Now, buyers of a version of one of the most prolific UAVs on the market will soon be able to buy an operating system that can work with other drones. General Atomics Aeronautical Systems has been given permission by the Defense Department to sell unarmed versions of its famed Predator, called the Predator XP, to international customers in places like the Middle East, or friendly allies bordering the Ukraine and Russia, like Poland.

As for Skynet, consider a clip from Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines:

Skynet takes over

But it’s not just drones, as another CNBC story reports:

Defense tech in 2039: The robots are coming

In 25 years, the U.S. military will operate under the principle of “less is more.”

Less manpower. More robots.

Robots on the battlefield of the future will carry a heavier load, both literally and figuratively. They will operate with more freedom and begin to think for themselves. They will be armed and take on more tasks.

“I think you’ll see many of the high-risk missions done by autonomous platforms,” said Tim Trainer, vice president of product management for defense and security at iRobot.

IRobot is perhaps best known for its Roomba vacuum, but it has a growing arsenal of defense and security robots—everything from a five-pound robot that can be easily tossed and even dropped on its head, to a 500-pound robot that can lift close to its own weight. A trainer demonstrated some of the robots at the company headquarters in Bedford, Mass., and he sees a future where one person can control multiple machines operating on a single software system without having to constantly monitor them.

With so many American drones striking at with Pakistan’s borders, Defense One joins the club:

Pakistan Wants Drones and It Doesn’t Need America’s Permission to Get Them

one breath to the next, Pakistani officials make the case for and against drone strikes. Ahsan Iqbal, Pakistan’s minister of planning and development, for instance, calls American drone operations “very counterproductive.” He says, “If they hit one target, they also bring collateral damage…. The whole tribe stands up, we get into more problems, and the U.S. gets bad publicity.”

But, Iqbal offers, Pakistan “should have the technology to do it.

Already, Pakistan has remote-piloted aircraft. Islamabad uses surveillance drones to provide the military with a real-time picture of its restive border areas or counterterrorism operations. Pakistan unveiled two new drones in November: Burraq, named after the winged horse from the heavens that transported Islamic prophets, and Shahpar. They were developed by Pakistan’s defense industry, the government said, and would not be armed.

From BBC News, an underwater drone tanks:

Malaysia flight MH370: Defective drone delays search

The search for a missing Malaysia Airlines plane has been delayed after the discovery of a technical issue with the underwater drone used in the hunt.

The communications equipment on the Bluefin-21, on loan from the US, has a “defect”, Australia’s Joint Agency Coordination Centre (JACC) said.

It is now awaiting spare parts from the UK before it can continue its search in the southern Indian Ocean.

Nextgov catches a virus:

Heartbleed Superbug Found in Utility Monitoring Systems

Software that monitors utility plants and other operations at several military installations has been found to be affected by the recently discovered superbug Heartbleed, when configured a certain way, according to the Homeland Security Department and the software’s manufacturer.

“The latest release of Schneider Electric Wonderware Intelligence Version 1.5 SP1 is not susceptible to the OpenSSL vulnerability. However, users have been known to reinstall Tableau Server, the vulnerable third-party component that is affected. Therefore, Schneider Electric Wonderware has issued a patch and a security bulletin addressing this vulnerability in all versions,” states a bulletin from the DHS Cyber Emergency Response Team.

Exploits made by hackers “that target this vulnerability are known to be publicly available” on the Web, DHS said. Heartbleed is a defect in common Web encryption software that researchers discovered in early April.

From Channel NewsAsia Singapore, considerations of privacy:

Sector-specific guidelines to offer clarity on personal data matters

SINGAPORE: The Personal Data Protection Commission (PDPC) will be releasing advisory guidelines for the education, social services and healthcare sectors to provide greater clarity on the sectors’ obligations under the Personal Data Protection Act (PDPA).

The guidelines will be open for public consultation on Friday.

In his opening address at the Personal Data Protection Seminar 2014 on Friday morning, Minister for Communications and Information Yaacob Ibrahim said the guidelines will address sector-specific matters.

After the jump, the Asian Game of Zones intensifies, with Chinese fleeing Vietnam as the body count and burned business costs become clearer inthe ake of violent portest over Chinese oil drilling on an Island claimed by Hanoi, Japan raises the pressure as remilitarization becomes a done deal, and a lot more. . . Continue reading

Chart of the day II: Redfined Japanese militarism


From the Asahi Shimbun, the new rules of the military game under Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s first stage in an Obama-backed push to turn Japan into the an Asian \military proxy:

BLOG Japan

 

A powerful duo: Chris Hedges and Mr. Fish


For all you readers who are fond of Mr. Fish and inspired by the passionate words for former New York Times Mideast Bureau Chief Chris Hedges, here’s a chance to watch them together, during a joint speaking appearance last moth.

Without further ado [but not adieu], from videographer Leigha Cohen:

Chris Hedges and Dwayne “Mr. Fish” Booth: War and its Meaning

Program notes:

Chris Hedges and Dwayne Booth “Mr. Fish” spoke on April 24, 2014 at the University of Connecticut. This was part of a week long event sponsored by The Humanities Institute and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

The Title for today was War and its Meaning. The first 32 minutes of the video Chris Hedges gives an impassioned talk on his personal experiences and political thoughts on this topic. This is then followed by an amazing 25 minute Q&A period where both Chris hedges and Dwayne Booth respond to several questions asked by the audience and as always what is said is amazingly thought provoking. Both Dwayne Booth and Chris Hedges have been working collaborators and good friends for the last 6 years.
.
Hedges spent nearly two decades as a foreign correspondent in Central America, the Middle East, Africa and the Balkans. He was an early and outspoken critic of the US plan to invade and occupy Iraq and called the press coverage at the time “shameful cheer leading.” In 2002, he was part of a team of reporters for The New York Times who won a Pulitzer Prize for the paper’s coverage of global terrorism.

That same year he won an Amnesty International Global Award for Human Rights Journalism.He speaks Arabic, French, and Spanish, and studied Latin and Ancient Greek at Harvard. On November 3, 2011, Hedges was arrested with others in New York as part of the Occupy Wall Street demonstration, during which Hedges and others staged a “people’s hearing “on the investment bank Goldman Sachs and then blocked the entrance to their corporate headquarters.

And here’s a separate interview with Mr. Fish:

Dwayne “Mr Fish” Booth Private Interview

Program notes:

Dwayne Booth “Mr. Fish” spoke on April 24, 2014 at the University of Connecticut. This was part of a week long event sponsored by The Humanities Institute and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences “War and its Meaning”.

After the event I was granted a private interview with Mr. Fish where he reveals his early inspirations for his art, his politics and cartooning. He also describes his 5 year working relationship with Chris Hedges who attended and spoke at that days events. At the end of the short interview appears several on MR. Fish’s Cartoons.

Dwayne Booth (Mr. Fish) has been a cartoonist and freelance writer for twenty years, publishing under both his own name and the pen name of Mr. Fish with many of the nation’s most reputable and prestigious magazines, journals and newspapers. In addition to Harper’s Magazine and Truthdig.com, his work has appeared in The Los Angeles Times, The Village Voice, Vanity Fair, Mother Jones Magazine, the Advocate, Z Magazine, the Utne Reader, Slate.com, MSNBC.com and others.

Headlines II: Spies, drones, zones, and pols


We begin today’s tales from the dark side with a deal from the New York Times:

Sony Pictures Buys Film Rights to Book on Snowden

After a long, slow haul, the film rights to Glenn Greenwald’s book about Edward J. Snowden and his revelations about electronic surveillance by United States security officials have found a home, at Sony Pictures Entertainment.

Sony said on Wednesday that it had acquired rights to Mr. Greenwald’s book, “No Place to Hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA and the U. S. Surveillance State,” for the producers Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli. Mr. Wilson and Ms. Broccoli are known for their work on James Bond films like “Skyfall” and “Quantum of Solace,” both of which were released by Sony and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.

Mr. Greenwald’s book, whose rights were represented by both the Paradigm agency and Writers House, had been in consideration around Hollywood since the fall, as potential buyers fretted about how to tell a real-life story that is still playing out. Mr. Snowden remains in Russia, and is wanted by the authorities in the United States, where he faces criminal charges. Last month, he retained a Washington lawyer in hopes of reaching a plea deal with federal prosecutors.

Another whistleblower may also catch a break, though not nearly so lucrative, via BBC News:

US ‘considers Manning transfer’ to civilian prison

The Pentagon is considering transferring Private Chelsea Manning to a civilian prison in order to treat her gender dysphoria, US media report.

Pte Manning, formerly known as Bradley, was sentenced to 35 years in military prison for leaking a massive trove of classified US documents.

After the conviction, she announced the desire to live as a woman. However, the US military prohibits transgender people from serving openly in the military.

From Ars Technica, a major cyberfail:

Al-Qaeda’s new homebrew crypto apps may make US intel-gathering easier

NSA spying revelations led to development of three new encryption apps.

Terrorists loyal to al Qaeda and its offshoots are using new encryption software, most likely in response to revelations that the National Security Agency is able to bypass standard cryptographic protections as part of an expansive surveillance program, according to a recently released report from intelligence firm Recorded Future.

The three new major encryption tools were adopted within a three- to five-month period following leaks from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, according to the report. The apps replace or bolster the original Mujahideen Secrets crypto program that al Qaeda members have mainly used for e-mail since 2007. One of the new releases, known as Tashfeer al-Jawwal, is a mobile program developed by the Global Islamic Media Front and released in September. A second, Asrar al-Ghurabaa, was released by the Islamic State of Iraq and Al-Sham in November, around the same time the group broke away from the main al Qaeda group following a power struggle. The third program is known as Amn al-Mujahid and was released in December by that Al-Fajr Technical Committee.

The influx of new programs for al Qaeda members came amid revelations that the NSA was able to decode vast amounts of encrypted data traveling over the Internet. Among other things, according to documents Snowden provided, government-sponsored spies exploited backdoors or crippling weaknesses that had been surreptitiously and intentionally built in to widely used standards.

The Guardian covers hackery by corporate hacks for the Rupester:

News of the World royal editor: I hacked Kate Middleton 155 times

  • Clive Goodman tells phone-hacking trial he himself intercepted princes’ voicemails, but has never been asked about it by police

Kate Middleton was hacked 155 times by a reporter on the News of the World who said he snooped on her voicemails on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, the Old Bailey has heard.

Clive Goodman, the paper’s former royal editor, also revealed for the first time he directly hacked the phone of Prince William, adding that police had failed to ask him a single question about it in the eight years since he was arrested on related charges.

He told jurors he hacked Prince William 35 times, Prince Harry nine times and the Duchess of Cambridge 155 times.

CBC News covers specious secrecy involving a widely publicized Ottawa visit by U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron:

David Cameron’s ‘top-secret’ visit to Canada revealed

Access to Information request results in redaction of name of British PM on official visit to Canada The Privy Council Office, it seems, is working hard to protect the identity of those who visit the prime minister.

According to documents recently released under Access to Information, the name of an individual who paid an official visit to Canada in September 2011 must be withheld because it is considered “personal information.”

Owing to an apparent clerical error, however, CBC News has uncovered the identity of the mystery world leader in question. One page in the batch of documents was printed in duplicate: one time with names blanked out and the other with the names readable.

The documents show the deletion was meant to be “Prime Minister Cameron,” presumably referring to British Prime Minister David Cameron.

From PCWorld, about damn time:

Senators want to limit companies’ use of student data

Two U.S. senators want to prohibit companies from sharing students’ personal data when advertising their products or services and require that organizations holding student data put data security safeguards in place.

A proposal from Senators Ed Markey, a Massachusetts Democrat, and Orrin Hatch, a Utah Republican, would largely regulate the use of student data by private companies. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 generally requires public schools to get parental consent before sharing students’ personal data with third parties, but lawmakers and some privacy groups have raised concerns in recent months that those protections are weakened when schools outsource data processing and other functions.

Markey and Hatch on Wednesday released a discussion draft of legislation called the Protecting Student Privacy Act. In addition to data protection and data-sharing rules, the proposal would allow parents to access personal information about their children held by private companies and change incorrect information.

From the Guardian, another despicable neoliberal move:

Privacy groups demand rethink over HMRC plan to sell tax data

  • Three groups hand in petition of 300,000 signatures, and Lib Dem MP says proposed scheme would undermine confidentiality

HM Revenue and Customs must rethink its plans to share millions of people’s personal tax data with private companies and researchers, a prominent Lib Dem MP and privacy campaigners have said – as they handed in a petition of 300,000 signatures to the government.

Julian Huppert, a Lib Dem member of the Commons home affairs committee, said HMRC would “seriously undermine the confidentiality we expect” if it proceeded with the proposal to relax restrictions on sharing taxpayer data and potentially selling it to private firms.

Although the data would be anonymised, critics fear it could include details about income, tax arrangements and payment history and carry a risk that people could be identified. The campaign groups 38 Degrees, Open Rights Group and Sum of Us handed in a petition calling for an end to the plans.

From Aero-News Network, our first drone story and an apparent win for the private sector:

FAA To Expedite Limited Commercial Operations Of UAS

  • Association For Unmanned Vehicle Systems International Welcomes Move To Advance UAS Integration

Perhaps realizing that the UAV train has already left the station … during a speech at AUVSI’s Unmanned Systems 2014, FAA Manager of UAS Integration Jim Williams on Tuesday announced that the FAA is working with several industries to expedite some limited commercial operations of UAS before UAS rules are finalized.

“We applaud the FAA for working collaboratively with the industry and other stakeholders to help UAS technology begin to take off,” said AUVSI President and CEO Michael Toscano. “UAS have a host of societal and economic benefits, and many industries are clamoring to harness their capabilities. Limited commercial operations is a good first step, but we also need to begin the small UAS rulemaking immediately. We look forward to continue working with the FAA to advance UAS integration safely and responsibly.”

Specifically, Williams said the FAA is expected to allow limited commercial operations for filmmaking, powerline inspection, precision agriculture and flare stack inspection. Williams said these industries approached the FAA for expedited approvals.

CNN covers the latest dronal body count:

Drone strike kills at least 10 militants near Afghan-Pakistani border, official says

A U.S. drone strike Wednesday morning killed at least 10 militants and injured 14 near the Afghan-Pakistani border, a Pakistani military official said.

The attack targeted militants in Afghanistan’s Nangarhar province, the official said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

It wasn’t immediately clear which militant group or groups were targeted.

And from Ars Technica, a good PR move for the military’s drones:

US sends its giant spy drone to look for kidnapped Nigerian girls

  • It can look through trees, but can a Global Hawk find 276 girls in the forest?

The drone that the United States Air Force sees as the replacement for the venerable U-2 spy plane is now flying surveillance missions over Nigeria as part of the search for 276 schoolgirls kidnapped by the Boko Haram terrorist group. A Northrop Grumman RQ-4 Global Hawk flew a mission over Nigeria on Tuesday, according to an NBC News report.

The Global Hawk, which first flew in 1998, can stay airborne for up to 28 hours and has a range of 8,700 miles. It has a wingspan close to that of a Boeing 747, weighs more than 32,000 pounds, and carries the Hughes Integrated Surveillance and Reconnaissance (HISAR) sensor system, a down-market version of the infrared, optical, and synthetic aperture radar gear Hughes developed for the U-2.

At least some of the current RQ-4 aircraft carry a signals intelligence sensor as well, which can be used to intercept radio transmissions from the ground. The latest generation of RQ-4s (Block 40) will carry an improved radar system called the Multi-Platform Radar Technology Insertion Program (MP-RTIP), which can both provide synthetic aperture radar imaging of the ground below and track multiple moving targets.

SecurityWeek covers snitches in unsuspected places, including those “smart” household thermostats, refrigerators, and suchlike:

The Massive Challenge of Securing the Internet of Things

If the buzz last year was all about software defined networking (SDN), this year’s buzz is about the Internet of Things – everyday devices that are IP-enabled, can communicate over the Internet and can transmit what may be very confidential and important data. In fact, according to data from Cisco, there are now more “things” connected to the Internet than there are people on Earth, and these “things” are not just smartphones and tablets. For example, a Dutch startup, Sparked, is using wireless sensors on cattle so that when one of them is sick or pregnant, it sends a message to the farmer.

While devices that are used in the Internet of Things (IoT) can address either consumer or enterprise needs, its use within enterprises and critical infrastructure such as manufacturing plants or transportation hubs may pose the biggest security risks, and the biggest targets for criminal organizations and nation states.

Spiegel covers a covert blast from the past starring some nasty Nazi volk:

Files Uncovered: Nazi Veterans Created Illegal Army

Newly discovered documents show that in the years after World War II, former members of the Nazi Wehrmacht and Waffen-SS formed a secret army to protect the country from the Soviets. The illegal project could have sparked a major scandal at the time.

For nearly six decades, the 321-page file lay unnoticed in the archives of the BND, Germany’s foreign intelligence agency — but now its contents have revealed a new chapter of German postwar history that is as spectacular as it is mysterious.

The previously secret documents reveal the existence of a coalition of approximately 2,000 former officers — veterans of the Nazi-era Wehrmacht and the Waffen-SS — who decided to put together an army in postwar Germany in 1949. They made their preparations without a mandate from the German government, without the knowledge of the parliament and, the documents show, by circumventing Allied occupation forces.

Independent.ie has Irish police behaving badly:

Doctor: ‘Special needs boy was stripped naked and whipped with belt in garda custody’

A RETIRED doctor has claimed a “special needs boy” was stripped naked and whipped with his own belt in Garda custody.

Dr Richard O’Flaherty told the Oireachtas Justice Committee the 17-year-old was arrested after he borrowed his father’s car.

He said the young man was arrested by gardai who took off his clothes and beat him while he was detained.

Dr O’Flaherty was speaking at an Oireachtas hearing on proposed changes to the Garda Siochana Act.

Relatively good news, at least for one state, from MintPress News:

Minn. Closer To Stopping “Policing For Profit”

Starting in August, police in Minnesota will no longer be able to seize property from people suspected of — but not charged with — criminal involvement.

Starting Aug. 1, new legislation goes into effect in Minnesota that will stop law enforcement from seizing a person’s property — including cash, stocks, real estate, vehicles, guns, cars and homes — if that person is only suspected of being involved with wrongdoing or crime.

Under the bipartisan supported legislation, Minnesota will soon require law enforcement to first convict an individual, or require the property owner to plead guilty to a crime or become an informant, in order for law enforcement to be able to seize that individual’s property under civil forfeiture rules.

The new law also shifts the burden of proof onto the government. Previously, those who had their property taken away under civil forfeiture practices had to prove that their property was not used in, or obtained through any illegal activity.

After the jump, a host of stories for the increasingly accelerating Game of Zones, including massive violence in Vietnam, a whole lot of serious saber-rattling, and a whole lot more. . . Continue reading

Headlines II: Spooks, shockers, zones, drones


A lot to cover and little time to write, so onward.

From the Guardian, an Old Blighty hack alert:

Privacy is at risk owing to basic security failures, warns information regulator

  • Organisations are told that missed software updates and poor password management lead to same breaches being repeat

British people’s privacy is being put in danger because organisations are failing to get rudimentary security right, the information commissioner’s office warned on Monday.

In a review of the breaches reported to the privacy regulator, the ICO uncovered some common basic errors that led to data breaches, including failing to update software and poor password management.

“It’s the same sort of breaches occurring again and again,” the ICO’s group manager for technology Simon Rice told The Guardian.

Techdirt covers the latest form The Most Transparent Administration in History™:

The Government’s Antipathy Towards Transparency Has Made FOIA Lawsuits The Default Process

  • from the gov’t-resorting-more-and-more-to-‘make-me’-response dept

This is default mode for the Freedom of Information Act.

In a federal FOIA complaint, the ACLU and University of Arizona Professor Derek Bambauer and Associate Professor Jane Yakowitz Bambauer claim that the Department of Homeland Security has failed to respond to requests made in January and February for records that may “shed light on Border Patrol’s extensive but largely opaque interior enforcement operations.”

The professors seek “records related to U.S. Border Patrol’s interior enforcement operations in Tucson and Yuma Sectors, including relevant agency policies, stop data, and complaint records.”

From Spain, the panopticon extends its reach, via El País:

Government to create database for monitoring all Spanish bank accounts

  • Measure aimed at combating money laundering and terrorism funding
  • But experts fear new system could be used as a political weapon

The government is creating a massive database to monitor the banking activities of everyone living in Spain, with the goal of fighting money laundering and funding for terrorist activities.

Judges, prosecutors, police officers, intelligence agents and the Tax Agency will have access to the 34 million bank accounts, assets and deposit accounts included in this database.

This is the first time that the financial activities of all Spaniards and residents have become the targets of such a program. France and Germany are the only other European countries to have adopted the system.

Another disturbing alert, this time from Medill News Service:

Medical devices could fall prey to computer malfunctions, hackers

As more and more medical devices and hospital equipment become connected to the Internet or networks, they may become lucrative targets for cyber-criminals or hackers trying either to harm the users or make points about their own technological skills.

“The health care industry is not technically prepared to combat against cyber-criminals’ basic cyber intrusion tactics,” an April report from the cyber division of the FBI says. It also says the industry “is not as resilient to cyber intrusions compared to the financial and retail sectors, therefore the possibility of increased cyber intrusions is likely.”

Experts also are worried about the potentially deadly consequences of unsecured systems being violated accidentally. As people become more dependent on medical devices that share information, the chance increases that their codes could be scrambled, causing malfunctions.

Wired hedges a bet:

Obama: NSA Must Reveal Bugs Like Heartbleed, Unless They Help the NSA

After years of studied silence on the government’s secret and controversial use of security vulnerabilities, the White House has finally acknowledged that the NSA and other agencies exploit some of the software holes they uncover, rather than disclose them to vendors to be fixed.

The acknowledgement comes in a news report indicating that President Obama decided in January that from now on any time the NSA discovers a major flaw in software, it must disclose the vulnerability to vendors and others so that it can be patched, according to the New York Times.

But Obama included a major loophole in his decision, which falls far short of recommendations made by a presidential review board last December: According to Obama, any flaws that have “a clear national security or law enforcement” use can be kept secret and exploited.

And the first in a series of headlines with a common theme, first from the Guardian:

Glenn Greenwald: how the NSA tampers with US-made internet routers

The NSA has been covertly implanting interception tools in US servers heading overseas – even though the US government has warned against using Chinese technology for the same reasons, says Glenn Greenwald, in an extract from his new book about the Snowden affair, No Place to Hide

For years, the US government loudly warned the world that Chinese routers and other internet devices pose a “threat” because they are built with backdoor surveillance functionality that gives the Chinese government the ability to spy on anyone using them. Yet what the NSA’s documents show is that Americans have been engaged in precisely the activity that the US accused the Chinese of doing.

From the Japan Times, eyes and ears turn East:

Book on whistleblower Snowden details U.S. spying on Japan

A Japanese edition of the book titled “No Place to Hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA, and the U.S. Surveillance State” and written by Glenn Greenwald, a former columnist with The Guardian newspaper, will hit bookstores in Japan on Wednesday after its worldwide release Tuesday.

The book says the NSA surveilled entities including the permanent mission of Japan to the United Nations in 2010 before the U.N. Security Council adopted a resolution on sanctions against Iran.

The U.S. used various methods, including hacking, to obtain information from Japan’s U.N. mission, the book says. Japan was one of the nonpermanent members of the UNSC at the time.

It also says the NSA placed bugs and hacked more than 50,000 computers in Japan and other countries, allowing it to see the words typed and the messages on the screens.

The Guardian again, with a Greenwald alert:

Glenn Greenwald: ‘I don’t trust the UK not to arrest me. Their behaviour has been extreme’

He has been lauded and vilified in equal measure. But did the journalist’s ‘outsider’ status help him land Edward Snowden’s NSA revelations? Why did he nearly miss the story? And how powerless did he feel when his partner was detained at Heathrow? One year after the scoop, we meet him in his jungle paradise in Rio

“I don’t trust them not to detain me, interrogate me and even arrest me. Their behaviour has been so extreme and offensive, and the political and media class was so supportive of it, that I feel uncomfortable with the entire atmosphere,” says Greenwald.

He insists he has never had animosity towards Britain. “But the more I’ve learned, the more troubling it has become.”

His new book, No Place to Hide, begins with Greenwald’s account of how, together with Poitras and the Guardian, he broke what may well be the story of the decade. The funny thing, as he recalls, is how close it came to never happening. This seems a good place to start our conversation when we meet down at sea level in the bustling heart of Rio.

From CNBC, duh:

NSA chief: US spy agency saw changed behavior after Snowden

Foreign governments, individuals and groups targeted by the U.S. National Security Agency for intelligence collection have changed their “behavior” following disclosures by former agency contractor Edward Snowden, the NSA’s new chief said on Monday.

“They’re changing the way they communicate,” said Admiral Mike Rogers, who became NSA’s new director last month following the retirement of U.S. Army General Keith Alexander. Rogers was speaking to the Reuters Cybersecurity Summit in Washington.

Rogers strongly condemned Snowden, who after fleeing to Hong Kong accepted an offer of asylum in Russia last year.

Salon hints at things to come:

Glenn Greenwald on Snowden docs: I’m saving the best for last

  • The Pulitzer Prize-winner talks Snowden, the “banal” Hillary Clinton, and why Tim Russert is so vastly overrated

TheLocakl.de takes us to Germany and a big bill:

Spy base will cost €1 billion (and it’s late)

The budget is not enough – Germany’s new spy headquarters is costing hundreds of millions of euros more than expected – and it’s late.

The cost of the huge new secret service complex in central Berlin has already risen to almost €1 billion, and is expected to tip over the billion mark.

The new home of the Bundesnachrichtendienst (BND) – Germany’s equivalent of the CIA in the US, or Britain’s MI6 – was supposed to be finished by 2013, at a cost of €720 million.

One part opened earlier this year, but Der Spiegel magazine reported on Monday that the spy base had joined Germany’s long list of flagship building projects which are late and over-budget.

Der Spiegel said the latest budget estimate of €912 million would not be enough to finish building the complex which has 260,000 square metres of office space. An internal government report seen by Der Spiegel put the cost at €1.034 billion.

After the jump, beaucoup stories from the Game of Drones and the ongoing, always portentous Asian Game of Zones. . . Continue reading

Headlines II: Spies, pols, hacks, zones, threats


Today’s tales from the dark side covers the gamut from political maneuvering in Washington, propaganda pols, and the latest and occasionally bizarre developments in the ever-growing area in which the Asian Game of Zones continues, rhetoric spiraling ever upward.

Defense One Today gives us our first security item, weaving together two critical threads of political discourse and debate:

How Climate Change Affects Terrorism

According to the Obama Administration’s newly released National Climate Assessment, climate change is already impacting communities in every corner of the country, with an increasing frequency and severity of extreme weather events – storms, floods, and droughts – and rising sea levels destabilizing the everyday lives of Americans.

Worse, the impacts of these changes are accelerating, and they are affecting communities around the world. The Pentagon’s most recent Quadrennial Defense Review warns that “climate change may increase the frequency, scale and complexity of future missions.” Some of the least stable states in the world will face changing weather patterns that reduce arable land and fresh-water supplies, in turn driving mass-migration, provoking resource conflicts, and fostering global health threats.

From PCWorld, an espiometastasis:

Department of Justice wants expanded permission to hack and search remote computers

The U.S. Department of Justice wants new authority to hack and search remote computers during investigations, saying the new rules are needed because of complex criminal schemes sometimes using millions of machines spread across the country.

Digital rights groups say the request from the DOJ for authority to search computers outside the district where an investigation is based raises concerns about Internet security and Fourth Amendment protections against unreasonable searches and seizures.

“By expanding federal law enforcement’s power to secretly exploit ‘zero-day’ vulnerabilities in software and Internet platforms, the proposal threatens to weaken Internet security for all of us,” Nathan Freed Wessler, a staff attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union, said by email.

From IDG News Service, an attack compounded by errors:

Rush to fight Heartbleed leads to errors with certificates and patches

  • Some reissued SSL certificates use the same vulnerable key as the ones they replace, and some sites moved to a vulnerable version of OpenSSL

Despite taking prompt action to defend against the Heartbleed attack, some sites are no better off than before — and in some cases, they are much worse off.

Many of the sites that patched vulnerable OpenSSL installations after the Heartbleed attack was revealed on April 7 then went on to revoke compromised SSL certificates and order new ones. But 30,000 sites are now using replacements based on the same compromised private key as the old certificate, according to a study by Internet services company Netcraft released Friday.

That means that anyone who managed to steal the private key of such a server before it was patched could still use the key to impersonate the server in a man-in-the-middle attack, even with the new certificate in place.

IntelNews tries to repair a rickety bridge:

Efforts to restore US-German intelligence cooperation collapse

Negotiations aimed at restoring the intelligence relationship between America and Germany, following revelations last year that Washington spied on the communications of German leaders, collapsed before German Chancellor Angela Merkel met US President Barack Obama last week.

The two leaders had planned to make a public statement during Mrs. Merkel’s official visit to Washington last Friday, announcing a new intelligence agreement between their respective countries. But the announcement was never made, as Ukraine dominated the political agenda.

IntelNews readers will recall the dramatic way in which Germany and the United States fell out in October of last year, after American intelligence defector Edward Snowden revealed an invasive intelligence-gathering operation by the US National Security Agency (NSA). The program targeted the private communications of senior German officials, including those of Mrs. Merkel, for nearly a decade.

From MintPress News, heading to court:

NSA Bulk Phone Records Collection Cases Edge Toward Supreme Court

  • The plaintiffs vary, but their complaint is largely the same: the NSA overstepped its bounds and illegally collected their phone records and metadata.

At first glance, a San Diego cab driver serving 18 years in prison for conspiring to provide material support to a terrorist group has little in common with members of the First Unitarian Church of Los Angeles.

But both Basaaly Moalin and church members claim the National Security Agency illegally intruded on their electronic communications as part of its bulk telephone metadata collection program that was exposed last year by whistleblower Edward Snowden.

In February 2013, a San Diego federal jury convicted Moalin and three other immigrants from Somalia of sending money back to their homeland to fund the al-Shabab group. After the Guardian newspaper published Snowden’s revelations in June, Moalin asked for a new trial, saying the NSA’s surveillance violated his First and Fourth Amendment rights.

From the Guardian, rare candor and honesty?:

MPs: Snowden files are ‘embarrassing indictment’ of British spying oversight

  • All-party committee demands reforms to make security and intelligence services accountable in wake of disclosures

Edward Snowden’s disclosures of the scale of mass surveillance are “an embarrassing indictment” of the weak nature of the oversight and legal accountability of Britain’s security and intelligence agencies, MPs have concluded.

A highly critical report by the Commons home affairs select committee published on Friday calls for a radical reform of the current system of oversight of MI5, MI6 and GCHQ, arguing that the current system is so ineffective it is undermining the credibility of the intelligence agencies and parliament itself.

The MPs say the current system was designed in a pre-internet age when a person’s word was accepted without question. “It is designed to scrutinise the work of George Smiley, not the 21st-century reality of the security and intelligence services,” said committee chairman, Keith Vaz. “The agencies are at the cutting edge of sophistication and are owed an equally refined system of democratic scrutiny. It is an embarrassing indictment of our system that some in the media felt compelled to publish leaked information to ensure that matters were heard in parliament.”

Al Jazeera America carries on a proud Bush tradition:

New documents point to CIA rendition network through Djibouti

New evidence culled from a court case involving CIA contractors has revealed flight paths through Djibouti that appear to indicate the country’s role as a hub of the CIA’s rendition network in Africa, according to documents released by the U.K.-based human rights group Reprieve and New York University’s Global Justice Clinic.

The documents could support the case of Mohammad al-Asad, a former CIA detainee who is suing the government of Djibouti for its alleged role in hosting CIA “black sites” – specifically the one where he says he was detained and tortured for two weeks between Dec. 2003 and Jan. 2004. A Senate investigation into the agency’s “detention and interrogation program” had previously confirmed that several individuals had in fact been detained in Djibouti, according to two officials who read the still-classified report and who spoke to Al Jazeera.

Investigators behind the document release combed through contracts, invoices and letters put into evidence for a court case – which involved CIA contractors and was separate from the Djibouti allegations – and pieced together a series of rendition circuits, or flight paths, between 2003 and 2004. They include legs through Djibouti – even though the Horn of Africa did not appear to be a convenient stopover between the United States and Afghanistan, the circuits’ endpoints.

From the Irish Times, dramatic evidence of police corruption on the Emerald Isle:

Guerin report finds Shatter, gardaí failed to adequately investigate whistleblower claims

  • Barrister calls for comprehensive commission of investigation into claims of corruption and malpractice

An Garda Síochána and former minister for justice Alan Shatter failed in their duties to properly investigate allegations of corruption and malpractice in the force, barrister Sean Guerin has said in his report to the Government.

In his 300-page report on a dossier of claims handed in by garda whistleblower Sgt Maurice McCabe, Mr Guerin finds there is cause for concern about the adequacy of investigations into matters raised by Sgt McCabe.

The report vindicates Sgt McCabe.

And Kathimerini English, Grecian corruption:

Policeman accused of running escort service

A policeman was among four people arrested on Friday in connection with an escort agency in Athens.

The officer, reportedly a member of the security police, ran a website offering to arrange dates with female escorts who also had sex with their clients.

Another man and two women were arrested. The policeman was suspended and an internal investigation was ordered.

More of the same on the Iberian Peninsula from thinkSPAIN:

A fine verdict for the Guardia Civil: Bonuses linked to number of traffic sanctions issued ruled ‘illegal’

GUARDIA Civil officers in Spain have won their battle against ‘company’ rules which meant their bonuses were affected by how many traffic fines they dished out.

The Summary of Individual Activities brought in four years ago by the force’s top management linked officers’ extra pay – a significant portion of their take-home earnings which is added to their basic salary – would be increased or decreased on a ‘points’ basis linked to their performance.

And one of the performance indicators was the ‘level of service’ provided when they are on traffic duty, within which was included a direct connection between bonus payments and numbers of parking or driving fines issued.

The Guardian covers domestic insecurity closer to home:

Violence erupts again in Mexican state where drug wars began

  • Top detective among latest of around 80 people killed since April in Tamaulipas state, after new crackdown on criminal groups

A spate of extreme violence in Mexico’s north-eastern Tamaulipas state has ended the relative calm in the region where the country’s drug wars began.

Officials say about 80 people have been killed in almost daily street battles. This week the state’s top detective, Salvador de Haro Muñoz, was among five people killed in a shootout. Ten police officers have been arrested for allegedly leading him into an ambush.

Fourteen people were killed in one day this month in a string of gun battles between federal forces and unidentified gunmen in the city of Reynosa, across the border from McAllen, Texas.

From El País, crime and no punishment:

Why 95% of cybercrimes committed in Spain are going unpunished

  • Ministry report into digital offenses highlights dangers to society, the economy and infrastructure

Around 95 percent of cybercrimes, or offenses related to new technologies, are going unpunished in Spain, according to a new report from the Interior Ministry. “The phenomenon of cybercrime is of significant international and national importance, not only for the threat it represents to society, but also for the dangers it poses to the economy and key infrastructure,” reads the report.

Over the last year, Spain’s security forces received 42,437 complaints for sexual offenses, fraud, forgery, threats, scams, and illegal interception of emails. Of these cases, only 2,167 have been resolved. The Interior Ministry admits that this is a very low percentage, “compared to police successes in criminal cases (37 percent) or robberies and theft (23.9 percent).”

The speed, anonymity and ease of opportunity that new technologies offer are encouraging criminals to attack computer systems to illegally remove data, as well as stealing individuals’ identities, engaging in activities related to pederasty, phishing (posing as a bank or other reputable institution to acquire sensitive information), and sending out viruses and malware. The global reach of these criminals has alarmed governments around the world, which have responded by introducing new laws. One such example is the Budapest Cybercrime Convention of 2001, to which Spain signed up in 2010.

After the jump, the latest, sometimes astounding, developments in the ever-escalating Asian Game of Zones. . . Continue reading

Headlines II: Tales from the dark side


From the world of spies, lies, drones, hacks, and more.

For our first headline, this from the McClatchy Washington Bureau:

Despite Senate hopes of speedy release, CIA torture report won’t be made public for months

The release of the long-awaited Senate Intelligence Committee report on the CIA’s use of waterboarding and other interrogation techniques — widely denounced as torture — is certain to take much longer than the 30 days sought by Senate Democrats.

The panel’s chairwoman, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., said at the beginning of April that she hoped the CIA would complete by now the process of excising from the report information deemed harmful to national security.

The procedure, however, likely will take months, several experts said. That’s because it’s complex and time-consuming. Not only does the CIA have to review information that came from its archives, but other U.S. intelligence agencies as well as the Pentagon and the State Department have to evaluate material that they provided, they said.

Reuters delivers a glass of whine:

Snowden leaks prompt ‘insidious’ claims about spies: UK lawmaker

Supporters of former U.S. intelligence contractor Edward Snowden use “insidious” language that blurs lines between spying in democratic and authoritarian states, a senior British lawmaker said on Thursday.

Malcolm Rifkind, chairman of parliament’s Intelligence and Security Committee which oversees the work of Britain’s spy agencies, said their staff had “noble motivations” and no desire to be “all-seeing” or “all-hearing”. . .

“Unfortunately, the insidious use of language such as ‘mass surveillance’ and ‘Orwellian’ by many of Mr. Snowden’s supporters to describe the actions of Western agencies blurs, unforgivably, the distinction between a system that uses the state to protect the people, and one that uses the state to protect itself against the people,” Rifkind said.

Deutsche Welle covers a coming hearing — or not:

German NSA investigative panel to allow Snowden to testify

NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden is to testify before a German panel investigating the activities of the spy agency. However, the panel has not yet determined whether he may travel to Berlin for the hearing.

The parliamentary committee, comprised of representatives from Germany’s four parties in the Bundestag, announced the decision on Thursday after deliberating over the matter for roughly two hours.

The vote was unanimous, according to Martina Renner, the chairperson of Germany’s Left party for the special committee.

Lawmakers involved the formal inquiry of NSA activities did not decide on Thursday, however, where the long-awaited hearing would take place.

Meanwhile, the ex-top eavesdropper has taken a spin in the revolving door. From Politico:

Ex-NSA chief Keith Alexander seeks post-Snowden second act

Former National Security Agency chief Gen. Keith Alexander is launching a consulting firm for financial institutions looking to address cybersecurity threats, POLITICO has learned.

Less than two months since his retirement from the embattled agency at the center of the Edward Snowden leak storm, the retired four-star general is setting up a Washington-based operation that will try to attract clients based on his four decades of experience in the military and intelligence — and the continued levels of access to senior decision-makers that affords.

“He’s already out pushing hard,” said an industry source recently briefed by Alexander on the new business venture. “He’s cleared. If something does pop, he can get in the door and get a briefing. That’s part of his stock and trade.”

North of the border, and more snoopery from CBC News:

Chantal Bernier says Ottawa snooping on social media

  • Privacy commissioner urges government to clarify rules for when and where data can be collected

Federal government departments are collecting data on Canadian citizens via their social media accounts for no good reason, Canada’s privacy watchdog says.

In a letter to Treasury Board president Tony Clement in February, interim privacy commissioner Chantal Bernier says “we are seeing evidence that personal information is being collected by government institutions from social media sites without regard for accuracy, currency and accountability.”

The letter dated Feb. 13th also reads: “Should information culled from these sites be used to make administrative decisions about individuals, it is incumbent upon government institutions to ensure the accuracy of this information.”

The letter is just the latest example of how Canada’s chief privacy watchdog has raised a red flag about troubling gaps in the security of Canadians’ personal information.

South of the border, lawmakers also fret, as BuzzFeed reports:

Democratic Congressman Worries About NSA Having Access To Phone Calls With His Hypothetical Mistress

  • Democratic Rep. Jerrold Nadler of New York was speaking at the House Judiciary Committee mark-up of the USA Freedom Act which would end the bulk collection of Americans’ communications records, when he commented on metadata being able to show calls to a “mistress if I had one.” “You can learn a lot from metadata about a person and invade his privacy tremendously.”

From the Independent, and, like, they’re surprised?:

US accuses Israel of ‘alarming, even terrifying’ levels of spying

Friends do not spy on friends. That illusion about America’s attitude to its allies was conclusively debunked by Edward Snowden’s revelations about America’s National Security Agency and its British partner in global electronic eavesdropping, GCHQ. But by every account, the US is being repaid in kind by one of its closest international friends – Israel.

Israel has been trying to steal secrets from the US, its principal protector and benefactor, but also occasional rival, ever since the inception of the Jewish state in 1948, and even before. But according to the latest issue of Newsweek, quoting Obama administration officials, these activities have “crossed red lines” rarely encountered in the past.

In the words of one Congressional aide, with access to classified briefings in January on the subject, Israel’s behaviour was “very sobering…alarming…even terrifying”. Israel, it would appear, is after everything it can lay its hands on: not just diplomatic and policy documents, but industrial and military technology. The means include Israeli trade missions to the US, joint ventures between Israeli and American companies and, presumably, spying by Israeli intelligence agencies.

Quartz recruits [and they’re, like, surprised?]:

China and the US are racing to turn poor, naive Millennials into spies

Chinese state media are accusing an “unnamed foreign country” of recruiting spies at Chinese universities and through popular blogs and social media. This week, a series of news reports claim that unsuspecting Chinese, some of them as young as 16 years old, are being lured into working for foreign intelligence agents.

The reports seem to be a response to a short documentary posted by the US Federal Bureau of Investigations last month, telling the story of a 28-year-old Michigan native, Glenn Duffie Shriver who says he was was recruited to spy for the Chinese while living in Shanghai, and was eventually caught by US authorities. The FBI video describes Chinese intelligence officers plying the young American with cash and luxury liquor, and appealing to his fascination with China.

The fact that this kind of covert recruitment occurs isn’t as surprising as each government’s attempts to paint the other as emotionally manipulative and ruthless. It may be a sign that US and Chinese intelligence agencies are waging a war for public opinion, as well as critical information.

From the Guardian, a non-disappearing act:

Regulators reprimand Snapchat over false claims about messaging service

  • Company had promised messages ‘disappear forever’
  • FTC says Snapchat deceived over personal data collection

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) said on Thursday that the fast-growing service had deceived people about the privacy of the messages sent through its service and secretly collected sensitive information about its users.

According to Snapchat, this month users are sending 700m photos and videos per day. Snapchat messages, known as snaps, are timed to delete after they have been viewed and it has become a popular service for people “sexting” – sending pornographic photos and texts – as well as for people wanting greater privacy from their messaging services.

The FTC said that in marketing the service Snapchat failed to disclose the ease with which users can save a message by taking an undetectable screenshot or by using a third-party app. Apps allowing snap recipients to copy and store messages indefinitely have been downloaded “millions of times”, said the FTC. Despite a security researcher warning the company about this possibility, the FTC said, “Snapchat continued to misrepresent that the sender controls how long a recipient can view a snap.”

The Guardian again, with questions about domestic security:

Albuquerque residents attempt citizen’s arrest of police chief

  • Protests against police brutality cause rowdy city council meeting to end with attempted citizen’s arrest of controversial chief

As the threat of another tense standoff at an Albuquerque city council meeting brews, protesters angry over a series of police shootings are harkening back to the city’s long history of civil disturbance and modeling their demonstrations after those including a notorious 1960s citizen raid of a northern New Mexico courthouse.

In 1967, protesters contending the US government stole millions of acres of land from Mexican American residents stormed a courthouse to attempt a citizen’s arrest of the district attorney. During the raid, the group shot and wounded a state police officer and jailer, beat a deputy and took the sheriff and a reporter hostage.

Now a leader of this week’s protest cited that episode as the motivation for the city council demonstration in which protesters attempted a citizen’s arrest of the police chief.

Here’s a video report from station KRQE in Albuquerque:

Protesters take over Albuquerque City Council meeting

Program notes:

Angry protesters took over Albuquerque City Council Monday night calling for immediate change at APD and the ousting of both Albuquerque’s Police Chief, Mayor and more.

BBC News covers criminalized blogging, the venue not so surprising:

Saudi blogger Raif Badawi gets 10 year jail sentence

A Saudi court has imprisoned blogger Raif Badawi for 10 years for “insulting Islam” and setting up a liberal web forum, local media report. He was also sentenced to 1,000 lashes and ordered to pay a fine of 1 million riyals ($266,000; £133,000).

Amnesty International called the verdict “outrageous” and urged the authorities to quash the verdict.

Mr Badawi, the co-founder of a website called the Liberal Saudi Network, was arrested in 2012.

From TheLocal.se, flying high to spy high, oops:

SAS flight in Russian spy plane near miss

A Scandinavian Airlines flight had to take last minute evasive action to avoid colliding with a Russian spy plane just off the Swedish south coast in March, according to a report which emerged on Thursday.

According to a Sveriges Television report on Thursday, the incident occurred on March 3rd just 50 kilometres south of the Swedish city of Malmö – home to over 300,000 people.

The plane was reportedly a Russian Ilyushin 20m military aircraft used for signals surveillance. The two aircraft are reported to have passed by each other a mere 90 metres apart.

From Guardian, criminal stupidity?:

FBI agent faces charges in Pakistan for boarding a flight with weapons

  • US State Department confirms that Joel Cox is federal agent and says Pakistani authorities are co-ordinating to resolve arrest

A FBI agent arrested in Pakistan for trying to board a civilian flight with bullets and a knife in his luggage is being investigated on possible criminal charges, Pakistani authorities said on Thursday.

Joel Cox, confirmed by the US State Department as an FBI agent, was arrested on Sunday at the airport in the southern city of Karachi after trying to board a flight with the knife and 15 9mm bullets in his luggage, police said.

The case has revived memories of Raymond Davis, an American CIA contractor who was arrested in January 2011 after shooting dead two men he believed were about to rob him in the eastern city of Lahore.

After the jump, the latest from the ongoing Asian Game of Zones, including drones, a ship-ramming China/Vietnam engagement and sundry responses, history wars, Japanese remilitarization, and more. . .
Continue reading

Headlines: Spies, drones, crops, & zones


We open today’s tales from the darkside with a qualified win with PCWorld:

House votes to outlaw NSA’s bulk collection of phone records

A U.S. House of Representatives committee has taken a major step toward outlawing the NSA’s controversial bulk collection of telephone and other business records generated by U.S. residents.

The House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday voted 32-0 to approve an amended version of the USA Freedom Act, a bill that would require the National Security Agency to get case-by-case approval from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court before collecting the telephone or business records of a U.S. resident. The committee’s vote sends the bill to the House floor; a similar bill is awaiting action in the Senate Judiciary Committee.

The bill would limit the controversial bulk collection program by allowing the FBI, asking on behalf of the NSA, to request U.S. phone records from carriers only if there are “reasonable grounds” to believe that the information sought pertains to a foreign power, an agent of a foreign power, or a person in contact with a foreign power.

From McClatchy Washington Bureau, job security:

Border Patrol rarely punishes agents accused of abuse, study shows

A new report by an immigration watchdog finds that the United States’ largest federal law enforcement agency rarely punishes its agents for their mistreatment of immigrants and American citizens.

The report by the American Immigration Council found that 97 percent of abuse complaints lodged against Border Patrol agents and Customs and Border Protection officers resulted in no disciplinary action once an investigation had been completed. Those included a complaint from a pregnant woman in El Paso, Texas, that she had miscarried after a Border Patrol agent kicked her in the stomach, and several complaints from women that they had been forced to bare their breasts while in custody.

The survey also found that many complaints against U.S. border agents take years to resolve. The council reviewed 809 complaints filed in the three years from January 2009 to January 2012. But of those, only 485 had been investigated and resolved. The remainder are still under investigation, including a nearly 5-year-old allegation of forced sexual intercourse lodged July 30, 2009, against a Border Patrol agent in El Centro, Calif.

From the Progressive, thug politics:

Obama Threatens Pulitzer Prize-Winner

James Risen, a Pulitzer Prize-winner at the New York Times, may face jail time on a federal contempt of court charge if he doesn’t release the identity of one of his confidential sources.

The Bush Administration’s Justice Department tried to pry the information out of him, but ultimately relented.

Now President Obama, who vowed to restore our civil liberties when he ran for the White House in 2000, is letting his Justice Department pursue Risen even more aggressively than Bush did.

The information concerns a source for a chapter in Risen’s terrific 2006 book, “State of War: The Secret History of the CIA and the Bush Administration.” That chapter dealt with a scheme to give the Iranians faulty blueprints for a nuclear weapon.

Major mud-slinging from Reuters:

Snowden being manipulated by Russian intelligence: ex-NSA chief

Former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, who revealed the U.S. government’s data collection programs, is now likely under the control of Russian intelligence agencies, according to former NSA Director, General Keith Alexander.

Alexander, who retired on March 31, made the comments in an interview with The Australian Financial Review newspaper to be published on Thursday, a transcript of which was made available to Reuters ahead of publication.

Alexander, the longest-serving Director of the NSA, also spoke in favor of backing Japanese militarization to counter-balance China and warned that a lack of norms governing cyber-conflict could trigger a war between traditional foes like North and South Korea.

From Defense One, provoking the bear:

GOP: Speed Up Missile Interceptors to Poland

Senate Republicans are pushing for the U.S. military to speed up deployment of advanced interceptors in Poland to send a deterrent message to Russia.

A bill introduced last week by Senator Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) and 22 other GOP members of his chamber would require the Obama administration to provide a plan for how to achieve deployment of Phase 3 of the “Phased Adaptive Approach” for European missile defense by the end of 2016.

Antimissile assets under the third phase currently are not planned for fielding in Poland until late 2018, at the earliest.

BuzzFeed plays space invaders:

CNN Actually Asked People In A Scientific Poll If They Thought Space Aliens Abducted MH370

  • Welcome to Earth.

A CNN/ORC poll released Wednesday showed 80% of Americans think no one survived Malaysia Airlines flight 370.

In one portion of their write up of the poll CNN states Americans think aliens might have been involved in the disappearance: “…while 9% believe that space aliens or beings from another dimension were involved.”

From Channel NewsAsia Singapore, with friends like these. . .:

Israeli spying on US at alarming level: report

Israel spies on the United States more than any other ally does and these activities have reached an alarming level, Newsweek magazine reported on Tuesday.

The main targets are US industrial and technical secrets, the weekly said, quoting classified briefings on legislation that would make it easier for Israeli citizens to get visas to enter America.

Newsweek said a congressional staffer familiar with a briefing last January called the testimony “very sobering … alarming … even terrifying”, and quoted another as saying the behaviour was “damaging.”

“No other country close to the United States continues to cross the line on espionage like the Israelis do,” said a former congressional staffer who attended another classified briefing in late 2013, according to Newsweek.

Wired threat level builds up the hackable files:

Former NSA Chief Defends Stockpiling Software Flaws for Spying

The NSA has never said much about the open secret that it collects and sometimes even pays for information about hackable flaws in commonly used software. But in a rare statement following his retirement last month, former NSA chief Keith Alexander acknowledged and defended that practice. In doing so, he admitted the deeply contradictory responsibilities of an agency tasked with defending Americans’ security and simultaneously hoarding bugs in software they use every day.

“When the government asks NSA to collect intelligence on terrorist X, and he uses publicly available tools to encode his messages, it is not acceptable for a foreign intelligence agency like NSA to respond, ‘Sorry we cannot understand what he is saying’,” Alexander told the Australian Financial Review, which he inexplicably granted a 16,000-word interview. “To ask NSA not to look for weaknesses in the technology that we use, and to not seek to break the codes our adversaries employ to encrypt their messages is, I think, misguided. I would love to have all the terrorists just use that one little sandbox over there so that we could focus on them. But they don’t.”

The NSA has been widely criticized for using its knowledge of security flaws for spying, rather than working to patch those flaws and make internet users more secure. Alexander’s defense of the practice boils down to the notion that separating friend and foe when seeking to break codes has become a nearly impossible task.

From the Guardian, his career lives up to his name:

Ireland’s justice minister resigns over allegations by police whistleblower

  • Alan Shatter steps down after claims of corruption within the police force and political interference in policing

Ireland’s justice minister has resigned over a critical report concerning allegations by a police whistleblower.

Alan Shatter offered his resignation to the Irish premier, Enda Kenny.

In response to the report into the Garda whistleblower’s claims of corruption within the force and political interference in policing, Shatter sent a letter to the taoiseach stating: “I am anxious that any controversy that may arise on publication of the report does not distract from the important work of government or create any difficulties for the Fine Gael or Labour parties in the period leading into the … elections.”

The London Telegraph makes a claim:

Abu Hamza ‘secretly worked for MI5′ to ‘keep streets of London safe’

  • Radical Islamic preacher helped police and British intelligence ‘defuse tensions with the Muslim community’, his lawyer claims

Abu Hamza, the radical Islamic preacher notorious for his hate-filled sermons, was in reality working secretly with British intelligence “to keep the streets of London safe” by “cooling hotheads”, his lawyer claimed in a US court.

Holding up what he said were reports from Scotland Yard, Joshua Dratel described the cleric as an “intermediary” who cooperated with MI5 and the police to try to end foreign hostage-takings and defuse tensions with the Muslim community in Britain.

The extraordinary admission will fuel conspiracy theories that he was allowed to preach hatred without arrest for so long in the UK because he was working with the security authorities.

And from RT, a hack attack:

Over 1 million people hit as hackers attack France’s telecom Orange

Personal data of 1.3 million clients of the French telecommunications corporation Orange have been stolen. The hack includes mobile and land phone numbers, dates of birth and email addresses of the company’s clients.

Orange says the incident was detected over two weeks ago, on April 18. The company did not rush to announce the breach, in order to analyze the scale of the snatched data and work on the security gaps that allowed the information to be stolen.

“The data recovered could be used to contact those concerned by email, SMS or by phone, particularly for phishing purposes,” the group warns in a statement.

The Verge next, chhillin’ in Moscow:

Putin signs law forcing bloggers to register with Russian media office

President Vladimir Putin has signed a law tightening the Russian government’s already strong hold on the internet. Earlier this week, Putin officially passed what’s become known as the “bloggers law,” which requires popular internet writers to follow rules normally reserved for larger media outlets. Under it, any blogger with more than 3,000 readers is required to register with the Roskomnadzor, Russia’s media oversight agency. According to Reporters Without Borders, the law covers not only traditional blogs but microblogs and social networks. In addition to following existing laws, writers will be responsible for fact-checking any information they post and removing any inaccurate comments, and they’re forbidden from harming the reputation of a person or group or using their platform to “hide or falsify information of general interest.”

Aleksey Mitrofanov, head of the State Duma legislative body’s information policies committee, has denied that this law regulates bloggers as a kind of mass media. “Special legal regulation for bloggers is to be introduced,” he told the ITAR-TASS News Agency when the bill passed in April. “It is the other way around, bloggers who have been registered as an online publication are not subject to the operation of that law.” But it apparently strips away one of the most basic elements of blogging: anonymous or pseudonymous publishing. Popular writers will be required to publish their surname, initials, and email address, apparently in addition to registering with the Roskomnadzor. Reporters Without Borders has criticized the law’s wording as vague, and Global Voices notes that if a writer falls below 3,000 readers, they apparently bear the burden of proactively trying to get their name removed from the register. According to ITAR-TASS, individual violators will be fined between 10,000 and 30,000 rubles (roughly $280 to $850 at the current exchange rate), while “legal entities” will face fines of 300,000 rubles or $8,500.

New Europe adds another level of chill, and a HBO ban as well, we presume:

Putin bans F-Word, obscenity in mass culture

A new law signed by Russian President Vladimir Putin will put roubles in the country’s swear jar. The Kremlin chief signed a law on 5 May prohibiting swearing in public performances, including cinema, theater and other forms of art. The law will come into effect on 1 July, and afterwards swearing in films, plays and concerts will incur penalties.

Individuals caught using foul language face a fine of up to $70, while officials can be fined up to $40 and businesses nearly $1,400. They face a higher fine and a three-month suspension of business for repeated offenses. An independent examination will determine what counts as profane language, Itar-tass reported.

Any new film containing obscene language won’t be granted a distribution certificate, so there’s no chance of seeing it at the movie theater.

And copies of books, CDs or films containing swearing can only be distributed in a sealed package labeled “Contains obscene language,” the Kremlin said in a statement.

And from RT, the first of today’s drone stories:

All countries will have drone kill technology in 10 years – report

In just one decade, just about every country in the world will have the means to either build or buy unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) capable of launching missiles at enemy targets, thus dramatically changing the face of warfare.

Despite a track record that is stained with the blood of innocent victims, drone technology is quickly becoming the weapon of choice for militaries around the globe, and it’s too late for the United States – presently the leader in UAV technologies – to stop the rush, according to Defense One, a site devoted to security issues.

Just a few countries now hold membership in the elite drone club, including the US, United Kingdom, Russia, Israel, Iran, Pakistan and China. Other countries, such as South Africa and India, are actively seeking to join. According to the RAND organization, however, another 23 countries “are developing or have developed” armed drones.

And from Defense One, a map featuring those countries in or getting into the armed drone business:

BLOG Drones

Want China Times sees a major new player:

China to lead global drone production in next decade: The Diplomat

China is likely to become the world’s main producer of unmanned aerial vehicles, according to Zachary Keck, the associate editor of the Tokyo-based Diplomat magazine, in an article entitled China to Lead World in Drone Production on May. 2.

A report published by Forecast International, a private market research firm, suggested that the global drone market will more than double in the next ten years. It will grow from US$942 million in 2014 to an annual US$2.3 billion in 2023. Expansion driven by increased costs rather than larger production. The report predicted that annual drone production will begin to decrease in 2017. This number is likely to drop from 1,000 systems this year to roughly 960 systems each year.

The report also stated that the Aviation Industry Corporation of China, a state-owned Chinese defense company will lead the world in UAV production. It said that China can produce about US$5.8 billion worth of UAVs through 2023. This is more than half of the UAVs by value that will be produced during this time period. All of which are likely to be sold to Chinese customers.

The Register covers a clampdown:

Spain clamps down on drones

  • There’s no law to cover them, therefore they’re banned

Spain’s Agencia Estatal de Seguridad Aérea (State Air Security Agency – AESA) has issued a declaration in which it reminds citizens that the commercial or professional use of “drones” is illegal, and that amateur UAV operation is restricted to “authorised areas”.

The document stresses that “the use of remote control aircraft for commercial or professional ends is not allowed, and never has been”.

This includes sending up vehicles for aerial photography, “intelligent agriculture” (examination of crops, etc), any kind of aerial report, checking high-tension power lines or railways, border control, detection of forest fires or reconnaissance over areas affected by natural disasters in order to direct rescue services”.

After the jump, the latest rounds in the game of military, trade and resource zones in Asia, plus a kicker at the end. . . Continue reading

Headlines II: Spies, corps, drones, & zones


Secrets, they’ve got secrets. And spies, and drones, computer hackery — plus the latest chapters of the Game of Zones underway in Asia with transoceanic tentacles. . .

We open with the sad reality from GlobalPost:

Curious about the biggest trade deal in history? Sorry, it’s classified

Governments and big corporations can read the Trans-Pacific Partnership, but not you. Here are 6 ways it could change the world.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership sounds deadly boring.

It’s not.

The potential impact on humanity from this proposed mega-deal is impossible to measure. TPP could bankrupt families in Kansas and enrich them in Kuala Lumpur. Or make patented medicine wildly unaffordable for sick people in poor places. Or even imprison citizens of 12 countries for pirating Game of Thrones episodes.

Or maybe, as its proponents claim, TPP could plug the US into Asia’s rising markets and give the global economy a needed jolt. Either way, if secured, it will be a corporation-friendly game changer for 800 million people.

The thing is, average people are banned from seeing its inner workings.

A different attitude is shaping up in Germany over a parallel trade pact across another ocean, as EurActiv reports:

Schulz on TTIP: There will be no secret negotiations

Instead of trying to cripple negotiations over the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, opponents should participate in talks, said German Economic Affairs Minister Sigmar Gabriel, while top European candidate Martin Schulz declared TTIP a top priority to “regain lost trust”. EurActiv Germany reports.

Ahead of the fifth round of EU-US trade talks on 19 May, Sigmar Gabriel, Germany’s Federal Minister of Economic Affairs, warned globalisation critics and the German Left Party (Die Linke) against fighting the planned Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP).

Instead, he called on them to play a greater role in the talks: Those who refuse to negotiate with the United States, the social democrat said, will not be able to have any influence over the progression of globalisation.  Instead, civil society and NGOs, as well as national parliaments, should actively participate in the dialogue with their positions and help shape the agreement, Gabriel emphasised.

The Guardian pronounces, profitably:

Antivirus software is dead, says security expert at Symantec

  • Information chief at Norton developer says software in general misses 55% of attacks and its future lies in responding to hacks

Antivirus software only catches 45% of malware attacks and is “dead”, according to a senior manager at Symantec.

Remarks by Brian Dye, senior vice-president for information security at the company, which invented commercial antivirus software in the 1980s and now develops and sells Norton Antivirus, suggest that such software leaves users vulnerable.

Dye told the Wall Street Journal that hackers increasingly use novel methods and bugs in the software of computers to perform attacks, resulting in about 55% cyberattacks going unnoticed by commercial antivirus software.

From Al Jazeera America, well who’d’a thunk it?:

Exclusive: Emails reveal close Google relationship with NSA

  • National Security Agency head and Internet giant’s executives have coordinated through high-level policy discussions

Email exchanges between National Security Agency Director Gen. Keith Alexander and Google executives Sergey Brin and Eric Schmidt suggest a far cozier working relationship between some tech firms and the U.S. government than was implied by Silicon Valley brass after last year’s revelations about NSA spying.

Disclosures by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden about the agency’s vast capability for spying on Americans’ electronic communications prompted a number of tech executives whose firms cooperated with the government to insist they had done so only when compelled by a court of law.

But Al Jazeera has obtained two sets of email communications dating from a year before Snowden became a household name that suggest not all cooperation was under pressure.

Crashed and burned with Nextgov:

Pentagon Police Agency Hit by ‘Catastrophic’ Network Outage

The agency that manages the Pentagon Police Department  and also runs networks and computers for the Office of the Secretary of Defense experienced a “catastrophic network technological outage” on Jan. 3, and repairs may not be complete until January 2015, an obscure document on the Federal Business Opportunities website revealed.

A Defense Department spokesman attributed the outage to the failure of a legacy component.

The contracting document, posted on May 2, said the outage experienced by the Pentagon Life Safety System Network and Life Safety Backbone left the Pentagon Force Protection Agency “without access to the mission-critical systems needed to properly safeguard personnel and facilities, rendering the agency blind across the national capital region.”

The Hill opens today’s drone-a-palooza:

White House to give senators access to drone assassination memo

Facing a bipartisan revolt over a judicial nominee, the White House on Tuesday promised senators a chance to review a secret memo that provided the legal rationale for killing an American-born al Qaeda leader abroad.

Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle had called for the release of the secret memo written by David Barron outlining the legal justification for striking Anwar al-Awlaki, who was accused of planning and encouraging terrorist attacks against the United States.

President Obama nominated Barron, a former acting assistant attorney general and Harvard Law professor, to serve on the 1st Circuit Court of Appeals in Boston.

Stressing out with the Tribune Washington Bureau:

FAA under pressure to allow commercial drones

In a 2007 policy statement, the Federal Aviation Administration essentially declared a ban on operating drones for commercial purposes. The agency doubled down on that position in early April, appealing an administrative order that tossed out the legal foundation for its policy. The ruling came after a commercial drone user challenged an FAA fine levied against him.

The ongoing case and mounting pressure to tap into the potentially lucrative industry puts the FAA in a tough spot. The regulatory body, responsible for keeping U.S. airspace safe, plans to propose a rule for commercial drones by the end of the year. But regulations aren’t likely to be final until 2015 at the earliest, leaving some wondering whether the FAA can catch up to an industry already half past go.

“I don’t think there’s any question that market pressure is intense and the FAA is struggling on the regulatory side to keep up,” said James H. Burnley, a former U.S. transportation secretary and a Washington attorney.

The Verge weighs in:

News organizations say FAA ban on drones flies against free press

Over a dozen top news and media organizations have come out in opposition to the Federal Aviation Administration’s commercial drone ban, contesting that its broad restrictions violate First Amendment protections afforded to journalists. Though the ban was overturned by a National Transportation Safety Board judge in March, the FAA is currently appealing it. These news organizations — including the Associated Press, The New York Times Company, and the National Press Photographers Association — have filed a brief with the NTSB asking that it affirm the judge’s ruling and continue to block similar bans until the FAA makes an exception for the use of small drones.

“An impermissible chilling effect on the First Amendment newsgathering rights.” “This [current] overly broad policy … has an impermissible chilling effect on the First Amendment newsgathering rights of journalists,” the brief reads. The policies were put into effect — and also overturned — because they were not instated using the proper rule-making process, and the news organizations’ brief reiterates that this means that they and other citizens did not have the opportunity to provide input. “The federal government, through the FAA and with the NTSB’s encouragement, should move forward with the development of polices that protect, rather than hinder, freedom of speech and of the press,” they write.

And Homeland Security News Wire revs up:

Fairbanks, Alaska UAV test site conducts first flight test

The Pan-Pacific Unmanned Aircraft Systems Test Range Complex at the University of Alaska Fairbanks was established last year to help the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) develop regulations and certifications for unmanned aircraft operators and equipment. The goal is to integrate them into the National Airspace System. On Monday, an Aeryon Scout mini quadcopter was the first UAV to be tested at the range. The range is the second of six UAV test sites to receive an FAA’s Certificate of Authorization.

The birds were noisier than the Aeryon Scout as the mini quadcopter whirred over the caribou lounging in the field at the Robert G. White Large Animal Research Station yesterday. The Scout climbed to 200 feet as a crowd of about fifty people silently watched its inaugural flight under the gray overcast sky at Fairbanks, Alaska.

The Atlantic Monthly takes wing, in California:

Eyes Over Compton: How Police Spied on a Whole City

  • A sergeant in the L.A. County Sheriff’s Department compared the experiment to Big Brother, even though he went ahead with it willingly. Is your city next?

In a secret test of mass surveillance technology, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department sent a civilian aircraft* over Compton, California, capturing high-resolution video of everything that happened inside that 10-square-mile municipality.

Compton residents weren’t told about the spying, which happened in 2012. “We literally watched all of Compton during the times that we were flying, so we could zoom in anywhere within the city of Compton and follow cars and see people,” Ross McNutt of Persistence Surveillance Systems told the Center for Investigative Reporting, which unearthed and did the first reporting on this important story. The technology he’s trying to sell to police departments all over America can stay aloft for up to six hours. Like Google Earth, it enables police to zoom in on certain areas. And like TiVo, it permits them to rewind, so that they can look back and see what happened anywhere they weren’t watching in real time.

If it’s adopted, Americans can be policed like Iraqis and Afghanis under occupation–and at bargain prices.

And a story to give one confidence, via  Independent.ie:

Government drone mistakenly delivered to US college student

A US government drone worth $350,000 was accidentally delivered to a college student by delivery service UPS.

Parts of the drone, which was designed to monitor wildlife and environmental changes and can fly for around two hours at a time, were delivered on Monday.

The student uploaded pictures of the package to Reddit under username Seventy_Seven before ringing UPS for an explanation.

From RT, business as usual:

MI5 warns businesses foreign spies targeting their IT staff – report

MI5, the British intelligence agency, has reportedly warned that foreign agents are attempting to recruit IT corporate employees – even low-level contractors – to gain access to classified data.

In these post-Snowden times, when all electronic information and communication has been proven vulnerable to some form of spying, UK intelligence is warning corporate executives in “high-level conversations” on the importance of boosting their “digital defenses,” the Financial Times reported, quoting anonymous Whitehall officials.

The warning comes as the government works to beef up digital security at important institutions such as “banks, utility companies or energy providers,” some of which remain vulnerable to espionage.

Sky News hands over oral history:

Irish Republicans Offered Boston Tapes Return

  • Republicans interviewed for a project on the Northern Ireland Troubles are concerned about their safety or legal exposure.

A college which interviewed republicans actively involved in the Troubles in Northern Ireland has offered to return the interviews to those who provided them.

It comes after some expressed concerns about their safety or legal exposure following the arrest of Sinn Fein president Gerry Adams over the murder of widowed mother-of-10, Jean McConville.

His detention by police in Northern Ireland stemmed from allegations made by republicans in the interviews, which were part of a five-year Boston College oral history project, launched back in 2001.

Stupidity meets the draconian via TheLocal.de:

Bin Laden joker ends up on terror watchlist

A man from Munich who wrote “bin Laden” on a bank transfer form as a joke has been added to the German Central Bank’s terror blacklist for ten years.

The man was transferring €480 to his friend for a ski trip when he wrote bin Laden on the form under a section asking what the money was for. But his unfortunate joke was picked up by computer software put in place to detect transactions which could be funding terrorism, Augsburger Allgemeine newspaper reported.

The monitoring software is compulsory for all banks by EU law and screens all transactions for keywords and key phrases connected with terrorist groups and individuals.

Self-serving Irish leakage meets umbrage via Independent.ie:

Shatter faces fresh calls to resign after breaking the law

Justice Minister Alan Shatter will face fresh calls for his resignation after it was found that he broke the law by leaking sensitive data about Independent TD Mick Wallace.

The Data Protection Commissioner Billy Hawkes today concluded his report into Mr Shatter’s actions on RTE’s ‘Primetime’ during which he revealed that Mr Wallace had been cautioned by gardai for driving while using a mobile phone.

Mr Hawkes stated that the minister breached data protection laws by leaking the information during the live programme.

IntelNews links up:

Germans kidnapped in Ukraine had ‘intelligence connections’

Four German military observers, who were kidnapped in Ukraine by pro-Russian separatists, are members of a military agency that has intelligence contacts, but are not themselves spies, according to a leading German newspaper.

The German observers were abducted along with several other Western military officials on April 25, in the eastern Ukrainian city of Sloviansk. They were participating in a military verification mission organized by the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE).

At the time of the abduction, one pro-Russian separatist leader, Vyacheslav Ponomarev, said his group had decided to detain the OSCE monitors due to “credible information” that they were spies for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO).

From BBC News, and who were they?:

Colombia raids office that ‘spied to undermine peace’

Colombian authorities say they have raided an office that illegally spied on rebel and government communication to try to undermine peace talks.

Colombia’s Attorney General Eduardo Montealegre said the office was run by a criminal organisation that had intercepted emails from a Farc rebel negotiator and the government.

He said President Juan Manuel Santos was also “probably” targeted.

From TheLocal.se, how Swede it wasn’t:

‘Honeytrap failed to snare Brezhnev’s son’

Despite Sweden’s pyjama-party heyday and an MI6 lure called “Ann” with a fail-free seduction record, the Swedish security service Säpo failed to honeytrap Leonid Brezhnev’s son during the Cold War thanks to a tattle-tale defector.

The revelations were published in a new book – Spionjägaren, del 2 (“The Spy Hunter, part two”) – penned by former Säpo head Olof Frånstedt. The book has revealed that Säpo tried to honeytrap the son of Leonid Brezhnev, who was the head of the Soviet Union at the time.

Jurij Brezhnev was stationed in Stockholm at the time and lived in the Lidingö building which until very recently housed the Russian trade mission.

The Swedes had planned to use the promise of sex to lure Brezhnev Jr to a small flat in Östermalm, rigged with cameras and microphones. The encounter, they hoped, would give the Swedes enough material to use as blackmail. And the culture was ripe for such liaisons. Frånstedt wrote that at the time, sexually loaded “pyjama parties” were in full swing among diplomats in Sweden and Säpo staff.

The Verge extends the panopticon read:

Police could use photographic fingerprints to track suspects across social networks

Photographs are turning into the digital equivalent of fingerprints, allowing law enforcement to search through a collection of images to help track down the identity of photo-taking criminals, such as smartphone thieves and child pornographers. Prior investigation has shown that a digital photo can be paired with the very camera that took it by examining the unique noise pattern that its sensor imprints onto photos, and now researchers have begun applying that to social networks, grabbing photos from Facebook, Flickr, Tumblr, Google+, and personal blogs to see whether one individual image could be matched to a specific user’s account.

In a paper published earlier this year, researchers say that they were able to match a photo with a specific person 56 percent of the time in their studied circumstance — examining 10 different people’s photos found on two separate websites each. The researchers, Riccardo Satta and Pasquale Stirparo from the European Commission’s Institute for the Protection and Security of the Citizen, acknowledge that this performance is far from perfect, but they argue that it’s still much better than random guess and could at the least help to pinpoint persons of interest in a criminal investigation. Analayzing photos by what’s known as their “sensor pattern noise” is still a relatively new field, however, so those figuers are likely to rise with more research.

From TheLocal.ch, action at a distance:

Hacker held in Bangkok over Swiss bank fraud???

Law enforcement officials in Thailand have detained a computer hacker suspected of stealing four to five million francs from Swiss online bank accounts.

The man, believed to be a 26-year-old Moroccan, was arrested in Bangkok after justice authorities in Bern issued an international warrant for his arrest, the federal prosecutor’s office confirmed on Monday.

The man is suspected of fraudulently obtaining bank card details and other prohibited economic information through the internet, the office informed the ATS news agency.

The daily newspaper 20 Minuten identified the man as a Moroccan citizen.

After the jump, the latest developments and absurd utterances in the ever-spiraling Game of Zones, with Japan, China, Paris, Washington, and more all piling on. . . Continue reading

Headlines II: Spooks, zones, secrecy, & lies


Today’s tales from the darkside — the world of spies, militarism, security, and privacy — begins with a story containing a phrase that sends chills down the spine. From the Guardian, invoking chilling wartime words in the climate change debate:

Climate change is clear and present danger, says landmark US report

  • National Climate Assessment, to be launched at White House on Tuesday, says effects of climate change are now being felt

Climate change has moved from distant threat to present-day danger and no American will be left unscathed, according to a landmark report due to be unveiled on Tuesday.

The National Climate Assessment, a 1,300-page report compiled by 300 leading scientists and experts, is meant to be the definitive account of the effects of climate change on the US. It will be formally released at a White House event and is expected to drive the remaining two years of Barack Obama’s environmental agenda.

The findings are expected to guide Obama as he rolls out the next and most ambitious phase of his climate change plan in June – a proposal to cut emissions from the current generation of power plants, America’s largest single source of carbon pollution.

Invoking another threat with EUbusiness:

Europe’s cybersecurity policy settings under attack

Even as Europe powered up its most ambitious ever cybersecurity exercise this month, doubts were being raised over whether the continent’s patchwork of online police was right for the job.

The exercise, called Cyber Europe 2014, is the largest and most complex ever enacted, involving 200 organisations and 400 cybersecurity professionals from both the European Union and beyond.

Yet some critics argued that herding together normally secretive national security agencies and demanding that they spend the rest of 2014 sharing information amounted to wishful thinking.

Others questioned whether the law enforcement agencies taking part in the drill should be involved in safeguarding online security, in the wake of American whistleblower Edward Snowden’s revelations of online spying by western governments.

And via a Google translation of a Bild am Sonntag story, what we have suspected proves out:

On behalf of the U.S. Government

CIA agents & FBI advise Kiev

The Ukrainian provisional Government in Kiev is advised by dozens of specialists of the US intelligence agency CIA and the US Federal Bureau of Investigation. That learned on Sunday from German security circles.

The officials will help on behalf of the Federal Government Kiev, to end the rebellion in the East of the country and to build a functioning security structure.

The agents were involved in the Eastern Ukraine but not directly in the fighting with the pro-Russian militias. Their activity is limited to the capital Kiev.

The FBI agents help the Kievan transitional Government also to fight organized crime in the country: A group of investigators and analysts of the US federal police specializing in financial investigations to track down the assets of the former Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych.

And the costs of domestic “security” are proving extensive and dangerous, reports MintPress News:

Skyrocketing Prison Population Devastating US Society

  • National Research Council report documents devastating costs to communities, families and society.

After two years of data review, the NRC this week released a 464-page report that delivers a round indictment of four decades of skyrocketing incarceration that has quadrupled the prison population and torn apart families, communities, society, and the lives of the incarcerated people themselves.

“It is easy for those in power to dismiss communities and organizations how have been fighting this stuff for generations as out in left field or put them in racist stereotypes,” Isaac Ontiveros of Critical Resistance told Common Dreams. “But now you have the center saying the same thing.”

Commissioned by the National Institute of Justice and the MacArthur Foundation, the report finds that 2.23 million people are currently locked in U.S. prisons and jails, but that number multiplies when people who are on parole or probation are considered. This is the result of an “unprecedented and internationally unique rise in U.S. state and federal prison populations” since 1973, according to an NRC statement.

This climbing prison population does not correspond to increases in violence, but rather, is driven by policy changes, including: the imposition of “mandatory minimums” in the 1980s, longer sentences for repeat convictions, and increased criminalization of drug offenses due to the War on Drugs. As a result, incarceration rates for drug offenses to multiply ten times between 1980 and 2010.

From the Observer, the ubiquitous panopticon gets creepier:

Facial recognition: is the technology taking away your identity?

Facial recognition technology is being used by companies such as Tesco, Google and Facebook, and it has huge potential for security. Concerned? It may be too late to opt out…

This summer, Facebook will present a paper at a computer vision conference revealing how it has created a tool almost as accurate as the human brain when it comes to saying whether two photographs show the same person – regardless of changes in lighting and camera angles. A human being will get the answer correct 97.53% of the time; Facebook’s new technology scores an impressive 97.25%. “We closely approach human performance,” says Yaniv Taigman, a member of its AI team.

Since the ability to recognise faces has long been a benchmark for artificial intelligence, developments such as Facebook’s “DeepFace” technology (yes, that’s what it called it) raise big questions about the power of today’s facial recognition tools and what these mean for the future.

Facebook is not the only tech company interested in facial recognition. A patent published by Apple in March shows how the Cupertino company has investigated the possibility of using facial recognition as a security measure for unlocking its devices – identifying yourself to your iPhone could one day be as easy as snapping a quick selfie.

Ars Technica drones on, then off:

Drones banned at Yosemite National Park

  • Park Service says drones are noisy and “can impact the natural landscape.”

The National Park Service is warning visitors to Yosemite National Park that drones “are prohibited within park boundaries.”

The service announced the decision Friday and cited a federal law that says “delivering or retrieving a person or object by parachute, helicopter, or other airborne means, except in emergencies involving public safety or serious property loss, or pursuant to the terms and conditions of a permit” is illegal.

The latest move against drones comes months after the Federal Aviation Administration grounded a nonprofit Texas volunteer search-and-rescue outfit that employs five-pound styrofoam drones.

From the Toronto Globe and Mail, the Panopticon north of the border:

Now we know Ottawa can snoop on any Canadian. What are we going to do?

Since June, 2013, a steady stream of revelations from Edward Snowden has shed light on a vast U.S.-led surveillance system. While there have been several important Canadian-related revelations, none has raised clear issues of potential unlawfulness. That is, until now.

A “Top Secret” presentation obtained by the CBC from the Snowden cache, which I reviewed in detail, outlines the indiscriminate and bulk collection and analysis of Canadian communications data by the Communications Security Establishment of Canada (CSEC). Assuming the documents are legitimate, it is difficult not to reach the conclusion that these activities constitute a clear violation of CSEC’s mandates and almost certainly of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

The CSEC presentation describes ubiquitous surveillance programs clearly directed at Canadians, involving data associated with Canadian airports, hotels, wi-fi cafes, enterprises and other domestic locations. The presentation outlines the challenges of discerning specific internet addresses and IDs associated with users within the universe of bulk data, paying special attention to challenges involving the movement of people through airports. It outlines results of experiments undertaken at a medium-sized city airport, which could possibly mean Calgary or Halifax, and which includes observations at “other domestic airports,” “hotels in many cities” and “mobile gateways in many cities.” Observations are made with detailed graphs of specific patterns of communications, noting differences as to how individuals communicate upon arrival and during departure, how long they spend in transit lounges, wi-fi cafes, hotel visits and even places of work. The objectives, the presentation says, are to separate the “needle from the haystack” – the haystack being, of course, all of us.

From Britain, the London Telegraph reports on a man once considered a major security threat to Old Blighty:

Gerry Adams released over Jean McConville murder

  • But Sinn Fein leader may still face charges as police file is to be sent to prosecutors

From FRANCE 24, refuge for the persecuted:

French non-profit offers a home to exiled journalists

In honour of World Press Freedom Day, the Maison des Journalistes (MDJ), a French non-profit organization that offers shelter and support to journalists forced to flee their home countries, opened its doors to FRANCE 24.

Based in Paris’s 15th arrondissement, the MDJ was founded in 2002, and has since housed more than 250 journalists from 54 different countries. . .

“When they first get here, we give them housing and we help them get political asylum,” Darline Cothière, MDJ’s director, explained. “Then we help them get the right paperwork, so they can get medical coverage and unemployment. It’s administrative help, but it’s stuff that needs to be done.”

Because so many of those who cross MDJ’s threshold have lived through trauma, the non-profit also provides psychological counseling.

And from the Associated Press, police malfeasance on troubled turf:

Ex-security head: Israel soft on anti-Arab crimes

The former head of Israel’s Shin Bet security agency says its current leader does not take seriously recent vandalism by ultranationalist Jews of Palestinian and Arab Israeli property.

Carmi Gillon says he believes Yoram Cohen does not invest enough resources to stop the vandalism.

“He belittles the danger of these activities. He apparently does not prioritize this matter,” Gillon told Army Radio Sunday.

A fringe of mostly radical settlers has carried out vandalism in recent years to protest Israeli policy and respond to actions by Palestinians, drawing condemnation by Israeli leaders but few arrests.

After the jump, the latest in the ongoing Asian Game of Zones, with new escalations, word games, and new North Korean craziness. . .
Continue reading

Headlines: Spies, laws, lies, and zones


Our second set of headlines, as always, brings notable developments in the realms of espionage [both governmental and corporate], security at home and above [both personal and national], miltarism, and the ongoing never-ending Asian Game of Zones.

We begin with Snowden blowback from the New York Times:

Merkel Says Gaps With U.S. Over Surveillance Remain

Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany said Friday that there were still significant differences between Germany and the United States over the issue of surveillance, and warned that it was too soon to return to “business as usual” between the two allies.

At a joint news conference at the White House, both Ms. Merkel and President Obama addressed the tensions between the two countries caused by the disclosure last October that the National Security Agency had eavesdropped on Ms. Merkel’s phone calls. At the time, Ms. Merkel said that “spying between friends is simply unacceptable,” and that there had been a breach of trust that would have to be repaired.

Speaking in the Rose Garden after a meeting with Mr. Obama, Ms. Merkel said that “we have a few difficulties still to overcome,” noting in particular a difference “on the issue of proportionality.”

And a related development from TheLocal.de:

German IT expert hacks NSA homepage

A computer expert from eastern Germany claims to have hacked the homepage of the US National Security Agency (NSA), leaving a message on the site for American security experts.

Matthias Ungethüm from Saxony said on Friday he had replaced the NSA slogan “Codebreakers and Codemakers” with the German phrase “Durchleuchten Sie Ihre Homepage” – “Examine your homepage” on the website of America’s security agency.

The NSA is deeply unpopular in Germany after revelations last year it carried out a mass surveillance programme and tapped the phone of Chancellor Angela Merkel. So Ungethüm decided to turn the tables.

From the Christian Science Monitor, mixed signals from the White House:

Online privacy: Obama report outlines the perils, and promise, of ‘big data’

The Obama administration report calls for an online bill of rights, but it also recognizes that insights from big data are being tapped to solve problems, not just push personalized online ads.

A new Obama administration report calls the collection of personal data by corporations increasingly “invasive,” but also sings the praises of so-called “big data.”

The report calls for new steps, such as an online bill of rights. Yet it also seeks to tread cautiously in a fast-evolving realm that spans from Facebook to online shopping and medical information.

That’s because the insights gleaned from big data – the act of compiling and analyzing digital information about consumers – are being tapped to solve problems, not just push personalized online ads.

The report envisions stakeholders such as corporations coming together “to develop voluntary, enforceable codes of conduct that specify how the Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights applies in specific business contexts.”

And for your amusement, this creation of Walt Handelsman for the New Orleans Advocate:

Fade to white

Fade to white

From CBC News, smilar concerns, north of the border:

State surveillance under microscope

Canada’s interim privacy commissioner Chantal Bernier has called for a revamp of federal privacy laws that would require telecom firms to tell Canadians how many requests for data on private citizens they handle from federal enforcement bodies.

Her request to a Senate committee followed revelations that  nine telecommunication companies field 1.2 million requests for private customer information every year and raises the issue of how extensively federal agencies are monitoring Canadian citizens.

The revelations come on the heels of Edward Snowden’s documents showing that the phone calls of American citizens were under widespread surveillance by the CIA and National Security Agency. The U.S. whistleblower also revealed a vast network of Canadian spying on behalf of the NSA.

From Ars Technica, Ars Propaganda:

US State Department adopting social media to counter Al-Qaeda propaganda

  • US says violent extremists increasingly taking to social media.

Buried in an intelligence report published Wednesday, the government said that the Center for Strategic Counterterrorism Communications (CSCC), established in 2011, last year produced more than 10,000 online postings globally, some of which included one of 138 government-produced videos.

“CSCC’s programs draw on a full range of intelligence information and analysis for context and feedback. CSCC counters terrorist propaganda in the social media environment on a daily basis, contesting space where AQ and its supporters formerly had free rein. CSCC communications have provoked defensive responses from violent extremists on many of the 249 most popular extremist websites and forums as well as on social media,” said the document, Country Reports on Terrorism 2013 (PDF).

The State Department has a global social media presence from Afghanistan to Vietnam. The platform ranges from blogs to Facebook, Flickr, Twitter, Pinterest, YouTube, Google+, Instagram, and others. But the government also trains others, including victims of terrorism, to adopt social media, according to the report.

From Homeland Security News Wire, mounting fears?:

Russia may launch crippling cyberattacks on U.S. in retaliation for Ukraine sanctions

U.S. officials and security experts are warning that Russian hackers may attack the computer networks of U.S. banks and critical infrastructure firms in retaliation for new sanctions by the Obama administration, imposed in response to Russia’s actions in Ukraine. Cybersecurity specialists consider Russian hackers among the best at infiltrating networks and some say that they have already inserted malicious software on computer systems in the United States.

U.S. officials and security experts are warning that Russian hackers may attack the computer networks of U.S. banks and critical infrastructure firms in retaliation for new sanctions by the Obama administration, imposed in response to Russia’s actions in Ukraine. Cybersecurity specialists consider Russian hackers among the best at infiltrating networks and some say that they have already inserted malicious software on computer systems in the United States.

Black sites and black actions from Al Jazeera America:

Senate report set to reveal Djibouti as CIA ‘black site’

  • Horn of Africa nation has denied hosting secret prison facilities for US, but classified document may undermine claim

The legal case of a former CIA detainee suing the government of Djibouti for hosting the facility where he says he was detained could be helped by the contents of a still-classified Senate report. Djibouti, a key U.S. ally, has denied for years that its territory has been used to keep suspected Al-Qaeda operatives in secret captivity. But the Senate investigation into the agency’s “detention and interrogation program” concluded that several people had been secretly detained in the tiny Horn of Africa state, two U.S. officials who read an early draft of the report told Al Jazeera.

Official confirmation of Djibouti’s role in hosting “black sites” used in the CIA’s rendition program would be welcomed by Mohammad al-Asad, a Yemeni arrested at his home in Tanzania on Dec. 27, 2003, blindfolded and flown to a location he insists was Djibouti. Two U.S. officials who read an early draft of the report of the Senate Intelligence Committee’s investigation — and who requested anonymity because the report remains classified — were unaware of whether al-Asad’s case was specifically cited in the document. But they confirmed that the report found that several detainees had been held in Djibouti, and that at least two of them had been wrongfully detained.

DutchNews.nl stands up to Washington:

Court was right to stop terror suspect deportation to US

The appeal court in The Hague was right to call a halt to the deportation of terror suspect Sabir K to the US in 2013, the advocate general of the Dutch supreme court said on Friday, according to broadcaster Nos.

The Hague court said last July there was still too much uncertainty over the involvement of America in K’s torture following his arrest in Pakistan. The Dutch government, which backs K’s deportation, then took the issue to the Supreme Court.

The advocate general’s advice is usually acted upon by the supreme court when it makes its rulings.

From Sky News, police John-shaming:

Prostitution Sting To Be Live-Tweeted By Police

Names and photographs of suspects arrested for soliciting prostitutes will be published on a police force’s Twitter account.

A police force has been criticised after promising to live-tweet a prostitution sting next week.

Officers in Maryland say they will “take you along for the takedowns” as they target people who use sex workers in Prince George County.

The names and photographs of suspects will be tweeted as they are arrested.

Another nit-tweet from TheLocal.se:

Student suspended for insulting prof on Twitter

A Swedish college has suspended a 21-year-old female student who took to Twitter to insult her teacher’s appearance while he was giving a lecture.

The male teacher at Jönköping University told administrators that he noticed the student taking a picture of him, and that the incident not only disrupted the lecture but left him feeling upset and violated.

The notes from the disciplinary hearing did not specify what kind of comments the 21-year-old woman made. She has since said her actions were “immature”.

And another leak-seeking, this ine on Casa esnl’s home turf via Berkeleyside:

City of Berkeley seeks source of leaked confidential info

The city of Berkeley is on the hunt to determine who released private police personnel documents related to a confidential investigation — into an in-custody death involving local officers last year — to UC Berkeley’s Daily Californian newspaper.

Thursday evening, Berkeley city manager Christine Daniel notified the mayor and council members about the leak, which she described to them via email as “an unfortunate and concerning event that occurred regarding confidential police personnel information.”

Daniel wrote that the Daily Cal had told the city it had gotten “confidential personnel-specific findings” from the Police Review Commission’s inquest into the in-custody death of Kayla Moore last year. (Moore’s family has filed a lawsuit against the city over that fatality.)

From Ars Technica, and they’ll take it only from their cold, dead hands?:

Feds issue “draft guidance” to restrict high-powered laser pointers

  • If passed, nearly all such lasers would be capped at 5 milliwatts of power.

On Friday, the Food and Drug Administration published new draft guidance that could effectively put an end to high-powered lasers in the United States. It will not be formally approved until the 90-day comment period has passed.

The move is likely in response to the growing threat of laser strikes against aircraft. Since early 2014, the FBI has offered a $10,000 reward to anyone who reports a laser strike to federal authorities, leading to an arrest. Since the FBI began keeping track in 2004, there have been more than 12,000 reported incidents nationwide—and the incident rate continues to climb.

Earlier this year, a California man was sentenced to 14 years in prison in a lasering incident, believed to be the harshest such sentence in the United States, and possibly in the world. Pilots say that being struck with such lasers can be terrifying, causing temporary blindness and sometimes lingering headaches.

From TechWeekEurope, let your paranoia run rampant:

Apple Earpods To Include Health Sensors – Report

New Apple earpods will reportedly include sensors to monitor a user’s heart rate and blood pressure

Apple is following Samsung into the health market after a leak suggested that its next generation earbuds (or earpods in Apple speak) will include health sensors.

The report (if true) highlights an increasing problem for tech firms in Silicon Valley, as the leak came from a posting on the anonymous social network ‘Secret’, which is favoured by many high-tech workers. Secret yesterday revealed plans to launch in the UK and elsewhere.

“Apple’s new EarPods will have sensors in them, for heart rate & blood pressure. Also iBeacons so they don’t get lost. They will require the lightning port, it’s why the audio jack was moved to the bottom,” said the anonymous posting on Secret.

The posting also reportedly added that “[The phone] stores the data in a similar way to thumbprint point data, fully encrypted and nothing identifiable. But nice to send to your doctor to keep track of at which point your blood pressure started rising for example.”

From Corriere della Sera, cans of worms, about to be opened, including cases in which intelligence agencies and undercover operators were deeply ivolved, often causally:

Renzi Declassifies “Years of Lead” Files

  • “A duty to victims”, says PM. Order accelerates transfer of classified documents held by central government administrations

last week’s announcement, Italy’s prime minister, Matteo Renzi, yesterday signed an order declassifying files on the Ustica (1980), Peteano (1972), Italicus (1974), Piazza Fontana (1969), Piazza della Loggia (1974), Gioia Tauro (1970), Bologna railway station (1980) and Rapido 904 train (1984) murders. The signing took place at Palazzo Chigi in the presence of the junior minister for the Prime Minister’s Office with responsibility for the security services, Marco Minniti, and the director of the department of security information (DIS), ambassador Giampiero Massolo. Mr Renzi commented: “One of the key features of this government’s actions is transparency and openness. Today’s decision is a step in that direction. I consider it a duty towards Italians and towards the relatives of the victims of these events, which remain a dark stain on our collective memory”.

Later, Mr Renzi tweeted that the government had declassified documents on “some of the darkest pages in Italian history”, adding to the list the 1973 attack on the police headquarters in Milan. In line with last Friday’s ruling by the interministerial consultative and decision-making committee on intelligence service policy (CISR), the order enables early transfer of “classified files held by all central government administrations that represent an important contribution to the historic memory of the nation”.]

After the jump, that latest from Asia, including a memorable anniversary ahead, the latest and complex developments in that ongoing Games of Zones, salami tactics, a panopticon expansion, and the latest from the regional wild card. . . Continue reading

Headlines: Threats, drones, zones, spies, hacks


We begin today’s tales-from-the-dark-side collection with a reminder that the threats you suspect aren’t always the ones that get you. From Bloomberg Businessweek:

Bacteria Are Adapting to Drugs Faster than We Can Develop New Ones

Some harmful bacteria are adapting to drugs faster than cures can be developed, according to a report published today by the World Health Organization. Infections resistant to antibiotics are “happening right now in every region of the world and [have] the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country,” the organization wrote.

The WHO report is the latest urgent alarm that our medical arsenal may be running out of ammunition against potentially deadly bugs. The last new class of antibiotic drugs was developed in the 1980s. The drought since then, the organization says, is “a discovery void.”

As microbes reproduce, they evolve to become more resilient to the therapies that doctors have used to treat bacteria since the first patients got penicillin in the 1940s. That process is accelerated when drugs are overused, or used improperly.

In the United States, 80 percent of antibiotics (measured by weight) are used for farm animals, as journalist Maryn McKenna documented last year, mostly to promote growth rather than to treat disease. The Food and Drug Administration in December attempted to reduce antibiotic use in farming, but the rules have been criticized as ineffective. Europe has largely banned the use of low-dose antibiotics to promote animal growth.

And from the Guardian, numbers that might lead one to question certain policies:

Global terrorism rose 43% in 2013 despite al-Qaida splintering, US reports

  • State Department says 16 Americans killed out of 17,891 total
  • Surge complicates sprawling counter-terrorism efforts led by US

Terrorist attacks rose 43% worldwide in 2013 despite a splintering of al-Qaida’s leadership and a sprawling global counter-terrorism campaign, according to new statistics released by the State Department on Wednesday.

The exposure of Americans to terrorism abroad remained minimal in 2013, with 16 US citizens killed out of 17,891 globally and seven Americans wounded out of 32,577. Almost 3,000 people were kidnapped or taken hostage by terrorists in 2013, and a mere 12 of them were Americans.

Despite the increase in attacks, the vast majority of terrorist incidents were local and regional, not international in focus, the State Department data indicates.

From Ars Technica, a defeat for corporate pedophilia:

Google ends “creepy” practice of scanning Gmail education apps

Tech giant was sued over alleged violations of wiretap and privacy laws.

Technology giant Google has ended its practice of scanning its users’ Apps for Education accounts for advertising purposes after being sued by students and other Gmail users last year, the company announced Wednesday.

The Google Apps for Education tool suite is a service the company provides for free to more than 30 million students, teachers, and administrators globally. The service includes access to Gmail, Google Docs, Google Calendar, and cloud storage.

Users of the Apps for Education tools suite and other Gmail users have alleged that the company’s data scanning practices violated federal and state anti-wiretapping and privacy laws, according to the suit filed in a California federal court.

And whilst on the subject of corporate-enabled snooping, there’s this from Kyle Chayka for the Guardian:

The facial recognition databases are coming. Why aren’t the privacy laws?

  • Now that the US supreme court is finally considering cellphones, let’s get ahead of Moore’s Law and defend our new metadata

Online dating is kind of like going on a shopping trip. But instead of looking at pairs of shoes, we’re perusing people, glancing over their photos and profiles in an effort to gauge how interested we might be in them. So why shouldn’t we be warned, like a grocery-store expiration date, when one is rotten?

Such is the intention of CreepShield, a new web-browser extension that uses facial recognition technology to allow users to scan the faces they see on social networking websites – Facebook, eHarmony, OKCupid, even Grindr – and see if the faces match any public records in databases of sex offenders.

The app seems somewhat useful. Unless, of course, you’re mistakenly identified as a sex offender. When I uploaded my own photo after writing a recent Newsweek cover story on biometric surveillance, the CreepShield search engine showed results that were less than 50% sure I was a match – though there were some people in the database who looked eerily similar to me.

From MintPress News, Diane Feinstein strikes again:

Why US Intelligence Officials Pressured Senate To Block Public Release Of Drone Strikes

“A basic report of the number of people killed shouldn’t be too much to ask,” one human rights advocate argues.

It appears Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California and her colleagues on the Senate Intelligence Committee have largely forgiven the U.S. intelligence community for eavesdropping on their phone calls and spying on their email correspondence.

Acting on the request of James Clapper, the director of national intelligence, Feinstein and her colleagues on the Senate Intelligence Committee voted on Monday to remove a provision from a major intelligence bill that would have required the U.S. government to disclose information about when drone strikes occur — especially overseas — as well as information about the victims of the drone strikes.

Though previous drafts of the intelligence legislation didn’t require the White House to disclose the exact number of drone strikes carried out worldwide, human rights groups applauded the move to publish an annual report available to the public on the exact number of “combatants” and “non-combatant civilians” killed or injured by U.S. drone strikes each year.

The Oakland Tribune covers drone fears closer to Casa esnl:

Berkeley council takes cautious look at issue of drones

Speakers at Tuesday evening’s City Council workshop to develop domestic drone policy ranged from those who called for making the city a “drone free zone,” to supporters of limited drone use in police and fire emergencies.

The council made no policy recommendations at the workshop, but referred the issue for further study to the city’s Agenda Committee.

Jack Hamm, vice chair of the Disaster Fire Safety Commission read his commission’s resolution advocating drone use by Berkeley police and fire departments in “appropriate circumstances.”

From Spiegel, more Snowden revelations blowback:

NSA What? Spying Scandal Unlikely to Dominate Merkel’s US Visit

  • German Chancellor Merkel expects little progress in clarifying the NSA affair in Washington this week. She is still angered by US spying on her cell phone communications, but will instead address the Ukraine crisis and free trade with President Obama.

The Washington Post announces a purge:

Head of Pentagon intelligence agency forced out, officials say

The head of the Defense Intelligence Agency is being pushed out of the job after a series of clashes over his leadership at an agency that is under pressure to shift focus following more than a decade of war, current and former U.S. officials said.

Lt. Gen. Michael T. Flynn is expected to announce Wednesday that he is leaving his job as director of the Defense Intelligence Agency more than a year before he was scheduled to depart, according to officials who said that Flynn faced mounting pressure from Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. and others in recent months.

The Pentagon did not immediately reply to a request for comment.

The move comes at a time when the DIA is in the midst of a series of major changes, including an effort by senior Pentagon officials to expand the agency’s network of spies overseas and work more closely with the CIA. Flynn, who served as a top intelligence adviser to Gen. Stanley McChrystal in Iraq and Afghanistan, arrived in July 2012 with an ambitious agenda to accelerate the agency’s transformation. But critics said his management style also sowed chaos, setting aggressive plans for changes without adequate follow-through.

Wired threat level raises an interesting question:

Has the NSA Been Using the Heartbleed Bug as an Internet Peephole?

When ex-government contractor Edward Snowden exposed the NSA’s widespread efforts to eavesdrop on the internet, encryption was the one thing that gave us comfort. Even Snowden touted encryption as a saving grace in the face of the spy agency’s snooping. “Encryption works,” the whistleblower said last June. “Properly implemented strong crypto systems are one of the few things that you can rely on.”

But Snowden also warned that crypto systems aren’t always properly implemented. “Unfortunately,” he said, “endpoint security is so terrifically weak that NSA can frequently find ways around it.”
Since the Heartbleed bug has existed for two years, it raises obvious questions about whether the NSA or other spy agencies were exploiting it before its discovery.

This week, that caveat hit home — in a big way — when researchers revealed Heartbleed, a two-year-old security hole involving the OpenSSL software many websites use to encrypt traffic. The vulnerability doesn’t lie in the encryption itself, but in how the encrypted connection between a website and your computer is handled. On a scale of one to ten, cryptographer Bruce Schneier ranks the flaw an eleven.

From The Intercept, covetousness from across the pond:

British Spy Chiefs Secretly Begged to Play in NSA’s Data Pools

Britain’s electronic surveillance agency, Government Communications Headquarters, has long presented its collaboration with the National Security Agency’s massive electronic spying efforts as proportionate, carefully monitored, and well within the bounds of privacy laws. But according to a top-secret document in the archive of material provided to The Intercept by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, GCHQ secretly coveted the NSA’s vast troves of private communications and sought “unsupervised access” to its data as recently as last year – essentially begging to feast at the NSA’s table while insisting that it only nibbles on the occasional crumb.

The document, dated April 2013, reveals that GCHQ requested broad new authority to tap into data collected under a law that authorizes a variety of controversial NSA surveillance initiatives, including the PRISM program.

PRISM is a system used by the NSA and the FBI to obtain the content of personal emails, chats, photos, videos, and other data processed by nine of the world’s largest internet companies, including Google, Yahoo!, Microsoft, Apple, Facebook, and Skype. The arrangement GCHQ proposed would also have provided the British agency with greater access to millions of international phone calls and emails that the NSA siphons directly from phone networks and the internet.

From Britain, where the security state meets the pavement, via Sky News:

Police Face Disciplinary Over Stop And Search

The Home Secretary says it is “absolutely disgusting” that six times more black and ethnic minority people are stopped.

Police officers will face disciplinary hearings if they do not stick to a new, tougher code of practice for stop and search.

Home Secretary Theresa May said an investigation by Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) found in 27% of stop and searches there were no reasonable grounds for suspicion.

Figures also show those with black or ethnic minority backgrounds were six times more likely to be stopped and searched than white people, which she said was “absolutely disgraceful”.

And a ghost from the bloody past leads to an arrest, via USA TODAY:

Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams arrested in 1972 IRA killing

Northern Ireland police say they have arrested Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams on suspicion of involvement in the Irish Republican Army’s 1972 abduction, killing and secret burial of a Belfast widow.

Adams confirmed his own arrest Wednesday in a prepared statement and described it as a voluntary, prearranged interview.

Police had been expected to question the 65-year-old Adams about the 1972 killing of Jean McConville, whom the IRA executed as an alleged spy. The IRA did not admit the killing until 1998.

ANSA covers the curious case of cops who cheered collegeus for kicking, clubbing, and otherwise fatally beating  Federico Aldrovandi, an 18-year-old student from Ferrara after stopping him for public drunkeness:

Alfano scrubs police meeting after brutality-death applause

  • Calls standing ovation for Aldrovandi convicts ‘grave’

Italian Interior Minister Angelino Alfano on Wednesday cancelled a meeting with the SAP police union after its members gave a standing five-minute ovation to three fellow officers who were convicted of killing an 18-year-old man during a routine stop in Ferrara in 2005.

“I revoke the appointment that I had given to the Union of Autonomous Police at the Interior Ministry in Rome on Tuesday,” Alfano said.

“It was an unacceptable and extremely serious gesture,” Alfano added.

The minister told public radio GR1 that the applause was “even more grave because it was done by men who represent the State and can not fail to acknowledge the meaning of a final judgement”. “That applause did great damage to the police,” Alfano added.

And in the business-as-usual department, this from the Guardian:

US intercepts Moscow’s calls to spies in Ukraine, report says

  • US secretary state reportedly tells private meeting recordings disprove Russian denials about involvement in separatist unrest

The US secretary of state, John Kerry, claims America has obtained intercepted phone calls that prove Moscow is deliberating trying to destabilise eastern Ukraine, according to reports of leaked remarks he made at a private meeting last week.

US news site the Daily Beast quoted Kerry saying: “Intel is producing taped conversations of intelligence operatives taking their orders from Moscow … We know exactly where they are coming from.”

On to Asia with the Guardian again, with grim news for the Fourth Estate:

Pakistan’s spy agency ISI accused of kidnapping and killing journalists

  • Amnesty International details journalists’ claims of harassment, intimidation and attacks at the hands of military intelligence

Amnesty International says it has “credible concerns” that Pakistan’s powerful military spy agency kidnaps, threatens and even kills journalists who cross it.

The allegations come amid an unprecedented public standoff between the Directorate of Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) and the country’s biggest media group over an attempt by unknown gunmen to kill Hamid Mir, a popular journalist on the Geo television network.

In a detailed report, the human rights group says journalists face extraordinary challenges in Pakistan, including deadly threats from banned militant groups and the armed wings of political parties. But Amnesty says it found that “no state actor is more feared by journalists than the ISI”.

And on Thailand, where the pot continues to boil in a dispute following town/country lines, via the Associated Press:

Thai government, poll body agree on July 20 vote

Thailand’s government and the state Election Commission have agreed to hold new general polls on July 20.

The commission announced the date after meeting Wednesday with Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra and other officials.

Thailand held a general election on Feb. 2 after Yingluck dissolved Parliament’s lower house in response to protests calling on her to step down. The Constitutional Court nullified the election in late March because it failed to be held according to law after the protesters disrupted the registration process and voting.

More from the South China Morning Post:

Thai opposition refuses to commit to July election, threatens ‘final uprising’

Thailand’s prime minister and the country’s Election Commission agreed yesterday to hold an election in July despite the opposition’s reluctance to say whether it will take part.

Anti-government protesters have vowed to disrupt any election – as they did in boycotting a February poll that was later annulled – as part of a six-month campaign to oust Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra.

“The prime minister and the Election Commission agree on a July 20 election,” Puchong Nutrawong, secretary general of the commission, said.

Anti-government protest leader Suthep Thaugsuban has shown no sign of giving in, even though the number of demonstrators has dwindled.

We are approaching D-day … This will be our final uprising, our ultimate gathering,” Suthep told supporters on Tuesday.

And after the jump, on to the latest chapters in the ongoing Game of Zones playing out in Asia as America and its allies play dangerous diplomilitary games with China, plus a nightmare scenario hits the road. . .. Continue reading

Headlines, threats, pols, cons, and more


Today’s global news wrapup covers lots of ground, starting with a New York Times story on the skewed jobs picture resulting from the —ahem — Obama recovery:

Recovery Has Created Far More Low-Wage Jobs Than Better-Paid Ones

The deep recession wiped out primarily high-wage and middle-wage jobs. Yet the strongest employment growth during the sluggish recovery has been in low-wage work, at places like strip malls and fast-food restaurants.

In essence, the poor economy has replaced good jobs with bad ones. That is the conclusion of a new report from the National Employment Law Project, a research and advocacy group, analyzing employment trends four years into the recovery.

“Fast food is driving the bulk of the job growth at the low end — the job gains there are absolutely phenomenal,” said Michael Evangelist, the report’s author. “If this is the reality — if these jobs are here to stay and are going to be making up a considerable part of the economy — the question is, how do we make them better?”

Next, two headlines defining the meaning of Republican Family Values™. Both from USA TODAY.

First, this:

Kissing congressman won’t run for re-election

Rep. Vance McAllister, R-La., said Monday he will not seek re-election in November, after being caught on video kissing a female aide.

McAlllister, who was elected just five months ago in a special election, first informed The News Star in Monroe, La., of his decision. He will serve out this term, which ends in January 2015.

“I am committed to serving the 5th District to the best of my ability through this term, but I also have to take care of my family as we work together to repair and strengthen the relationship I damaged,” McAllister said. He and his wife, Kelly, are returning to Washington later Monday.

And by way of contrast, this:

Rep. Grimm charged with tax fraud, says he won’t quit

A 20-count indictment unsealed Monday charged Rep. Michael Grimm, R-N.Y.,with an alleged tax evasion scheme involving the concealment of more than $1 million in receipts from his New York restaurant where he employed an undisclosed number of undocumented immigrants.

Grimm surrendered to federal authorities Monday and pleaded not guilty to charges of conspiracy, obstruction, mail fraud and perjury related to the alleged scheme involving his fast-food restaurant Healthalicious. But he said he would not resign his seat in Congress.

“In total, Grimm concealed over $1 million in Healthalicious gross receipts alone, as well as hundreds of thousands of dollars of employees’ wages, fraudulently depriving the federal and New York state governments of sales, income and payroll taxes,’‘ court documents state.

So there it is: Cheat on your wife, lose your position. Cheat Uncle Sam and you soldier on, just like another recent GOP icon.

And from the Toronto Globe and Mail, bad news for Bill Gates:

U.S. advises avoiding Microsoft’s Internet Explorer until bug fixed

  • Malicious Operation Clandestine Fox campaign targets U.S. defence, financial firms

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security advised computer users to consider using alternatives to Microsoft Corp’s Internet Explorer browser until the company fixes a security flaw that hackers have used to launch attacks.

The bug is the first high-profile security flaw to emerge since Microsoft stopped providing security updates for Windows XP earlier this month. That means PCs running the 13-year old operating system could remain unprotected against hackers seeking to exploit the newly uncovered flaw, even after Microsoft figures out how to defend against it.

The United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team, a part of Homeland Security known as US-CERT, said in an advisory released on Monday morning that the vulnerability in versions 6 to 11 of Internet Explorer could lead to “the complete compromise” of an affected system.

From Want China Times, Motor City looks East for salvation:

Chinese immigrants could save Detroit: governor

Bankrupt Detroit announced its new immigration plan that aims to attract Chinese investors, and the combined investment from China has reached US$100 billion, the ninth highest among the 50 states in the United States.

Although is was seeking Chinese investment, the city’s chronic problems with public disorder, racial conflict, and chaos in urban planning may still put its future at risk, according to the Southern Weekly.

The city, which has a factory that produced the first Ford car, was a major hub for automobile manufacturing worldwide. Its collapse after suffering huge debt and dying industries symbolizes the world’s farewell to the era of traditional industry.

Closer to home, The Guardian covers ranching chaos in the Golden State:

California drought drives exodus of cattle ranchers to eastern states

Ranchers herd their stock away from dying grasslands as beef prices reach record highs and industry faces uncertain future

In the midst of the worst California drought in decades, the grass is stunted and some creeks are dry. Ranchers in the Golden State are loading tens of thousands of heifers and steers onto trucks and hauling them eastward to Nevada, Texas, Nebraska and beyond.

“If there’s no water and no feed, you move the cows,” said Gaylord Wright, 65, owner of California Fats and Feeders Inc. “You move them or they die.”

The exact headcount for livestock on this cattle drive is not known. But a Reuters review of state agriculture department records filed when livestock cross state borders indicates that up to 100,000 California cattle have left the state in the past four months alone.

While the McClatchy Washington Bureau covers another impact of water shortages combined with drug war rules:

With no federal water, pot growers could be high and dry

Newly licensed marijuana growers in Washington state may find themselves without a key source of water just as spring planting gets under way.

Federal officials say they’ll decide quickly whether the U.S. government can provide water for the growers or whether doing so would violate the federal Controlled Substances Act, which makes possession of the drug illegal.

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, which controls the water supply for two-thirds of Washington state’s irrigated land, is expected to make a decision by early May, and perhaps as soon as this week, said Dan DuBray, the agency’s chief spokesman.

And on the subject of pot, United Press International covers dires predictions unfulfilled in the Centennial State:

Only 15 percent of Colorado residents say they have bought recreational marijuana

The Quinnipiac Poll finds most Colorado residents say legalizing pot has not eroded state’s “moral fiber” and more than half expect it to help state budget.

While almost half of Colorado residents say they have used marijuana, only 15 percent say they have done so since the state legalized it Jan. 1, a new poll finds.

Generally, residents still support legalization, with 67 percent saying it has “not eroded the moral fiber” of Coloradoans, a Quinnipiac poll reported Monday. Only 30 percent said it has.

Half of those polled said they expect legalization to aid the criminal justice system, and 54 percent said that it has not made driving in Colorado more dangerous. More than half, 53 percent, said legalization “increases personal freedoms in a positive way,” and the same percentage expect the change to save the state money.

And from MIT Technology Review, more consequences of the mare’s nest exposed by Edward Snowden:

Spying Is Bad for Business

Can we trust an Internet that’s become a weapon of governments?

The big question in this MIT Technology Review business report is how the Snowden revelations are affecting the technology business. Some of the consequences are already visible. Consumers are favoring anonymous apps. Large Internet companies, like Google, have raced to encrypt all their communications. In Germany, legislators are discussing an all-European communications grid.

There is a risk that the Internet could fracture into smaller national networks, protected by security barriers. In this view, Brazil’s new cable is akin to China’s Great Firewall (that country’s system for censoring Web results), or calls by nationalists in Russia to block Skype, or an unfolding German plan to keep most e-mail traffic within its borders. Nations are limiting access to their networks. The result, some believe, could be the collapse of the current Internet.

Analysts including Forrester Research predict billions in losses for U.S. Internet services such as Dropbox and Amazon because of suspicion from technology consumers, particularly in Europe, in the wake of Snowden’s revelations. “The Snowden leaks have painted a U.S.-centric Internet infrastructure, and now people are looking for alternatives,” says James Lewis, director of the strategic technologies program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C.

One business is really booming, as Homeland Security News Wire reports:

Demand for terrorism insurance remains strong

The fourth edition of the Terrorism Risk Insurance Report has found that demand for terrorism insurance remains strong and the renewal of the Terrorism Risk Insurance Program Reauthorization Act (TRIA) plays a key role in making coverage available and affordable. A survey of roughly 2,600 organizations found that the demand and price for terrorism insurance has remained constant since 2009. Education organizations purchase property terrorism insurance at a higher rate, 81 percent, than companies in any other industry segment surveyed in 2013, followed by healthcare organizations, financial institutions, and media companies.

The fourth edition of the Terrorism Risk Insurance Report has found that demand for terrorism insurance remains strong and the renewal of the Terrorism Risk Insurance Program Reauthorization Act (TRIA) plays a key role in making coverage available and affordable.

The 2014 Marsh & McLennan Companies survey of roughly 2,600 clients found that the demand and price for terrorism insurance has remained constant since 2009. Education organizations purchase property terrorism insurance at a higher rate, 81 percent, than companies in any other industry segment surveyed in 2013, followed by healthcare organizations, financial institutions, and media companies.

On to Europe and rising doubts, reported by The Guardian:

Anti-EU vote could rise above 30% in European elections, says thinktank

  • Hardline sceptics could get 29% of vote and critical reformers 5%, although Open Europe’s definitions of groups are disputed

Anti-EU parties could win more than 30% of the vote across the continent in the European elections, according to calculations by the Open Europe thinktank, up from 24.9% on the vote in 2009.

The calculation – challenged by other analysts – suggests hardline sceptics could take as many as 218 (29%) of the 751 available seats, up from 164 out of 766 (21.4%) in the current parliament. Open Europe says this bloc is diffuse, ranging from mainstream governing parties to neo-fascists.

It forecasts that the European parliament will continue to be dominated by parties that favour the status quo or further integration, although their vote share is set to fall slightly.

BBC News covers good news for us, bad news for the banksters:

RBS plan for 200% bonuses blocked by Treasury body

Royal Bank of Scotland has abandoned attempts to pay bonuses twice the size of salaries after being told the move would not be approved.

UKFI, the body that manages the Treasury’s 81% stake in the bank, told RBS it would veto plans for a 2:1 bonus ratio at the next shareholder meeting.

“There will be no rise” while RBS is “still in recovery”, the Treasury said.

New EU rules mean the bank has to ask its shareholders for approval of annual bonuses above 100% of base salaries.

On to Germany and a warning from TheLocal.de:

Bundesbank warns of German slowdown

German economic growth is heading for a significant slowdown in the second quarter of 2014 after a robust first three months, the German central bank said on Monday.

“After the extremely strong start to the year, economic growth in Germany is expected to see a noticeable slowdown in the second quarter,” the Bundesbank said in its latest monthly report.

Growth in industrial orders has not continued with the “same intensity” as in the first two months of the year, it said.

Lisbon next, and embarrassing hacks from the Portugal News:

Attorney general’s office hacked, passwords accessible online

The web page of the Lisbon attorney general’s office has been hit by a hacker attack by ‘Anonymous Portugal’.

Saturday’s edition of Portuguese paper ‘Dário de Notícias’ said that personal details of more than 2,000 public prosecutor magistrates had been accessible online including their mobile and land line number and their passwords to reserved areas on the site.

The paper said that the hack, code named ‘national Blackout’, had also affected companies, political parties and the criminal investigation police.

On to Spain and a bare minimum protest from thinkSPAIN:

Naked police protest in council meeting

LOCAL Police officers burst into a council meeting in Torrevieja (Alicante), stripped down to their underpants and protested over forced changes to their working hours.

The 30 or so policemen bore slogans on their naked backs which said ‘no more chaos’ and ‘we’ve had enough’, among others.

Torrevieja’s PP council ordered the police off the premises and said it had no intention of changing officers’ duty hours back again, because their new timetables were ‘more efficient’.

Next up, Italy, and more Bunga Bunga blowback from EUbusiness:

Scandal-hit Berlusconi insists ‘friend of Jews, Germans’

Italy’s Silvio Berlusconi insisted he is a friend of Jewish people and Germany on Monday in a bid to quell international outrage sparked by his controversial remarks about the Holocaust.

The former premier said he was “a historic friend of the Jewish people and the state of Israel” and it was “surreal to attribute to me anti-German sentiment or a presumed hostility towards the German people, to whom I am a friend.”

The 77-year-old’s statement, posted on the website of his centre-right Forza Italy party, came after an international outcry over his claim on Saturday that Germans denied the existence of Nazi concentration camps.

The media mogul, who is campaigning for the European elections on behalf of his party despite a tax-fraud conviction, made the comment while lashing out at European Parliament chief Martin Schultz, the centre-left candidate in the race to lead the EU Commission.

After the jump, the latest mixed messages from Greece, a Ukrainian bailout, mass death sentences in Egypt, Chinese Brazilian dreams, a tension-filled Indian elections, printing houses in China, ramping up the Asian Game of Zones, nuclear nightmares, and tales of birds and bees. . . Continue reading