Category Archives: Economy

Chart of the day II: Ebola’s economic impacts


From a new report [PDF] from the World Bank. Click on the image to enlarge:

World Bank Document

EnviroWatch: Fires, climate, toads, fuels


We begin in the Golden State, and the latest disaster from a very dry state with the Los Angeles Times:

California wildfires: Thousands evacuated, fires explode in size

Thousands of residents who live near the American River in the Eldorado National Forest in Northern California remained evacuated Wednesday as a fast-moving wildfire exploded by 6,000 acres overnight.

The King fire continues to threaten thousands of homes and structures as winds drive it east, west and north over mountain and ridges and through deep canyon troughs.

The fire has become one of the largest and most unruly of 11 major wildfires burning across California, mainly in the central and northern parts of the state.

Much smaller fires, however, have proved to be extremely destructive.

More from the Los Angeles Times:

Climate change may add billions to wildfire costs, study says

As wildfires burned in California, a study by several major environmental groups estimated that climate change could mean that future blazes will be much larger and add billions of dollars to already costly losses.

The 46-page study released Tuesday, titled “Flammable Planet: Wildfires and the Social Cost of Carbon,” is part of an ongoing project by three groups to examine what it calls the missing risks, such as wildfires, that climate change can make more expensive. The groups are the Environmental Defense Fund, the Institute for Policy Integrity at NYU School of Law, and the Natural Resources Defense Council.

U.S. wildfires cost as much as $125 billion annually, but climate change could add as much as $60 billion to the bill by 2050, the study said. The projected cost increase is attributed to an expanding area in which wildfires burn — estimated to be 50% to 100% larger by 2050. California “could experience a 36% to 74% increase in area burned by 2085 under a high emissions path,” the study said.

From the New York Times, water woes inside the Beltway:

Climate Report Details Flood Risk to Sites in Washington

The nation’s capital is likely to see record flooding by 2050, putting about $7 billion worth of property, three military bases and parts of the National Mall at risk as a result of climate change that is raising sea levels all over the world, according to a report released Tuesday by the research group Climate Central.

That is one of the group’s more conservative estimates in a report titled “Washington, D.C., and the Surging Sea.”

In the worst case, the group draws an end-of-the-century picture of the Lincoln and Jefferson memorials as islands in a flooded Potomac River, and Fort McNair, the Washington Navy Yard and parts of Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling completely under water.

From the Guardian, similar woes Down Under:

Rising sea levels a ‘sleeping giant’ that could cost $226bn, report says

  • Analysis by the Climate Council finds Australia is likely to experience rises of 0.4m to 1m, putting infrastructure at risk

Rising sea levels are a “sleeping giant” issue that will put at risk coastal infrastructure worth up to $226bn, a new report has found.

Analysis by the Climate Council found Australia was likely to experience a sea level rise of 0.4m to 1m by the end of the century, with a “high end” scenario of 1.1m possible if the world warmed by about 4C compared with pre-industrial temperatures.

In this worst-case scenario, $226bn in property, including houses, schools, hospitals and ports, would be exposed to flooding and erosion, making much of it unviable.

BBC News covers climate change on a loftier plane:

Austria’s Alps hit by climate change

Austria, with its sensitive Alpine regions, has been particularly hard hit by climate change, a major survey says.

The Austrian Climate Change Assessment Report 2014 says average temperatures in Austria have risen by almost 2C since 1880. This is compared with a global rise of 0.85C in the same period.

The document says that the changes in temperature are mainly man-made and caused by “emissions of greenhouse gases”.

The report was put together by more than 200 scientists and presented in Vienna by Austrian Environment Minister Andrae Rupprechter.

From the Guardian, poles apart in more senses than one:

Antarctic sea ice set for record high as Arctic heads for sixth lowest extent

  • Antarctica poised for record high as figures show Arctic sea ice was millions of square kilometres below long-term average

The extent of sea ice in Antarctica is set to reach a record high, scientists said on Tuesday, as they announced that Arctic sea ice appeared to have shrunk to its sixth lowest level ever.

The NSIDC said that satellite data was expected to shortly confirm whether the maximum extent of sea ice at the opposite pole, in Antarctica, had set a new record.

“Antarctic sea ice is poised to set a record maximum this year, now at 19.7 million sq km (7.6m sq m) and continuing to increase,” the centre, considered one of the world’s top authorities on sea ice data, said in a statement.

Another cost of cleaner air continents apart via the Guardian:

China’s ban on ‘dirty’ coal could cost Australian mining almost $1.5bn

  • Australia exports about 50m tonnes of thermal coal each year to China and the ban is expected to reduce exports by 40%

China’s ban on “dirty” coal could cost Australia’s mining industry almost $1.5bn and force companies to find other markets or face prohibitively high processing costs, according to a leading resources economist.

Under new Chinese regulations, the use of coal with ash content higher than 16% and sulphur content above 1% will be restricted in the main population centres of the country from 1 January, 2015.

There will be a ban on mining, sale, transportation and imports of coal with ash and sulfur content exceeding 40% and 3% respectively. For coal that will be transported for more than 600 km from production site or receiving port, the ash content limit will be 20%.

The move, aimed at helping lift the smog that envelops Chinese cities such as Beijing, is likely to hurt Australian producers, who typically export coal with ash content above 20%. Australia exports around 50m tonnes of thermal coal each year to China and the ban is expected to reduce exports by 40%, a cost of $1.46bn at the current price of $73 a tonne.

BBC Worldwide covers another Australian woe:

Invasion Of The Deadly Cane Toads – Australia with Simon Reeve

Program note:

Simon is on a mission to find Australia’s most destructive creature, but it’s not be quite what he was expecting.

From the Guardian, anthropocentric arrogance at work:

Whaling opponents and pro-whaling nations, led by Japan, remain at odds

  • Diplomats at International Whaling Commission try to find compromise as New Zealand pushes to curb “scientific whaling”

Diplomats were preparing for one last push to find a compromise capable of bridging the divide between whaling nations and their opponents at the biennial International Whaling Commission summit in Slovenia.

A narrow majority of delegates have lined up behind a proposal from New Zealand to curb Japan’s “scientific whaling” ambitions by enforcing strict oversight on the number of whales that it may cull, and the scientific justifications for this, particularly the availability of non-lethal means for conducting research.

As a voluntary body, the IWC cannot compel Japan to stop whaling, but stepping outside its aegis would be undesirable for Tokyo and frantic last-minute attempts are being made to find a consensus deal that could pass without a divisive vote.

And from the Japan Times, consummation:

Japan tells IWC it will resume whaling despite international court’s halt order

Japan told an International Whaling Commission meeting Wednesday that it will resume its so-called research whaling in the Antarctic next fiscal year, while vowing to improve the transparency of the activities over which it lost an international court case earlier this year.

After the International Court of Justice ordered in March that the whaling be halted, ruling it was not for scientific research purposes as claimed by Tokyo, Japan canceled its annual Antarctic whaling voyage for fiscal 2014.

During the meeting in Slovenia, a Japanese official said the ICJ ruling did not deny research whaling in itself and Japan will propose a new whaling plan by taking heed of what the ICJ said in the ruling. Japan also said it will continue its “research whaling” in the Northwestern Pacific, which is not covered by the ICJ order, on a reduced scale.

For our final item, the latest in Fukushimapocalypse Now! from NHK WORLD:

Further step for frozen soil walls approved

Japan’s nuclear regulator has approved a further step in creating frozen soil walls around the crippled reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi plant.

The underground walls are aimed at preventing groundwater from entering reactor and other buildings, and reducing the amount of radioactive water generated there.

Plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Company began building parts of the walls in June. But the work has been limited due to difficulty in dealing with contaminated water in tunnels and pipes around the plant.

The firm later compiled measures to prevent radioactive water leaks from the tunnels and pipes on a side of the plant facing a hill.

EbolaWatch: Politics, woes, and warnings


We begin with high politics from the Yomiuri Shimbun:

U.S. submits Ebola draft to UNSC

The U.S. Mission to the United Nations has presented to U.N. Security Council members a draft of a Security Council resolution on the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, calling for a coordinated international response to the deadly virus.

The draft of the resolution obtained by The Yomiuri Shimbun on Tuesday calls on nations to provide urgent aid and lift travel restrictions that could isolate the Ebola-infected region.

The United States seeks to hold an emergency Security Council session on the Ebola outbreak on Thursday and have the resolution adopted at the meeting.

It is unusual for the Security Council to adopt a resolution on public health.

A video report covers some of the reasons for the finally aroused anxieties of the North, via CCTV America:

WHO assessing which countries can deal with Ebola virus

Program notes:

There are worrying reports for Ebola–Free African nations. The World Health Organisation has been assessing which African countries could handle in case there’s an outbreak. As CCTV America’s Jane Kiyo reports, apparently only two countries are up to the challenge.

Star Africa News has one nation’s death toll:

Liberia Ebola-related deaths at 1,424 – Report

Liberia’s Ebola-related deaths since the epidemic began in the country in March has reached 1, 424, according to a report by the Ministry of Health.

The report released on Wednesday showing the latest update on the situation of the epidemic in the country, said the figure concerns deaths in confirmed, probable and suspected cases of Ebola.

The report entitled the Ebola Situation Report covers March 22 through September 13, 2014.

And from France 24, we get the all-too-usual emphasis on non-Acfrican sufferers:

French MSF volunteer contracts Ebola in Liberia

A French volunteer working for Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders) in Liberia has contracted the Ebola virus, the medical charity said in a statement on Wednesday.

This is the first confirmed case of a French national catching the disease in the current outbreak. The volunteer was put in quarantine on Sept.16 when the first symptoms of the illness appeared.

She will be evacuated to a specialised treatment centre in France.

From Joel Pett, editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader, anxieties expressed:

BLOG Cartoon pett

Reuters covers preventative efforts:

West African powerhouse Ivory Coast battles to keep out Ebola

The worst recorded outbreak of the virus has killed over 2,400 people in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, wreaking havoc on their fragile economies, and has also spread to Nigeria and Senegal.

If it reaches Ivory Coast, the powerhouse of French-speaking West Africa, the economic consequences could be yet worse. The country of 20 million people exports 40 percent of the world’s cocoa, the raw material for chocolate, and supplies its landlocked neighbors with everything from rice to fuel.

Ivory Coast is taking the kind of aggressive anti-infection measures that its poorer, smaller western neighbors were slow to adopt. Hand washing stations have appeared at the entrances of government buildings and office towers in Abidjan, the bustling economic capital. People have abandoned the traditional three-kiss greeting.

The Guardian covers a radical measure:

Ebola lockdown in Sierra Leone: nationwide three-day curfew

  • Unprecented national shutdown, with health workers going house-to-house to identify Ebola cases; MSF raises concerns about capacity to cope

Residents across Sierra Leone, one of three countries at the centre of the biggest ever Ebola outbreak, scrambled on Wednesday to prepare for a three-day, unprecedented nationwide “lockdown” in a radical step intended to curb the spread of the killer virus, but which some health experts believe could worsen the epidemic.

Citizens will not be allowed to leave their homes from Thursday until Sunday. Known as “ose to ose” in the widely-used local Krio, health workers will also go house-to-house identifying cases and raising awareness. More than 2,300 have died across Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone in the nine-month epidemic that the World Bank warned this week could lead to deaths in the “tens of thousands” if unchecked by the end of the year.

Some 21,000 people have been recruited to enforce the lockdown, bulking up thousands of police and soldiers already deployed to quarantine districts in the worst-hit regions near the border with Guinea. But some international health experts have advised against the move, citing both practical concerns and disastrous attempts at the mass quarantine of the biggest slum in neighbouring Liberia.

Ghana lends a hand, via the Liberian Observer:

Accra to Serve as Transit Point for Flights

  • President Mahama Discloses; Frowns on Isolation of Ebola-affected Countries

The President of Ghana, John Dramani Mahama, has been in consultation with the United Nations secretary General, Ban Ki-Moon, to allow Accra to serve as a transit center for international flights that might be bringing in logistics, medicines and other relief items for the affected countries.

Accra is the capital of Ghana, but President Mahama said his consultation is in his capacity as chair of the regional body, Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS). This is a  demonstration of how Ghana is prepared to help affected the countries.

He spoke on Monday September 15, when he paid a one-day solidarity visit with President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf in Monrovia.

The New York Times covers financial alarms:

Ebola Could Devastate West African Economies, World Bank Says

The three West African countries most affected by Ebola could experience a “potentially catastrophic blow” to their economies because of the epidemic, the World Bank Group warned Wednesday.

The outbreak could cut gross domestic product by nearly 12 percent in Liberia and nearly 9 percent in Sierra Leone in 2015 if it is not curbed, according to the report. The impact to Guinea would be less severe, at around 2 percent.

A fear of contagion and what the bank referred to as “aversion behavior” is driving most of the economic losses. Places of employment are being closed, transportation is being disrupted, and vital links with other nations by air and sea are being cut, the analysis found.

Reuters hints at purse strings loosening:

IMF proposes $127 million for three Ebola-hit countries in West Africa

Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone could receive an additional $127 million from the International Monetary Fund to help them deal with the worst-ever outbreak of the Ebola virus, the IMF said on Wednesday.

The funds, which must still be approved by the IMF’s executive board, would help cover an estimated $300 million financing gap in the West African countries over the next six to nine months, when the IMF expects the impact of the outbreak to be most acute.

“The Ebola outbreak is a severe human, social and economic crisis that requires a resolute response from the international community,” IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde said in a statement. “The governments of the three countries have requested additional IMF support to help cover the acute financing needs they are facing as a result of the outbreak.”

The IMF on Wednesday proposed a $40 million loan for Guinea, $48 million for Liberia and $39 million for Sierra Leone. It has said economic growth in Liberia and Sierra Leone has been hurt in particular by the epidemic’s impact on agriculture, mining and the services sectors.

Punch Nigeria precludes:

World Bank excludes Nigeria from $105m W’African fund

The World Bank Group’s Board of Executive Directors has approved a $105m grant to finance Ebola-containment efforts in West African countries infected with the dreaded Ebola Virus Disease.

A statement issued by the bank in Washington on Wednesday to announce the development, however, excluded Nigeria as a beneficiary of the fund.

The bank said the fund would help families and communities in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone to cope with the economic impact of the Ebola crisis as well as rebuild and strengthen essential public health systems in the three worst-affected countries to guard against future disease outbreaks.

The Hill covers cash-inducing anxiety:

Congress worries Ebola could hit US, become more contagious

Lawmakers are increasingly concerned about the spread of Ebola and worry that it could jump to the United States and become more contagious.

President Obama on Tuesday unveiled new plans to surge U.S. support to West Africa that includes sending thousands of U.S. military personnel to the region and establishing a command-and-control center, and new hospitals to aid in the fight.

But lawmakers worry the president’s efforts might not be enough to contain the outbreak. Already, an estimated 2,400 have died from the disease, and the United Nations estimates $1 billion could be necessary to limit the epidemic.

And from Sky News, another vaccine trial, held in the North:

Former Nurse Tests Experimental Ebola Vaccine

  • A former NHS nurse has become the first person to be injected with an experimental ebola vaccine.

Ruth Atkins was given the jab in her arm and then carefully monitored by doctors for any side effects.

She is the first of 60 healthy volunteers to take part in a clinical trial at Oxford University’s Jenner Institute.

She was paid just £380 – not for the risk, but for any loss of earnings.

A video report from the London Telegraph:

British woman first to test Ebola vaccine

Program notes:

Ruth Atkins becomes the first volunteer to be injected with a potentially life-saving new vaccine that scientists hope will tackle Ebola

Another wake-up call received, via TheLocal.de:

Merkel promises help for Liberia in Ebola fight

Chancellor Angela Merkel has promised that Germany will send help to Liberia to tackle the Ebola crisis in response to a personal appeal by the country’s president, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf.

“We will act quickly and stand ready with everything we have available,” Merkel told journalists in Berlin on Wednesday. “The situation in Liberia is in fact very dramatic.”

German help to the stricken West African nation could include air transport, secure return flights for doctors and other workers from international organizations, help building hospital wards and support for the World Health Organization (WHO).

A Merkel spokeswoman said earlier that the German army was also examining what kind of help it might be able to offer Liberia.

African boots on the ground from the Liberian Observer:

AU to Deploys 200 Health Workers in Ebola Affeted Countries

The African Union (AU) is expected to deployed 200 health workers and other professionals,including nurses and doctors to Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone to help combat the deadly Ebola virus in the sub-region.

Africa Union’s Special Representative to Liberia, Amb. Toyin Solaja,said the deployment is a part of a joint AU-led military and civilian humanitarian mission code named African Union Support to Ebola Outbreak in West Africa (ASEOWA).

He puts the cost of the operation to more than 25 million United States Dollars. The Ambassador said a total of two hundred (200) professionals are expected to be deployed in the three countries.

More from Star Africa News:

Namibia gives $1m to Ebola countries

The Namibia government says it is contributing $1 million as a solidarity support to the West African countries currently battling the Ebola outbreak, the permanent secretary in the ministry of information Mbeuta Ua-Ndjarakana announced on Tuesday.

Ua-Ndjarakana told journalists that the contribution will be channeled through the World Health Organisation (WHO) to the African Public Health Emergency Fund for the containment of Ebola in Nigeria, Liberia, Sierra Leone and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

“Namibia is heeding the call made by the African Union to its member states and the international community to make contributions in cash or kind to assist its fight against the Ebola outbreak in some West African countries,” Ua-Ndjarakana said.

WHO needs an estimated $I billion to bring the epidemic under control, its officials said in Geneva earlier on Tuesday.

Updating a patient from the North with the Associated Press:

Doctors expect Nebraska Ebola patient to recover

An American aid worker infected with Ebola who’s being treated in Nebraska is now expected to make a full recovery, his doctors said Wednesday.

The medical team treating Rick Sacra also said it’s optimistic that the 51-year-old from Worcester, Massachusetts, will soon be able to leave the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha.

“However, we are still somewhat cautious because of the severity and unknown factors of this disease,” said Dr. Angela Hewlett, associate medical director of the isolation unit housing Sacra, who contracted Ebola while working in Liberia. “We know from experience how other patients look as their condition improves, but since we have so little experience treating patients with Ebola, that tempers our optimism a little bit.”

The Independent covers another extraordinary measure up North:

Ebola outbreak: Survivor William Pooley flown to US to give doctor with virus emergency blood transfusion

William Pooley, the British nurse who was cured of the Ebola, has been flown to America on a life-saving mission to give blood to a new victim of the deadly virus.

Mr Pooley has travelled to Atlanta for an emergency blood transfusion which could save the life of a doctor who contracted the disease while working in Sierra Leone.

The 29-year-old, who became the first Briton to contract Ebola, could help the US victim fight off the virus because his blood carries antibodies for the disease, the Evening Standard reports.

Mr Pooley was put on a flight on Friday night, paid for by the World Health Organisation, to Atlanta where the doctor is being treated in an isolation unit at Emory University Hospital.

Evangelicals ignoring border bans, with Star Africa News:

Batswana disregard travel ban to Ebola nations

Botswana citizens are defying a ban imposed by the Ministry of Health on travel to countries affected by Ebola, an official said Wednesday.Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokesperson Diadi Mmualefe told private radio station Gabz FM that some Batswana continued to visit West Africa despite warnings by the Ministry of Health against travelling to Ebola-affected countries.

He revealed that two Batswana travelled on Tuesday night to Nigeria where they want to attend a church service at the Synagogue Church of All Nations (SCOAN) led by televangelist TB Joshua.

Botswana is one of southern African countries that have banned travel to Nigeria, Guinea, Senegal, Sierra Leone and Liberia that are at the epicentre of an Ebola outbreak that has so far killed more than 2,000 people in the region since March.

From Agence France-Presse, a graphic look inside an Ebola treatment center, based on a plan from Medicine sans Frontieres:

BLOG Ebola center

From the Guardian, a protest from Down Under:

$7m Ebola contribution is not enough, says Australian Medical Association

  • Brian Owler says additional $7m in Ebola aid should be bolstered by deployment of Australian health workers

Australia’s contribution to fighting the Ebola virus is still inadequate despite the promise of another $7m, the head of the Australian Medical Association has warned.

Brian Owler said last week that the government’s commitment of $1m to the World Health Organisation to control the outbreak in west Africa was inadequate, and on Wednesday the government pledged an extra $7m.

WHO and Médecins Sans Frontières will each receive $2.5m, while $2m will be given to Britain to help combat the disease in Sierra Leone, the foreign minister, Julie Bishop, said.

Punch Nigeria covers classroom concerns:

Ebola: Senate urges schools to take precautionary measures

The Senate on Wednesday urged all schools in Nigeria to take precautionary measures to contain the spread of the Ebola virus.

The Senate also appealed to the African Union and the Economic Community of West African States to create regional and continent wide containment programmes to avoid further spread of the deadly virus.

The Senate made this appeal as part of resolutions reached after a debate on a motion, entitled, “The Ebola Virus Disease in Nigeria,” sponsored by Senator Ifeanyi Okowa and 106 others.

Punch Nigeria again, with more classroom concerns:

Ebola outbreak: Parents still worry about possible outbreak

All appears set for the September 22 resumption date as directed by the Federal Government. But, in spite of the dramatic change of mind exhibited by the Nigerian Medical Association, parents and guardians are still apprehensive of a possible outbreak and the devastating effects it would have on children and teenagers.

While the NMA said its latest decision that pupils could go back to schools was based on the fact that no confirmed case of EVD in the country again, the Nigerian Union of Teachers has directed its members not to report to work unless safety gadgets are provided for them though it remained to be seen how far the union could go in view of the fact that the government in some states have asked the schools to reopen on Sept 22.

Parents who spoke with our correspondent on Wednesday expressed diverse opinions on the resumption date.

Punch Nigeria again, with still more:

Niger to reopen schools October

THE Niger State Government has decided that all schools in the state will reopen for the new academic year in October, contrary to the Sept 22 date declared by the Federal Government.

The Federal Government had shifted the resumption dates for all private and public schools in the country to next Monday as a result of the recent outbreak of the Ebola Virus Disease in the country.

However, in announcing the new resumption date for public schools in the state on Wednesday, the Niger State Government said it had taken into account the forthcoming Eid-el Kabir Muslim festival expected to hold worldwide in the first week of October.

And for our final Nigerian school item, again from Punch Nigeria, a union call:

Sept 22: Ekiti NUT tells teachers to stay away

The Nigeria Union of Teachers in Ekiti State has asked its members to comply with the directive of its national body to shun the September 22 resumption date for the 2014/2015 academic session.

Chairman of the union in Ekiti, Samuel Akosile, on Wednesday, said his members would not resume work until certain preventive measures capable of curtailing the Ebola Virus Disease had been put in place .

He urged government to organise seminars and workshops on Ebola for teachers in the state, saying “This will broaden their horizons on what the virus is all about and precautions to be taken to engender safety.”

The NUT chairman urged the state government to procure Infra-red thermometers and provide pipe-borne water and sanitisers in all the state-owned primary and secondary schools in order to give the assurances that government was committed to safety in school environments.

Next, from the Liberian Observer, a growing phenomenon:

Orphaned by Ebola

September 15, 2014, an unidentified toddler is seen standing unaware of the commotion going on around her. She and her gravely sick mother had just disembarked few minutes ago, from a taxi cab. Her mother struggled to take few steps, she collapsed and died. The innocent child was pulled away from her. The woman’s “lifeless body” was immediately dumped over other dead bodies already in a pickup truck waiting to transport the dead either for burial or to the crematorium.

She’s still unidentified.

According to witnesses standing in front of Redemption Hospital, which has quite recently become an Ebola holding center, the little girl and her said mother came to the hospital for treatment.

“Just how they arrived, the mother died in the car and her body was added to the bodies that were being taken out of the hospital today,” stated an LNP officer, who asked not to be named.

And for our final item, Defense One covers the American national security perspective:

Africa Needs the US Military To Fight Ebola

Both civilian and military public health experts understand how to contain highly transmissible infectious diseases, such as SARS, avian influenza, the MERS Coronavirus, and other pandemic-prone diseases. These diseases are threats to global security that could lead to outbreaks with significant costs including massive loss of life, a weakened work force, geopolitical instability, and economic disruption and losses. But given the relative successes in responding to these diseases, it has been surprising and disappointing that collective international actions against Ebola have thus far proven largely unsuccessful.

As Laurie Garrett, senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations, rightly points out, Ebola won’t be stopped with principles of global solidarity and earnest appeals. Disjointed and erratic funding efforts, dozens of volunteer health workers, and closing national barriers in West African states is either too little, too late, or too ineffective. Like Heracles slaying the many-headed Hydra, cutting off the beast’s individual heads was not enough; only by cauterizing the stumps was he able to contain the threat. Like Heracles, we must evaluate our futile tactics and engage an asymmetric advantage to bring to a halt this unprecedented yet containable Ebola outbreak.

Changing the dynamics of the West African outbreak requires behavioral changes including adjustments to burial practices and sanitation issues that are particularly conducive to the spread of Ebola. The consumption of bushmeat—that is, animal meat from the wild rather than domestically farmed—is also a significant risk factor. On a societal level, there are more broad-based cultural factors at play including a serious mistrust of health aid workers and the national government.

Chart of the day: American views on trade dim


From a new report from the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project:

Microsoft Word - Pew Research Center Trade Report FINAL Septembe

Chart of the day III: Italian deflation continues


From the Italian National Institute of Statistics [Istat]:

BLOG Italian CPI

Charts of the day II: The plutocratic ascendancy


From Quartz:

BLOG IncomeAnd a companion chart, via the New York Times:

BLOG GDP

EbolaWatch: Religion, promises, measures, death


We open with a rather chilling video, shot on the streets of Liberia’s capital, in which Christian fundamentalists conduct a very risky [note the touching] faith-healing prayer session around a prone Ebola patient.

From RadioAfrica:

LIBERIA:(RELIGION AND THE FIGHT AGAINST EBOLA)

Program notes:

Group of Liberians Evangelist prays over a suspected Ebola patient. All facing the possibility of contracting the deadly virus.

On to the hard news, first with the Associated Press:

UN Security Council to meet on Ebola

The United States called an emergency meeting of the U.N. Security Council Thursday on the Ebola crisis in West Africa, saying the situation on the ground is “dire” and getting worse every day.

U.S. U.N. Ambassador Samantha Power said the United States has asked the 193 U.N. member states to come to the meeting with “concrete commitments” to tackle the outbreak, especially in hardest-hit Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea.

“The trendlines in this crisis are grave, and without immediate international action we are facing the potential for a public health crisis that could claim lives on a scale far greater than current estimates, and set the countries of West Africa back a generation,” Power told reporters on Monday. “This is a perilous crisis but one we can contain if the international community comes together to meet it head on.”

Word from Washington leaked, via Reuters:

Obama to detail plans on Ebola offensive on Tuesday: WSJ

U.S. President Barack Obama is expected to detail on Tuesday a plan to boost his country’s involvement in mitigating the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday.

The plan would involve a greater involvement of the U.S. military in tackling the worst recorded outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus, the Journal reported, citing people familiar with the proposal.

The U.S. government has already committed around $100 million to tackle the outbreak by providing protective equipment for healthcare workers, food, water, medical and hygiene equipment.

Obama could ask Congress for an additional $88 million to fund his proposal, the WSJ reported. Plan details are expected during Obama’s visit Tuesday to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.

More from Science:

U.S. government set to announce surge of help for Ebola epidemic

A week after sharp criticism met the U.S. military’s announcement that it planned to help Liberia combat its Ebola epidemic with a “deployable hospital” that has a mere 25 beds, U.S. President Barack tomorrow plans to unveil dramatic new efforts to assist the West African countries besieged by the disease.

Obama, who will be visiting the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta to discuss the U.S. response, likely will announce plans to send more deployable hospitals, critical medical supplies like personal protective gear, and doctors and other healthcare workers who can care for infected people and help contain spread. (A  U.S. Senate hearing on Ebola will also take place tomorrow with testimony from key public officials and Ebola survivor Ken Brantly.)

Nicole Lurie, assistant secretary for preparedness and response at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), spoke with ScienceInsider on Friday and said she expected there would be “a substantial surge” in the U.S. government’s assistance. She particularly wants to see more attention paid to providing infected people with good care. “There’s a very, very wide variability in what’s being delivered as clinical care,” says Lurie, noting that case fatality rates differ dramatically  in different locations. “We know that simple interventions are likely to save the most lives.”

From the Associated Press, a question:

US works to step up Ebola aid, but is it enough?

The American strategy on Ebola is two-pronged: Step up desperately needed aid to West Africa and, in an unusual step, train U.S. doctors and nurses for volunteer duty in the outbreak zone. At home, the goal is to speed up medical research and put hospitals on alert should an infected traveler arrive.

Amid criticism that the world still is not acting fast enough against the surging Ebola epidemic, President Barack Obama travels Tuesday to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to discuss the outbreak with health officials who’ve been there.

Also Tuesday, a Senate hearing will examine the U.S. response. An American missionary doctor who survived the disease is scheduled to testify.

The administration hasn’t said how big a role the military ultimately will play — and it’s not clear how quickly additional promised help will arrive in West Africa.

Trooping in, via the Monrovia [Liberia] Inquirer:

U.S. Military To Build 25-Bedroom Ebola Hospital

It has been disclosed in Monrovia that the United States (US) Military will build a 25-bedoom hospital in the country to buttress efforts aimed at fighting the Ebola virus.     United State Ambassador accredited near Monrovia, Madam Debra Malac, said discussions are ongoing as where the hospital should be built but was certain that it would be constructed in Montserrado County.

Ambassador Malac addressing the weekly Press Briefing at the Ministry of Information said the unprecedented outbreak of the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in West Africa is an International Security priority for the U.S. Government and as such they will continue to be engaged in the region to eradicate the disease.

The U.S. Envoy said, “This is the worst outbreak of this virus in 40 years since it was first discovered. We defeated it and this time we will defeat it again. We will stop Ebola and it will take more work.”

Here’s a video report on her press conference from FrontPageAfrica:

FPA WEB TV: Uncle Sam’s Ebola AID

Program note:

U.S. Ambassador to Liberia Debora Malac outlines how much financial assistance in kind and in dollars the U.S. has contributed to the West Africa Ebola Outbreak.

From the Monrovia Inquirer, another hospital inaugurated:

Save The Children Constructs Central Region 1st Ebola Treatment Unit

Save the Children has turned over a 50-bed Ebola Treatment facility in Suakoko, Bong County worth about US$170,000 intended to serve the central region as part of its contribution to the national fight against the spread of the virus in other parts of the country.

The construction of the ETU which is a project solely undertaken by Save the Children according to its acting Country Director, Mercy Gichuhi who turned over the unit, was as a result of a request made to them from the local health team of Bong County.

Madam Gichihi said Save the Children believes that the construction of the health facility will go a long way in responding to the health need in that region and that Phebe Hospital focuses more on primary health care and at the same time give confidence to the health workers who will know that they have a place to refer confirmed Ebola patients.

Al Jazeera English covers critical context:

Nigeria’s weak health sector confronts Ebola

Spread of Ebola contained, but health system is having trouble dealing with treatable diseases which kill thousands.

Africa’s biggest oil producer and largest economy has one of the world’s highest child and maternal mortality rates. In 2012, an estimated 827,000 children under five died, while the reported maternal mortality rate was 550 per 100,000 live births, according to UNICEF.

Most of Nigeria’s childhood deaths are due to preventable or curable diseases: mainly malaria, pneumonia, and diarrhoea. Primary healthcare, run by local governments – Nigeria’s smallest unit of government – is tasked with handling these common illnesses.

The level of care in each centre varies, but generally, primary facilities do not have enough health workers, supplies, equipment, training, or transport – including ambulances to take patients to state or federal hospitals, says Michael Asuzu, a public health and epidemiology professor at the University of Ibadan.

From BBC News, a Brit on the scene:

Ebola virus: ‘Biological war’ in Liberia

With warnings from officials that the Ebola virus is “spreading like wildfire” in Liberia, Sarah Crowe, who works for the UN children’s agency (Unicef), describes her week on the Ebola front line:

Flights into disaster zones are usually full of aid workers and journalists. Not this time.

The plane was one of the first in after some 10 airlines stopped flying to Liberia because of Ebola, and still it was empty.

When I was last in Liberia in 2006, it was to work on reintegration of child soldiers in a time of peace. Now the country is fighting a “biological war” from an unseen enemy without foot soldiers.

As we enter the airport, an unnerving sight – a team of health workers kitted out with masks and gloves asks us to wash our hands with a chlorine solution and takes our temperatures.

A parallel set of American eyes from the Washington Post:

A virus hunter faces the big one: Ebola

Joseph Fair hunts viruses. That’s his thing. The 37-year-old American loves chasing dangerous pathogens, studying them in secure labs or searching for them in jungles where the microbes lurk.

And one virus has always loomed as the big one — Ebola. The scientists who first chased this dreaded microbe back in the ‘80s and ‘90s became legends, inspiring a generation of virologists like Fair. He read their books and papers. He studied how they contained the pathogen’s spread. And the scientists always won. The outbreaks ended, Ebola driven away.

So when the call came in March to travel to Sierra Leone, Fair was excited. He loved Mama Salone, as locals know the nation. He’d worked here for years. His new job: to advise Sierra Leone’s government on a tiny Ebola outbreak in neighboring Guinea, at the behest of the U.S. Defense Department. He set up an Ebola emergency operations center. He trained medical staff. He drew up just-in-case plans. By mid-May, the outbreak seemed on its way out. Fair packed his bags and left.

Then Ebola exploded.

From FrontPageAfrica, high-level visitors take a pre-opening hospital tour:

FPA WEB TV: ‘Liberia Will Beat Ebola’

Program notes:

World Health Organization (WHO) team tours the soon-to-be completed 120-Bed Ebola Clinic at the Island Clinic in Monrovia. WHO and its partners have supported construction of this new centre, which will be able to provide treatment for 120 patients at a time. Additional centers for about 400 more patients will be completed in the coming weeks.

BBC News covers a donation:

Ebola outbreak: Malaysia sends W Africa medical gloves

Malaysia plans to donate more than 20 million protective rubber gloves to five African countries affected by the Ebola outbreak, the government says.

They will be distributed among medical workers in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea, Nigeria and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

A shortage of protective equipment has been one factor in the virus spreading.

Joseph Harker asks a question we’ve also entertained, via the Guardian:

Why are western health workers with Ebola flown out, but locals left to die?

  • The death of Dr Olivet Buck after the WHO refused to fly her out of Sierra Leone is not just wrong: it’s making the Ebola epidemic worse

My brother-in-law, Albert, is a GP based in the West Midlands. His sister Olivet Buck was a doctor too: though her work was quite different. She practised in the land of their birth, Sierra Leone. For the past few months she was fighting in the desperate battle against Ebola ravaging parts of her country. Last Tuesday came the awful news that she’d caught the virus.

To save her life, local campaigners called for her to be evacuated to Germany to receive treatment – all three previous doctors who had caught the disease in the country had died. Sierra Leone’s president backed her, saying that a hospital in Hamburg was “in readiness to receive her”. Last Friday, though, the World Health Organisation said it would not allow her to leave Sierra Leone, and refused to fund the move. Desperate attempts were made to try to overturn this decision but on Sunday came the news everyone was dreading: Olivet had died.

Albert, distraught, told me: “I shall never stop weeping at all our loss. Olivet was a truly remarkable person. She died because she would not forsake her service to others.”

But the death of Olivet, a 59-year-old mother of three, raises wider questions about how the world responds to the Ebola crisis, and how it protects those working closest to stop its spread.

Despite the fate of the previous doctors, the WHO had said merely that it would work to give Buck “the best care possible” in Sierra Leone.

However, foreign health and aid workers have been sent abroad from Sierra Leone and Liberia for treatment – including the British nurse William Pooley, who survived and now wishes to go back to Sierra Leone to continue helping to fight the disease. Only last Friday, two Dutch doctors were flown home after coming into contact with infected patients.

But so far no local health workers have been evacuated: even though, according to the WHO, in west Africa 301 have so far caught Ebola and 144 have died. Dr Sheik Humarr Khan, Sierra Leone’s top Ebola doctor, was being considered for evacuation to a European country when he died of the disease in late July.

More from the Associated Press:

Sierra Leone: WHO too slow to help doc with Ebola

Sierra Leone accused the World Health Organization on Monday of being “sluggish” in facilitating an evacuation of a doctor who died from Ebola before she could be sent out of the country for medical care.

Dr. Olivet Buck died Saturday, hours after the U.N. health agency said it could not help evacuate her to Germany.

Buck is the fourth Sierra Leonean doctor to die in an outbreak that has also touched Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Senegal. The West African outbreak has been blamed for more than 2,400 deaths, and experts say it is out of control. The U.S. has called an emergency meeting of the U.N. Security Council for this week to discuss the crisis.

At a heated news conference Monday, a Sierra Leonean government official read a statement saying that the Buck is the second doctor from that country to die because negotiations on evacuation had dragged on. Dr. Sheik Humarr Khan, the country’s top Ebola expert, was being considered for evacuation when he died of the disease in July.

From the Kampala, Uganda, Daily Monitor, a warning:

Tanzania at high risk of Ebola outbreak

Last week, the Tanzanian government assured the public of its unwavering commitment to keeping Ebola out after standard thermal scanners to detect Ebola suspects were installed at four major airports-Julius Nyerere International Airport in Dar-es-Salaam, Kilimanjaro International Airport, Zanzibar and Mwanza.

At the weekend, Health ministry authorities were hard at work allaying fears of an outbreak in Tanzania. But a new study titled “Mapping the zoonotic niche of Ebola virus disease in Africa” has raised the alarm in Tanzania and other countries across Africa where Ebola has never been reported.

It suggests that governments in those countries should start thinking of new ways to deal with the Ebola threat beyond targeting major airports and seaports. The researchers, who published the findings in eLife Journal this week, believe the Ebola virus is thriving in wild animals, which are its major reservoir. Tanzania, Burundi and 13 other African countries where no case of Ebola has been reported so far are home to wild animals.

Public Radio International makes that critical point:

This American doctor says racism is to blame for the slow response to the Ebola outbreak

Why has the global response to the Ebola outbreak been so slow? “I think it’s racism,” says Dr. Joia Mukherjee.

“I think it’s easy for the world — the powerful world, who are largely non-African, non-people of color — to ignore the suffering of poor, black people,” says Mukherjee, a professor at Harvard Medical School and chief medical officer at the Boston-based non-profit Partners in Health.

Race isn’t the only reason she believes it’s easy to dismiss the issues. “I think it’s also classism,” she says. “These are not countries that contribute massively to the global economy, so it’s easy to just otherize this problem.”

In that context, consider this from a country where a disproportionately large percentage of those in need of assistance are African American, via Salon:

Arizona GOPer quits after disgusting comment — but there’s a catch

  • Russell Pearce called for sterilizing Medicaid recipients. It’s gross, but here’s why the problem’s bigger than him

Pearce’s proposal was abhorrent, but it also laid bare the dehumanizing logic of Republican programs that punish the poor. If the GOP wants to distance itself from punitive and invasive policies that hurt low-income families, they should look in the mirror and start slowly backing away from their reflections.

A few things here. Pearce’s idea isn’t new. The United States has an ugly history of forced or otherwise coerced sterilization against people of color, the poor and others considered “unfit to procreate,” including rape victims and people with disabilities. Between 1907 and 1980, nearly 65,000 Americans were sterilized under state-sponsored programs. In total, 31 states had sterilization programs that directly targeted welfare recipients. North Carolina recently acted to compensate victims of its forced sterilization program, which specifically targeted black women and children. (And last year, the Center for Investigative Reporting revealed that nearly 150 women in California’s prison system were sterilized between 2006 and 2010, often without their knowledge or consent. The state legislature acted this year to end the program.)

That said, Pearce isn’t the only Republican to float the idea of coercively sterilizing welfare recipients in recent years. And his proposal is hardly the only assault on low-income families in the state. Arizona, you’ll remember, is where Shanesha Taylor was arrested after leaving her children in the car so she could attend a job interview.

From Punch Nigeria, help wanted:

ECOWAS seeks support for research

The Economic Community of West African States has appealed to its partners to support the regional initiatives aimed at strengthening epidemiological and therapeutic research as well as surveillance and improvements in health facilities in order to prevent and control the Ebola Virus Disease.

The sub-continental body called for support for the Regional Solidarity Fund to fight Ebola and welcomed the pledges made by some multilateral and bilateral partners to support some of the affected countries.

Speaking at the opening of the 10th edition of the ECOWAS/Development Partners Annual Coordination meeting at the ECOWAS Secretariat on Monday, in Abuja, President of the Commission, Mr. Kadre Ouedraogo, said the group welcomed the coordinated approach adopted to combat the viral disease through the World Health Organisation.

StarAfrica covers another donation:

China donates 80mn francs worth of Ebola prevention materials to Mali

The Malian president, Ibrahim Boubacar Keita has returned from his trip to China with a CFA 80 million francs worth medical material aimed at backing his government’s efforts to prevent the Ebola virus from entering the country, the Malian presidency disclosed Sunday.

The Chinese donation includes 1,000 sprays, 1,000 protective gears, 30 medically-equipped isolation tents, 600 protective masks, 600 shoes and 1,000 thermometers.

The Malian press reported recently the complaints of the medical staff deployed in Bamako road station where passengers from Ebola-hit neighboring Guinea are hosted.

The medical staff had lamented a lack of protective means which increases the risk of contagion.

From Punch Nigeria, a reminder about a key player:

Private sector in the first line of battle

The management of the Ebola Virus Disease has cost the Federal Government N2.1bn so far. Last month, a sum of N1.9bn was released to the Federal Ministry of Health for disbursement to the 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory. Lagos State, as the first epicentre of the outbreak, also got a separate N200m support from the Federal Government.

The funds, no doubt, are a drop in the ocean in providing Personal Protective Equipment discarded daily after use by health workers in isolation centres across the country; intravenous fluid and other drugs for infected people, diagnostic machines, daily payment for volunteers and other sundry expenses attached to the management of the virus.

Ahead of the September 22 resumption date for all primary and post primary schools in the country, a coalition of players in the private sector are seeking for an active participation in preventing a future outbreak of the EVD, especially in congested communities across the country.

The Guardian questions:

As Ebola closes schools in Africa, how do we help children learn?

  • As Ebola robs children of schooling, the seeds are being sown for continued problems. Vigilance and flexibility may be our best response to the virus

In response to the growing threat of Ebola across west Africa, the governments of Nigeria, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea have closed their schools. The closures are only temporary, but that could change if the spread of the virus continues and accelerates.

As of 12 September, the World Health Organization (WHO) reports that Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea are facing widespread and intense transmission of Ebola (about 100 to 200 new cases per country per week). In other affected countries, the outbreak has been more localised. But in each affected areas the threat could expand rapidly, and there are credible predictions that Ebola could migrate to 15 additional countries and infect more than 20,000 people.

With that prognosis, closing schools is an understandable and prudent step to protect children and their families from exposure. The most immediate priority is to put out a raging and growing fire that threatens to affect more lives and territory.

And the Kampala, Uganda, Daily Monitor throws another handful of sand into gearbox:

Residents uproot cassava in fear of floods

Farmers in Omoro Sub-county, Alebtong District have begun uprooting their cassava, fearing it might rot in gardens. The move follows persistent rains that have caused flooding in the area.

Farmers who spoke to Daily Monitor said uprooting the cassava might save them from totally losing out as other crops have been washed away by floods.

As a measure, residents are drying their crops on roof tops and others have constructed high raise houses where they can temporarily sleep as they wait for floods to reduce.

And from StarAfrica, our final item and another critical bit of context:

Namibia ropes in Ethiopian pharmacists to address shortage

Currently, Namibia has 55 pharmacists working in the public health sector, of which ten are Namibians while the rest are expatriates.

With the population of just over two million, the country needs at least 1000 pharmacists, as in accordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended ration.

In 2012, the University of Namibia established a School of Pharmacy, an edition to the Medical School, which the Health Minister said are part of the country’s long-term effort to address the shortage of qualified health personnel.